HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New Mexico I-Roast profile (6 msgs / 222 lines)
1) From: Curt Garner
I don't know if this will work anywhere else, but I think that I've
finally gotten close to a very workable profile here in the Land of
Enchantment.
The coffee is fabulous, and is what I dreamt of when I got the "bug"
to start roasting. The origin flavors are distinct, and wonderful.
The profile:
5:00 @ 400
2:00 @ 410
2:00 @ 425
The load: 150 gr.
The thermometer: digital thermocouple into a slightly enlarged hole in the =
cap.
The machine: at room temp. (cold)
My electrical voltage:
This produces a roast that is in the C+ to FC+R range, depending on
the bean. I then either increase the final temp, or decrease the final
temp to achieve the desired roast level.
My machine (12/04) has a warmup phase that lasts about 2 1/2 to 3
minutes, so it's as if I'm getting four different settings.
Phase I warms the bean (about 3:00/337F), then ramps up to near the
first crack temp.
Phase II takes the bean near the end of first crack.
Phase III finishes.
This typically give me 3-4 minutes between the start of first and the
start of second, with a well defined interval between cracks.
I note that a shorter phase III usually makes the bean taste burnt,
without a corresponding roast level, and a longer phase III tastes
baked (yuck!!!).
Very lights roasts may benefit from a slightly longer Phase I, but I'm
still experimenting with this.
I'm currently letting all loads go to the full 9:00 of the profile,
and varying the Phase III to vary the amount of roast.
Enjoy, and good luck --- back to lurking.
Curt

2) From: Brett Mason
Does it matter which bean you roast?
Brett
On 5/10/05, Curt Garner  wrote:
<Snip>
e cap.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
Excellent I-Roast profile discussion Curt. Thanks for sharing your 
experiences. Stay de-lurked more! I have no comments or input since I don't 
I-Roast though I roast;-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmFrom: "Curt Garner" 
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2005 9:27 PM
<Snip>
finally gotten close to a very workable profile here in the Land of
Enchantment.
The coffee is fabulous, and is what I dreamt of when I got the "bug"
to start roasting. The origin flavors are distinct, and wonderful.
The profile:
5:00 @ 400
2:00 @ 410
2:00 @ 425
The load: 150 gr.
The thermometer: digital thermocouple into a slightly enlarged hole in the 
cap.
The machine: at room temp. (cold)
My electrical voltage:
This produces a roast that is in the C+ to FC+R range, depending on
the bean. I then either increase the final temp, or decrease the final
temp to achieve the desired roast level.
My machine (12/04) has a warmup phase that lasts about 2 1/2 to 3
minutes, so it's as if I'm getting four different settings.
Phase I warms the bean (about 3:00/337F), then ramps up to near the
first crack temp.
Phase II takes the bean near the end of first crack.
Phase III finishes.
This typically give me 3-4 minutes between the start of first and the
start of second, with a well defined interval between cracks.
I note that a shorter phase III usually makes the bean taste burnt,
without a corresponding roast level, and a longer phase III tastes
baked (yuck!!!).
Very lights roasts may benefit from a slightly longer Phase I, but I'm
still experimenting with this.
I'm currently letting all loads go to the full 9:00 of the profile,
and varying the Phase III to vary the amount of roast.
Enjoy, and good luck --- back to lurking.
Curt

4) From: Dwayne Walker
Hi Curt
Very interesting I am also adjusting the roast mostly by adjusting the  
final temperature. I live in Central Missouri which is quite a different  
environment. I was wondering about some environmental variables at your  
location just to get a reference. What is your elevation above Sea level?  
if you know it. and what Is your average humidity there?
My elevation here is 738ft and the humidity swings wildly but it typically  
between 80% to 90%.
Dwayne
On Tue, 10 May 2005 23:27:09 -0500, Curt Garner   
wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Curt Garner
The 5-400, 2-410, 2-425 seems to get me to a drinkable roast. I can
then either go up or down on the final temp to suit my taste. For
example:
Oaxaca: 5-400, 2-410, 2-450 got FC+
Columbian: 5-400, 2-410, 2-430 got FC+
Yerg: 5-400, 2-410, 2-430 got FC
Kenyan Karatina: 5-400, 2-410, 2-430 got FC-FC+
Fair Trade Harar : 5-400, 2-410, 2-425 got FC+
Brazil Ipanema: 5-400, 2-410, 2-440 got FC+
Aged Sumatra Lintong: 5-400, 2-410, 4-460 got V+
I've only been using this basic profile for about a week and a half,
but it seems to give me a starting point for further refinement.
My first global profile stab was at 5-400, 2-410, 2-430, but this
seemed to push a couple of beans a bit too far into second for my
taste, so I dropped it down to 425, and it seemed better. I'm thinking
that for beans such as the Centrals, or Mexicans, that a 430 starting
point might be better.
My idea is to be able to try a pound of something to see if I'd like
to order more, and use the first, or perhaps the second roast to dial
into its specific character, and then be able to make a reasonable
judgement of my preference by the time I get to the third roast.
Curt

6) From: Curt Garner
Lots different here ... we're at 5000 feet, and an average day will be
at 15-25% humidity, so I imagine that it would take a bit longer to
hit the same temps.
I put a spring from true value between the chaff guard and the lid,
and drilled out enough of a hole to allow me to stick the end of my
digital thermocouple into the lid. I'm averaging about 370F by the end
of the first stage, and 395-400F by the end of the second.
With that setup, with my environmental factors, and depending on the
bean, First Crack seems to happen at around 380-390, although some
beans are higher (the Harar I roasted last night was nearly 400 before
it hit FC.), or lower. Second crack seems to happen between 425 and
432 on my machine.
I think that since this is a fluid process that the optimal time, once
discovered  should generaly be kept fairly constant, and that the heat
level should be adjusted to cause the desired outcome, although I
wonder if your increased humidity may be a factor and may necessitate
a longer phase time.
It seems a tricky balance between carmelization and malliard reactions.
Please post the results of your experience.
Curt


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