HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Traveling to Germany...What about my coffee? (25 msgs / 1322 lines)
1) From: zigzagmolly
Soon, my husband and I are taking a 9 day trip to Germany.   I'm going
to have to find a way to take some coffee with me, but not sure how to
manage it all.
We will be occupying an inn in the Sauerland for 5 nights and then 2
nights in Bacharach.  There is supposed to be a coffee pot at the Inn,
but I have no idea what kind it is. I have no idea what is available
in Bacharach.
This is my current plan:
Bring stainless steel leak-proof travel mugs on plane( clip to
backpacks when done)
Pack:
Freshly roasted whole beans in a coffee bags with degassing valves
SwissGold 1 cup filter
Outlet adapter (bringing this anyway)
Grinder options:  bring old Melitta blade grinder and leave it in Germany o=
r
purchase mortar and pestle to take with us? 
I figure we will find hot water one way or another.  Do they give you
hot water on the plane?  It's a 10 hr trip and I could take some
ground coffee too and make fresh coffee during the flight without any
trouble at all.  Put grounds in filter over spill proof cup and pour
in water.  That's not crazy is it?
We've been out of the country for 24 hrs to Canada and that is the
extent of our international travel, so any assistance would be much
appreciated.
Thanks,
Nancy

2) From: Frank Haist
Nancy,
    Quite a lot of thought has gone into this. To me, it sounds like the 
coffee, SS cups, blade grinder, coffee filter, et al. is going to take a 
bit of space. You must be a better packer than I, as when I go to Europe 
I usually don't have the extra room. If it was me and I knew where I was 
going to be staying, I'd FedEx the roasted coffee to the inn along with 
the grinder. Mortar and pestle doesn't seem necessary unless you're 
really into manual labor while travelling.
     Leak-proof cups work well on the plane. I've used them several 
times for morning domestic flights. Yes, you can get hot water on the 
plane. Typically, it is really really hot! Not sure how wise it would be 
to try to pour that over a filter during flight. One bump of turbulance 
and you have a lap of pain and not much you can do about it. However, I 
might caution against too much coffee, which might mean any, on a long 
international flight. Ten hours is a long flight and believe me, that 
time would be better spent sleeping than making coffee (even decaf). 
That sleep will make your first day in Germany much more enjoyable. 
Otherwise, you're spending the whole first day groggy trying to force 
your body to the massive time adjustment.
    I've not been to Germany, so can't give any advice regarding coffee. 
However, if you were going to Italy, France, or some other European 
destinations (coffee in Budapest was generally very good), I'd say leave 
the home roast behind (I know, perish the thought) and enjoy some of the 
really wonderful local brew. Some of the best coffee I've ever had was 
at a small hotel in Rome. That alone forced me to get my Silvia for 
americanos. Maybe someone on the list has experience with coffee around 
Germany.
    Have fun on the trip.
---Frank
zigzagmolly wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Brett Mason
Check out the Zassenhaus supply on www.ebay.de - purchase one for
about $6 and arrange to pick it up when you are there...
Brett
On 5/5/05, zigzagmolly  wrote:
<Snip>
 or
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

4) From: Michael Wascher
Here's the path form EBay.de's stat page to the Coffee Mill catagory:
Startseite  > Alle
Kategorien>
Haushaltsgeräte>
Kaffee
& Espressomaschinen>
*Kaffeemühlen*
A tip for EBay. Everything is one big database. Once you get to a listing=
 
you are interested in, change the de to com in the browser's URL and refres=
h 
the page. EBay will repaint the screen using the US template. Stuff that's=
 
still in german can be cut & pasted into a translation tool.
On 5/6/05, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
y 
<Snip>
-- 
"You can lead a yak to water, but you can't teach an old dog to make a silk=
 
purse out of a pig in a poke" - Opus

5) From: jlronk
Frank Haist wrote:
<Snip>
i recently tried to send fresh home roast an active duty military person 
in germany. after i went to the post office and filled out the customs 
info the postal worker told me that i couldn't send coffee. german 
customs prohibits it. i was quite surprised. had to open the box and 
take out the coffee. and no i didn't leave it w/ the postal worker!! so 
the moral of the story is either carry it of don't declare it and take 
your chances w/ shipping and customs.
-jeff r

6) From: Bob Baker
I hope you are going up the Mosel???
If so and you don't have lodging we have friends in Treis/Karden.
Last time we went we rented a car at the airport and pointed the
car down the road in kind of a general area we wanted to go,
and have never had a better time.
Bob
zigzagmolly wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Tim TenClay
I lived in Germany for a year and, though this may be a faulty memory,
I recall the coffee served to have been much better than anything I
tend to get around here.  Even in youth hostels.
You should be able to get hot water just about anywhere if you ask for
it.  Also, many Germans refuse to drink tap water and will look at you
funny if you do, but their tap water purity is as good (or better!)
than tap in the states.  Make sure you pay attention to whether you're
buying bubbly water or still (I presume bubbly wouldn't make very good
coffee :-)
I don't know where you live, but for a grinder, you might consider an
inexpensive manual pepper grinder - Although I haven't purchased one
myself, I've been watching them at World Market.  That way you don't
have to worry about the electricity differences....
Have fun!
I cannot put into words my jealousy :-)
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
-- 
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253

8) From: Wandering Curmudgeon
On Fri, 2005-05-06 at 00:07 -0700, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Total Flashback occurred here:  When traveling in Europe folks would
want to know where I was from in the states.  I was from Vallejo
California but knowing that wouldn't be any help I would just say San
Francisco.  Frequently I would get "I have a cousin Fredrich that lives
in Los Angles, maybe you've met him??"      Brett, get a bigger map!
Germany is huge and you could put in a couple of days "picking it up."
I have a Whirly-blad that I carry when I travel.  I'm not into any labor
early in the morning    I crush the beans and dump
them into the French Press without opening the other eye. I bought an
Esiphon vac pot that turns out to be a great way to heat water .   Its not like punching the button on the SM5K but it gets
my heart started.
John - really loving life in the slow lane

9) From: Frank Haist
You know, this does make sense now that I think about it. I remember 
reading once that drugs used to be smuggled wrapped in coffee (don't 
know if that was roasted or green). As I recall, this was done because 
the coffee scent was a great mask that dogs had difficulty smelling 
anything else through. Maybe urban myth,  but that would explain a 
customs ban. Home roast certainly is not going to disrupt the domestic 
coffee industry of Germany.
---Frank
jlronk wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Jerry Procopio
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jeff,
If you are mailing to someone on active duty stationed overseas they 
should have an APO/FPO address that you can mail to.  When mailing to 
APO/FPO it is USPS until it gets to the APO/FPO, then it is military 
mail.  It never goes through the host country's mail system nor through 
their customs.  If I am mistaken, it won't be the first time, but when I 
was in the Navy, stationed overseas with an FPO address, it was US Mail 
to FPO San Fran, then military mail (without going through customs) to 
the destination. 
Jerry
jlronk wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: John Spencer
I first learned to enjoy espresso in Europe during business trips 
there.  The large strong mugs of cafe au lait in France for breakfast 
introduced me to latte.  Today, one of my business associates, a German 
who currently lives in the Bay Area, is very proud of the fine coffee 
that he makes in his office.   I believe that you will find the 
Europeans to be very open and excited to share their coffee with you.
If I had had that experience, then I would probably still be using my 
percolator with Yuban.
If you have never been over there, leave the coffee at home.  
Experience the local brew. Seek out local coffee houses.  'Enjoy the 
afternoon snack of coffee and cake.  Engage the proprietor or barista.  
Make coffee part of your experience.
Of course when I travel domestically taking my own coffee is worth it.  
I know the story here in the types of motels that I stay at.
John
On May 6, 2005, at 1:08 AM, zigzagmolly wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: jlronk
that's what i tho't but the postal service guy said that the mail was 
still subject to the host countries customs rules. same as no porn to 
iraq he said. it doesn't make much sense to me but i was in no real 
position to argue.
-jeff
Jerry Procopio wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: zigzagmolly
I never thought about them not letting coffee in, so I did a Google
search and went to the German customs site:http://www.zoll.de/english_version/b0_passenger_traffic/b0_third_country/a0=_free_of_duty/index.html
coffee, if the importer is at least 15 years old: 
500 g of coffee or
200 g of extracts, essences or concentrates of coffee or preparations
on the basis of these goods or on the basis of coffee
It looks like I will be able to bring in some if I want to.  My
husband is vetoing the idea, but we had to have some Starbucks's
coffee today as we had some waiting to do in a hospital. Why does it
always taste so burnt?  I doesn't matter what beans they use, they
scorch them all.  I am not sure we are going to survive 9 days without
some good coffee. Since I don't drink alcohol, I figure I'll hit the
bakeries hard and this makes good coffee a must.
I guess I should sleep on the plane, but I want to be able to go to
sleep around 8 hrs after we arrive in Germany, so we can start the
next day fresh.   Sleeping anywhere besides our waterbed with 2
featherbeds on top is one of my greatest concerns. I can feel my
shoulders and hips going numb just thinking about it.  I'm going to
have to do a search on taking medications with me.
  
My in-laws are taking their 3 "kids" (>50yrs old) and their spouses to
Germany for the 975th anniversary of the town of Padberg, which is my
husband's surname.  So everything is all planned out.  We are taking
the train tfrom Frankfurt to Kassel and then renting a car there. 
We'll spend the first 5 days driving around with relatives who are
German natives. They will fill us in on all the historical details and
we'll visit people who are very distantly related.  I've read the
book, so will be able to ask questions.  We will have a bit of time to
sit in the baths at Kassel and will see quite a bit of the Sauerland
and then back on the train to Bacharach for 2 nights and a trip down
the Rhine and then back to Frankfurt.   Mom and Dad are paying for it
all or we would be staying home.
So I won't be able to pick up an ebay purchased grinder anywhere.  I
am going to have to practice packing to see how much I will be able to
stuff in my bags.  My sister-in-law suggested taking old underwear and
leaving them there, but that only frees up a small space.
Actually, this is all a bit overwhelming.  I am a homebody who lives
in the mountains on 2 wooded acres as far away from civilization as I
can get.  I go to town for work and that's it.  I don't sleep well
away from home, I have hot flashes, I hate to sit for more than 15
minutes at a time.  I am trying to find comfort stuff to take with me
like books, binoculars, my field guides, my maps, a travel fan etc. so
I can relax. Coffee has been my substitute for cigarettes since I quit
smoking 17.5 years ago and I'd like to have that crutch, too.  Maybe
it will keep me occupied so I don't miss my granddaughter and worry
about disasters at home. We're flying over the Arctic and I know I
don't have enough survival to get us through if we crash land.    I
took Ativan the night before my last plane trip 10 yrs ago and was so
spaced the next morning,  I left my tickets on the counter at the
airport bagel shop. At least my husband will be my keeper.  We've been
married 30 yrs last month and have never been on a plane together.  I
ordered Xanax this time as it is a shorter acting med.  I'll stop
rambling now.  Thanks for letting me bend your ears and thanks for
your suggestions.  I'll send in a report on coffee in Germany.
Take care,
Nancy
On 5/6/05, jlronk  wrote:
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14) From: Gary Townsend
 zigzagmolly  wrote:
 I never thought about them not letting coffee in, so I did a Google
search and went to the German customs site:
 {snipped}
Nancy,
Hi! I was stationed in Germany for almost 5 years (95 -00. German
coffee is very good, and one of the reasons that I am so hooked on it
today! There are thousands of cafe's everywhere, and I can tell you
that you can get decent coffee everywhere! ( Stay away from vending
machine coffee, tho :-)
Part of the experience of living in Germany, i can remember the
morning stops for coffee, and getting coffee at the local bistro. Most
Germans speak very good English, and it's not too hard to order a cup
of coffee, anywhere you go. You can try and buy coffee in the
supermarkets, very easily. You may want to try to obtain a simple pour
over set up, ( cone & filter ). Enjoy your visit, I'd go back in a
minute!
Tchuss!!
Gary

15) From: zigzagmolly
Thanks,  Gary.  I will relax about it.  Maybe just take a some decaf
for evening use when we aren't near a cafe.
Take care,
Nancy
On 5/7/05, Gary Townsend  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Phil Ferrante-Roseberry
FWIW, I just got back from a trip to Australia, which has stringent 
controls about bringing in foods, raw wood products, and other things 
that may carry invasive pests. The customs guy asked me if I had 
anything that might be banned, and I told him I was carrying roasted 
coffee. After scratching his head for a few seconds, he said "You 
don't have any of that turkey jerky, ay?" and let me go after I 
assured him that I was jerky-less.
BTW - I had heard horror stories about the quality of coffee 
available in Australia, and was pleasantly surprised. Evidently 
coffee has become tres chic, and it's now hard to turn around without 
seeing the word 'cafe'. Some of them are pulling very respectable 
shots, too. (Check out Ground Zero in Manly Bay, north of Sydney.) 
It was also nice that Charbucks hasn't overrun the place yet, but I 
assume it's only a matter of time.
Phil

17) From: Neil Atwood
<Snip>
Now see, if you had just asked before travelling, us Aussies could have allayed your fears! ;-)
We are civilised 'down under' you know... perhaps reinforced by the fact that we had an excellent (female) barista in the recent world championships held in Seattle... You don't breed world class baristas without a degree of coffee culture in a country... ;-)
But we are very fussy about what kind of foods and other organic products people bring into the country. We have a heavily agriculture-dependant economy to protect.
Even sending green beans interstate to some areas of Oz requires me to declare what they are and where they are from...
Cheers
Neil A.
Sydney, Oz
<Snip>

18) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Neil Atwood  wrote:
<Snip>
 I met some Aussies at the SCAA convention in Seattle,
including Hazel, the world class barrista (and what a
cuty!). She gave me a bag of the espresso blend that she'd
brought with herfor the barrista contest, and it was a very
nice blend, indeed.
 If you should ever meet up with her, could you mention
thet "Oaxaca Charlie" would like to thank her, and find out
just what that blend consisted of? 
 Thanks,
  Charlie
                                         Oaxaca dreamin' 
Yahoo! Mail Mobile 
Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/learn/mail

19) From: Neil Atwood
Hazel is very good value indeed.
Some of us in Sydney were privileged to be hosted by Hazel for some 'coffee geek' Saturday afternoons, before she sold the shop...
Most coffee geek functions now seem to be on Sunday's which are not possible for me... but I doubt she would give up her blend secrets anyway!
Cheers
Neil A.
Sydney, Oz
<Snip>

20) From: Spencer Thomas
On 5/7/05, zigzagmolly  wrote:
<Snip>
Most flights to Europe arrive early in the morning, European time.  In
my experience, you adjust much more quickly, with less jet lag, if you
make yourself stay awake until sunset.  Get out in the sunlight for as
much of the day as you can.  Your brain needs the light to start
resetting your internal clock.  Napping during the day will just make
it harder to adapt, and you will definitely wake up at 2 or 3AM and be
unable to get back to sleep.
Try to sleep on the plane.  Go to sleep right after the meal. Don't
watch the movie.  Don't drink coffee for at least 12 hours ahead of
time. Earplugs and an eyeshade may be helpful, if you can tolerate
them.  Wear loose, comfortable clothing, because airplane seats are
hard enough to sleep in without your clothes chafing and binding.
Once you get to Germany, then you can indulge in coffee.
This works for me, anyway.
=Spencer

21) From: Jerry Procopio
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Is Vegemite a protected species? ;)
Jerry
Neil Atwood wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Brett Mason
Vegemite is protected via relocation to Australia.   Gotta watch out
for her cosin, Marmite...
Brett
On 5/9/05, Jerry Procopio  wrote:
<Snip>
available in
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
We are civilised 'down under' you know... perhaps
<Snip>
But we are
<Snip>
ng
<Snip>
Even sending green beans interstate to some areas of Oz requires me
<Snip>
Cheers
Neil A.
Sydney,
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
From:
<Snip>
admin] On Behalf Of Phil
<Snip>
Sent: Tuesday, 10 May 2005 7:31 AM
To:
<Snip>
Subject: Re: +Traveling to Germany...What
<Snip>
FWIW, I just got back from a trip to Australia, which has
<Snip>
controls about bringing in foods, raw wood products, and other
<Snip>
that may carry invasive pests. The customs guy asked me if I
<Snip>
anything that might be banned, and I told him I was carrying
<Snip>
coffee. After scratching his head for a few seconds, he said
<Snip>
don't have any of that turkey jerky, ay?" and let me go after I
assured
<Snip>
BTW - I had heard horror stories about the
<Snip>
available in Australia, and was pleasantly surprised.
<Snip>
coffee has become tres chic, and it's now hard to turn around
<Snip>
seeing the word 'cafe'. Some of them are pulling very
<Snip>
shots, too. (Check out Ground Zero in Manly Bay, north of
<Snip>
It was also nice that Charbucks hasn't overrun the place yet, but
<Snip>
assume it's only a matter of time.
Phil
 
<Snip>
homeroast
<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo
<Snip>
es)
<Snip>
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

23) From: Neil Atwood
Heathen!
Marmite is NO relation to the sacred Vegemite...
(Vege is a yeast extract, Marmite, beef... chalk and cheese)
And yes - Vege is a protected species here!
Neil A.
Sydney, Oz
<Snip>

24) From: John Mansfield
--Apple-Mail-3--1402713
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Absolutely not, Marmite is PURE vegetarian!
Marmite is directly related to Vegemite and ProMite and the New  
Zealand offshoot whose name I forget.
The other ingredients differ but they are all yeast based.
The beef stuff is Bovril and it is truly disgusting
-- 
John Mansfield PhD CPhys CSci MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 USA
Phone: (734) 936-3352
FAX (734) 763-2282
Cell. Phone: (734) 834-3913
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 834-3913)
Email: jfmjfm
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.htmlLocation: Lat. 42° 16' 48" Long. 83° 43' 48"
AIM: thejfmjfm
Yahoo: thejfmjfm
Skype: thejfmjfm
On May 10, 2005, at 12:21 PM, Steve M. Yalisove wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-3--1402713
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Absolutely not, Marmite is PURE =
vegetarian!Marmite is directly related to Vegemite and ProMite and =
the New Zealand offshoot whose name I forget.The other =
ingredients differ but they are all yeast based.The beef =
stuff is Bovril and it is truly disgusting

-- 

John Mansfield PhD CPhys CSci = MInstP

North = Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory

417 SRB, University of = Michigan

2455 = Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 USA

Phone: (734) 936-3352 

FAX (734) 763-2282 

Cell. Phone: (734) 834-3913

=

(Leaving a phone message at = 936-3352 is preferable to 834-3913)

Email: jfmjfm

URL:  Location: Lat. 42° 16' 48" =">http://e=malwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html

Location: Lat. 42° 16' 48" = Long. 83° 43' 48"

AIM: thejfmjfm

Yahoo: thejfmjfm

Skype: thejfmjfm


On May 10, = 2005, at 12:21 PM, Steve M. Yalisove wrote:
Is this true John?Steve Begin = forwarded message: = From: "Neil Atwood" <natwood>Date: = May 10, 2005 12:51:50 AM PDTTo: <homeroast= s.com>Subject: RE: +Traveling to Germany...What = about my coffee?Reply-To: homeroast= s.com Heathen! Marmite is NO relation to the sacred = Vegemite... (Vege is a yeast extract, Marmite, beef... chalk and = cheese) And yes - Vege is a protected species = here! Neil A.Sydney, = Oz

25) From: Francis Cashman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
BTW , Marmite is the UK version.  Developed during (I think) the First =
World War (they were really hungry I guess!!).
An Australian barista won the world championship a few years ago so we =
can do coffee!
Some reasonably good coffee is being produced on the East Coast and will =
only improve.
FC


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