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Topic: "Spectrum" Roasting & St Helena (26 lines)
1) From: jim gundlach
Re: +"Spectrum" Roasting & St Helena
on 6/3/01 11:13 PM, H.K. at n655321 wrote:
Hello,
 
I don't know if this is considered to be a mélange roast or not, but I like to "test-drive" each bean by roasting it to different degrees, tasting those different degrees separately, then finally blending them together in equal ratios.  For example, I roast one type of bean to city, full city, and French (or so) and blend it all together.  I like to think that this is giving me the entire spectrum of the bean's flavors in one cup.  My question is, in your opinion, am I actually ruining or "wasting" the experience by doing this?  Do certain degrees of roast for a given bean negate or mask certain attributes if blended with a different roast of the same bean?!  I assume this is fairly common, but I wanted to know early if I am just wasting beans at this point.  I roast in a Fresh Roast machine, so one "spectrum" roasting uses up most of my pound of coffee beans.  I then decide if it's worth buying more of the same, only perhaps in larger quantities.  Opinions?
 
Harry
Harry,
   This is the approach I wanted to take but I simply did not have the time to be that systematic. None of my first efforts at blending came close to matching the full rich flavor I found in all of Tom's blends.  I ended up using my experimentation time with roasting methods and ended up roasting over pecan wood fires in an old fireplace popcorn popper that exposes the beans to the fire and smoke.
   Mt. St Helena has the most pronounced citrus flavor I have found in any of the coffees I have tried.  Some friends who I served it to think it is a wonderful coffee but I do not place it at the top of the ones I like.  If it is available again, I will buy some and serve it to people who do or might like it.
  Jim Gundlach
  roasting over pecan wood fires
  in Shorter, Alabama


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