HomeRoast Digest


Topic: "Roughing It" (26 msgs / 511 lines)
1) From: Andrew Bowman
 
I know, to some extent, that people have discussed this topic here before 
and I have gotten a couple of good ideas, but I thought I would ask for a 
little more info...
Does anyone have a particular method for making their coffee on the road or 
in the great outdoors?  I'm hoping to do a lot of camping/traveling this 
summer and I'm making it my goal to drink coffee the same way I do now (by 
that I mean frequently and with my roasted coffee).  I plan to try new ways 
of doing this  and have even more new coffee adventures and am open to 
anything (even excited about cowboy coffee)!  Roasting?  Storing?  Grinding? 
Brewing?  Consuming?  Whatever!   So let me know if you have any input or 
stories, or anything you can relate to this topic!!!
Thanks!!!
Andy
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail athttp://www.hotmail.com

2) From: Spencer W. Thomas
Well, I can't help you with roasting.  But I did have a couple of back-to-back
trips recently, and what I did was to take along some freshly roasted and ground
coffee, in one of Tom's "valve" bags.  And I got the "french press in a travel
cup" from Starbucks.
Hot water, ground coffee, wait, press, drink.  Ahhh!
Much better than hotel coffee, anyway.
=Spencer
Andrew Bowman wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Tim Culver
<Snip>
ab> Does anyone have a particular method for making their coffee on
ab> the road or in the great outdoors?  I'm hoping to do a lot of
ab> camping/traveling this summer and I'm making it my goal to drink
ab> coffee the same way I do now (by that I mean frequently and with
ab> my roasted coffee).  I plan to try new ways of doing this and have
ab> even more new coffee adventures and am open to anything (even
ab> excited about cowboy coffee)!  Roasting?  Storing?  Grinding?
ab> Brewing?  Consuming?  Whatever!  So let me know if you have any
ab> input or stories, or anything you can relate to this topic!!!
I did electricity-free coffee for a Y2K party.  Roast peaberries in a
pan over your kerosene stove.  Grind with a handmill.  Boil water on
the stove and press.  Dead easy, and tasted great with no practice.
For a coffee, I'd recommend a peaberry, so that it rolls around more
freely in the pan.  Consider a Colombian or Mexican that doesn't
require a particular roast, so it's more forgiving.
-- 
Tim Culver
Chapel Hill, NC ... popper ... trespade ... press pot

4) From: drg
Andrew Bowman Asked:
<Snip>
I find the French Press the best road and field brewer.  With a hand grinder
you can have the fresh ground coffee and if you are in the field long
enough, a pan over the fire will fresh roast the beans.
At home, I'd put the French Press third after a decent espresso pump machine
and a vacuum pot.
      Wok on Wood.
       Jim Gundlach

5) From: Richard
I use an aluminum one tasse moka pot. I've been allowing myself the
luxury of a pseudo espresso on the way back while cleaning up camp on my
recent trips. Since my trips tend to be 2 or three days, I pre-grind
just enough coffee for the pot put it in a zip lock and carry it along.
Works fine.
My 2 cents worth.
Richard
Andrew Bowman wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Richard Schwaninger
"The mountain is yours only after you return, until then, you belong to
the mountain."
H. Kammerlander

6) From: Paul Goelz
<Snip>
We camp (in a pop-up lately) at various music festivals in the summer, and
we always have coffee in the morning before things get going.  We take
along enough whole bean home roast to last the duration.  We grind it
before each brew, and brew in a Nissan thermal presspot.  Tastes just like
at home, but we get some kidding about how much fuss we go to....
Until this year, we have been storing the beans in an ice chest or more
recently in the camper refrigerator.  From now on though, unless it is
beastly hot I plan on storing them at ambient temperature..... I like the
way the beans tase when developed at room temperature instead of in the
fridge.  Especially Yemen Moka Ismali.  
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
Videoastronomy and music web site:http://www.eaglequest.com/~pgoelz

7) From: Robert Cantor
Eastern mountain sports in Chicago carries two sizes of plastic French Presses.  Bring a hand grinder or pre-grind per your own pref
erences.  Tom sells a bunch of great hand grinders and also had a plastic one that, while not as accurate, is indestructable.  Maybe
he can direct you to a source.  For pre-grinding I'm not convinced a valve bag will do any better than a ziplock (for this set of ci
rcumstances only). Others have already told you about roasting.   You're all set.   :)
Bob C.
rcantor

8) From: Bryce Decker
Andy, what wort of camping outfit will you be taking with you?   That will
determine how to advise you.  Backpacking with a tiny gas stove is a whole
lot more constraining to coffee brewing methods than life in a pickup
camper.    -Bryce

9) From: Andrew Bowman
 
Bryce,
I am still in the preliminary stages of planning our first trip for the 
summer, but we will be packing.  No campers, SUVs, cabins, or anything 
beyond tents and campfires.  We might aquire a stove but I haven't decided 
if I want to take one or not.
Thanks for the informative responses so far.
Andy
----Original Message Follows----
From: Bryce Decker 
Reply-To: homeroast
To: "INTERNET:homeroast" 
Subject: + "Roughing It"
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 2000 15:01:01 -0400
Andy, what wort of camping outfit will you be taking with you?   That will
determine how to advise you.  Backpacking with a tiny gas stove is a whole
lot more constraining to coffee brewing methods than life in a pickup
camper.    -Bryce
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail athttp://www.hotmail.com

10) From: Andrew Bowman
 
Just curious...Where did you find a Nissan thermal presspot?  Or did you 
mean a combonation of Nissan thermos and presspot.
Also, by the way, I just got a free pound of Peet's coffee in the mail which 
I wasn't quite expecting and can't possibly consume right away because I 
have a bunch of my coffee already roasted so I stuck it in the freezer.  
Never done this before (freezing coffee).  Should be interesting.  Also, 
I've never had Peet's before so it will be nice to see what the fuss is 
about!
As for people having a laugh at you for your obsessive coffee 
ways...well...who is the happier camper?
            Andy
----Original Message Follows----
From: Paul Goelz 
Reply-To: homeroast
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: + "Roughing It"
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 2000 13:44:50 -0400
 >Does anyone have a particular method for making their coffee on the road 
or
 >in the great outdoors?
We camp (in a pop-up lately) at various music festivals in the summer, and
we always have coffee in the morning before things get going.  We take
along enough whole bean home roast to last the duration.  We grind it
before each brew, and brew in a Nissan thermal presspot.  Tastes just like
at home, but we get some kidding about how much fuss we go to....
Until this year, we have been storing the beans in an ice chest or more
recently in the camper refrigerator.  From now on though, unless it is
beastly hot I plan on storing them at ambient temperature..... I like the
way the beans tase when developed at room temperature instead of in the
fridge.  Especially Yemen Moka Ismali.
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
pgoelz at eaglequest dot com
Videoastronomy and music web site:http://www.hotmail.com">http://www.eaglequest.com/~pgoelzGet Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail athttp://www.hotmail.com

11) From: Richard
Andrew Bowman wrote:
<Snip>
Happier or more content? I would assume those laughing are happier.
Sorry.
Robusta Richard
-- 
Richard Schwaninger
"The mountain is yours only after you return, until then, you belong to
the mountain."
H. Kammerlander

12) From: Bryce Decker
Message text written by INTERNET:homeroast
<Snip>
I am still in the preliminary stages of planning our first trip for the 
summer, but we will be packing.  No campers, SUVs, cabins, or anything 
beyond tents and campfires.  We might aquire a stove but I haven't decided 
if I want to take one or not.
Thanks for the informative responses so far.
Andy<
        If you are carrying everything on your back, some compromises with
a gourmet's soul are called for.  The extra weight and bulk of a hand
grinder and a French press might  be more than you want to pack.  If you
leave them behind,  roast, rest, and coarse (french press calibre) grind
your coffee before you leave and keep the coffee scrupulously away from the
open air in ziploc or screw down plastic containers.  If you'll be on the
trail for many days, favor several containers over a single large one.
        Cowboy coffee is easy.  Bring the water to a boil in a pan.  Take
the pan off the fire and pour the coffee into the water and let it steep in
the pan.  Decant it into cups through a strainer.  Strainers don't weigh
much and keep grounds out of your teeth.  
        Roasting in an open pan is a bit trickier, but it is done by folks
in the third world every day.  Trouble is, for best results you need a
heavy heat-holding cast iron skillet or a high-sided chicken fryer --
hardly practical for packing on your back.  Also, the small heating source
on a portable back packer's stove makes it hard to concentrate enough heat
to do justice to a coffee-roasting job.  You need the intense heat of a
deep bed of coals from a wood fire, or the generous flame from a
kitchen-sized gas stove.  Stir the beans without stopping until they begin
to smoke.  At that point, ideally no longer than about 20 minutes max,  you
will want to pay very close attention to the color and appearance of the
beans to make sure they look like the roast you like.  Think ahead about
how you will cool the beans quickly.  The beans will not roast uniformly
under these conditions.    Take gloves or use a wooden spoon to stir with. 
         It will  not be a perfect roast, but in camp, it will taste good
anyway.
        Good camping.  I'm too old to back pack anymore, but I am with you
in spirit.  
                Cheers,  -Bryce

13) From: G. Dyer
I handgrind (zassenhaus mill) a "recent roast" and brew in a Bodum Press
pot. The concensus here looks like they agree! It beats percolated, or drip,
a vacuum is too much to carry and subject to break, roasting consumes too
much time, no electricity pretty much rules out an electric pump espresso, a
lever espresso is too heavy anyway, and again lack of electricity rules out
electric grinding on the trail. Fresh roast lasts a week easily at ambient
temperatures sealed in a bag or jar. Roasting is probably too time consuming
as other activities are planned and equipment is at a minimum.
 Handgrind, boil water, press pot is about all the time and equipment I can
afford.

14) From: Dave Clark
"G. Dyer" wrote:
<Snip>
That's my plan when I go camping. A friend is having a wedding at
City Park here in Austin in May. Nice place right on Lake Austin, it's 
a wedding campout, because that's the kind of folks they are. Last time
we were camping, (well they were, I was visiting) at the Bluegrass 
Festival in Dripping Springs (another nice place), he pulled out the 
Bodum Press Pot and I was bummed that I didn't even think of bringing 
some fresh roasted beans for them. This time I'm camping out and 
bringing lots of Hamburgo, and beer and tequila, too. ;o)
-- 
Dave Clark                                             Austin, Texashttp://www.jump.net/~davec                            N 30d 27.526m
mailto:davec                                  W 97d 48.826m
     Bills travel through the mail at twice the speed of checks.

15) From: bob huntsman
deadheads makin' fanTAStic coffee in the parking lot!!!
irie,
--cap'n bob
Paul Goelz wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Prabhakar Ragde
<Snip>
Ha, ha. This is what I always do with Peet's coffee, since I visit
Berkeley once or twice a year but don't live there! --PR

17) From: Mandy Willison
Hi, PR, ironically enough I can go with this thread ( I have 500 posts I
want to  read so I am quickly reading this )
I have not much to report on that SCAA. They seemed to think it was the
biggest in the world this year. I 'roughed' it catching and absorbing
anything fresh and lots of frozen stuff (coffee people!)
My summary is that I have learnt more on this list than any gathering of
legendary coffee officiandos and believe me they had my full attention.-
bean'wild!

18) From: Mandy Willison
<Snip>
or
<Snip>
<Snip>
Does this mean you were Greatful?!
-Toms turkish grinder, (still going strong after being dropped 2 stories
onto concrete) Dick Heggs' glass poppered leftover yerg he didnt wanna
roast, wood fired melted snow thru swiss gold filter - ye ha this was hardly
roughing it!
  -bean'wild! in the wilds.

19) From: Scott
I saw this advertised in Coffee Journal a few years ago... never tried it:

20) From: Bill Wiltschko
I have tried this, and it is now a must-carry for me for all camping
trips.  It's more insulated than a regular coffee cup and most other
insulated cups (because of the top) and it makes good coffee better than
Melitta-in-the-wild.  The only  drawback is that it is made of
plastic, which means that if you don't drink the coffee pretty fast, the
last of the cup will have an "old" taste. 
I ought to try the non-plastic plunger-cup also shown on the link below,
although I probably would stick to the plastic version for
backpacking.
Bill
At 07:42 AM 4/26/00, you wrote:
I saw this advertised in Coffee Journal a few
years ago... never tried it:
<http://www.bigskybistro.com/>Bill Wiltschko
bill
http://www.wiltschko.org/coffee.htm

21) From: Prabhakar Ragde
<Snip>
That's good to hear, for someone who isn't about to make an SCAA any
time soon. --PR

22) From: Robert Cantor
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
I dunno about leaving the coffee on the grounds 
while drinking it.   Every time you tilt the cup, the liquid in the 
top part will mix with the liquid in the bottom.  If you linger tem min 
over a cup, then that's 14 min old grounds you're still extracting.   
I use a plastic press and pour off the brew. 
 
Chacun a son gout!
 
 
Bob C.
rcantor

23) From: J. Paul Sheridan, III
Grateful!

24) From: Andrew Bowman
 
<Snip>
anyway.
         Good camping.  I'm too old to back pack anymore, but I am with you
in spirit.
                 Cheers,  -Bryce<<<<<<<<
Thanks Bryce,
That first, uneven, gnarly lookin', early morning (or late night) roast will 
be in your honour my man.
Andy
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail athttp://www.hotmail.com

25) From: Scott Jensen
Last time we went camping I took the Zassenhaus and my swiss gold single
cup.  It was incredible coffee,  I really enjoyed the swiss gold, of course
it only made one cup at a time!
We were camping at a state park so we had a campstove and a tea pot, and
the zass's weight didn't matter.  I think though the swiss gold single cup
would be excellent for backpacking.
Scott

26) From: Bill Wiltschko
At 11:25 AM 4/25/00, you wrote:
Eastern mountain sports in Chicago carries two
sizes of plastic French Presses.  Bring a hand grinder or pre-grind
per your own pref
erences.  Tom sells a bunch of great hand grinders and also had a
plastic one that, while not as accurate, is indestructable. 
Maybe
he can direct you to a source.  For pre-grinding I'm not convinced a
valve bag will do any better than a ziplock (for this set of ci
rcumstances only). Others have already told you about
roasting.   You're all set.   :)
Since I'm in Seattle at the moment, I decided to check out the REI master
store. Great store, by the way.  They also have two sizes of French
Presses,made of Lexan by GSI. They also carry something called a
"Cup-pourri" coffee steeper for $5.  This device is like a
loose tea steeper,except that the mesh is smaller sized to accommodate
coffee grounds.  This steeper makes a lot of sense, but I won't be
able to give it a good test until next week.
Bill
Bill Wiltschko
bill
http://www.wiltschko.org/coffee.htm


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