HomeRoast Digest


Topic: a day without coffee (2 msgs / 95 lines)
1) From: akkmom
Spent a lot of time writing and rewriting this, so if it's too long, please delete.  Sorry for the rambling, but I spent the better part of two days at the Hilton Hotel in Harrisburg, PA attending a criminal law continuing education symposium so I can continue in the practice of law for another year.  The first thing I note, not for the first time, and with all due respect to any lawyers lurking on the list, is that lawyers as a general rule are a weird looking group.  Put 500 or so of them in a confined space and watch out...  
But on to the coffee part of things.  Attached to the Hilton is a shopping center of sorts called Strawberry Square (for reasons unknown to me, Harrisburg has adopted a strawberry as it's official fruit - they drop a giant one on New Years Eve, which seems weird until you learn that Falmouth, PA drops a goat - maybe it's a Pennsylvania thing).  In this center is a shoe shine place, a B Dalton bookseller, a GNC, a Smith Barney investment firm, and a food court.  A few other stores, but I'm never been to them, so I couldn't tell you what they are. There used to be a coffee shop that made passable brewed coffee - not the best but definitely drinkable.  Running late, but that's okay, because there's passable brewed coffee waiting for me in Strawberry Square, right?
The first thing I notice when I get off the elevator is that directly in front of me is a *$.  Wasn't there a year ago, so this is a recent development.  And sure enough, the Deli Bean or Coffee Bean or whatever it was that sold passable coffee, is empty.  Just a sign in the windows thanking customers for their loyalty and support.  Sad.  That's okay - I can survive until lunch without coffee, right?
First three hours (that's right, three, with one 20 minute break) are updates on changes to criminal case law and statutes.  Not the most fascinating subjects, but at least the speakers are decent and know their stuff.  I'm so tired when it ends, I just go to my car in the parking deck and take a nap - a nap and no coffee because the smell from the *$ is awful.  But I get a nap, so that should keep me until the afternoon, right.  I'm not that much of an addict, am I?
Back from lunch.  I walk into what I think is a lecture on "Zen and the art of Criminal Defense" - maybe they'll throw some motorcycle maintenance into the mix, who knows.  But wait - this is the wrong room - they've already started and there are only 10 people in the room (which should have tipped me off, but I'm not the most observant of people as evidenced by my walking into the wrong lecture and not realizing it for 5 minutes).  The subject is "the electronic courtroom," which turns out to be an even less interesting subject than the title would indicate.   Wow - did you know that if you use a projector and show the jury pretty pictures and bulleted sentences of three words, you can trick them into thinking your client is innocent?  Bet you didn't.  
My head starts to ache from the lack of caffeine.  I'm drifting off.  Wait - everyone is clapping.  Does that mean I can leave?  The next hour is on auto stops - what's new in 2005?  I don't know and I don't really care - bottom line, if the police ask to search your car, say no.  Especially if you're carrying two pounds of heroin in the trunk...
Last lecture - the dreaded ethics hour.  Not dreaded because I have none, but because I follow the tried and true philosophy of "if you have to ask whether you can do something you probably can't."  
Okay - so I go to *$.  I can't stop myself.  It smells terrible, but it should keep me awake.  I get some Ethiopian coffee that is described as "lemony."  Okay, I like lemon, but not in my coffee.  First sip is so hot, I can't really taste anything.  Which is good, because the point is to get my fix of caffeine, not to actually taste anything.  As it cools, I detect a sourness - maybe that's the lemon? - and try not to make faces as I consume it.  While lawyers are a strange bunch, most of them would notice my mouth contorting as I drink something from a paper cup.  It's terrible coffee, but the headache is receding, and my day is finally over, so I can now go home and drink some home roast.
The lessons to be learned?  1) Never take Sweet Marias for granted, and be grateful for the supply of great beans I can roast to support my habit; 2) remember to set the alarm so I have time to make my own coffee in the morning; and 3) never let the police search your car if you have drugs anywhere inside (I can't stress this last one enough).
Tara
Spent a lot of time writing and rewriting this, so if it's too long, please delete.  Sorry for the rambling, but I spent the better part of two days at the Hilton Hotel in Harrisburg, PA attending a criminal law continuing education symposium so I can continue in the practice of law for another year.  The first thing I note, not for the first time, and with all due respect to any lawyers lurking on the list, is that lawyers as a general rule are a weird looking group.  Put 500 or so of them in a confined space and watch out...  
 
But on to the coffee part of things.  Attached to the Hilton is a shopping center of sorts called Strawberry Square (for reasons unknown to me, Harrisburg has adopted a strawberry as it's official fruit - they drop a giant one on New Years Eve, which seems weird until you learn that Falmouth, PA drops a goat - maybe it's a Pennsylvania thing).  In this center is a shoe shine place, a B Dalton bookseller, a GNC, a Smith Barney investment firm, and a food court.  A few other stores, but I'm never been to them, so I couldn't tell you what they are. There used to be a coffee shop that made passable brewed coffee - not the best but definitely drinkable.  Running late, but that's okay, because there's passable brewed coffee waiting for me in Strawberry Square, right?
 
The first thing I notice when I get off the elevator is that directly in front of me is a *$.  Wasn't there a year ago, so this is a recent development.  And sure enough, the Deli Bean or Coffee Bean or whatever it was that sold passable coffee, is empty.  Just a sign in the windows thanking customers for their loyalty and support.  Sad.  That's okay - I can survive until lunch without coffee, right?
 
First three hours (that's right, three, with one 20 minute break) are updates on changes to criminal case law and statutes.  Not the most fascinating subjects, but at least the speakers are decent and know their stuff.  I'm so tired when it ends, I just go to my car in the parking deck and take a nap - a nap and no coffee because the smell from the *$ is awful.  But I get a nap, so that should keep me until the afternoon, right.  I'm not that much of an addict, am I?
 
Back from lunch.  I walk into what I think is a lecture on "Zen and the art of Criminal Defense" - maybe they'll throw some motorcycle maintenance into the mix, who knows.  But wait - this is the wrong room - they've already started and there are only 10 people in the room (which should have tipped me off, but I'm not the most observant of people as evidenced by my walking into the wrong lecture and not realizing it for 5 minutes).  The subject is "the electronic courtroom," which turns out to be an even less interesting subject than the title would indicate.   Wow - did you know that if you use a projector and show the jury pretty pictures and bulleted sentences of three words, you can trick them into thinking your client is innocent?  Bet you didn't.  
 
My head starts to ache from the lack of caffeine.  I'm drifting off.  Wait - everyone is clapping.  Does that mean I can leave?  The next hour is on auto stops - what's new in 2005?  I don't know and I don't really care - bottom line, if the police ask to search your car, say no.  Especially if you're carrying two pounds of heroin in the trunk...
 
Last lecture - the dreaded ethics hour.  Not dreaded because I have none, but because I follow the tried and true philosophy of "if you have to ask whether you can do something you probably can't."  
Okay - so I go to *$.  I can't stop myself.  It smells terrible, but it should keep me awake.  I get some Ethiopian coffee that is described as "lemony."  Okay, I like lemon, but not in my coffee.  First sip is so hot, I can't really taste anything.  Which is good, because the point is to get my fix of caffeine, not to actually taste anything.  As it cools, I detect a sourness - maybe that's the lemon? - and try not to make faces as I consume it.  While lawyers are a strange bunch, most of them would notice my mouth contorting as I drink something from a paper cup.  It's terrible coffee, but the headache is receding, and my day is finally over, so I can now go home and drink some home roast.
 
The lessons to be learned?  1) Never take Sweet Marias for granted, and be grateful for the supply of great beans I can roast to support my habit; 2) remember to set the alarm so I have time to make my own coffee in the morning; and 3) never let the police search your car if you have drugs anywhere inside (I can't stress this last one enough).
 
Tara

2) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Tara,
The lack of good coffee aside, thanks for sharing.  An attorney with a
nice, dry (nee, lemony?) sense of humor is a rarity.  Having worked
with attorneys for nearly 20 years, I can attest to your observation
of the weird looking group (said with much love and with no intent to
defame and/or assault any legal type person).
Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to go out to my car.  I think I left
some uh, coffee, yeah, coffee in the trunk.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
For a Drip/Moka/Presspot Brew
On 6/6/05, akkmom  wrote:
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