HomeRoast Digest


Topic: RK Drums (27 msgs / 806 lines)
1) From: ginny
it is Gary,
get one, you will love it.
g

2) From: akkmom
Okay - so I finally figured out what RK drums were by reading todays posts - I'm slow sometimes.  Went to Ron's site - these are really cool, I must say.  Saving up for an espresso machine upgrade, but definitely something to think about when my FR dies...
Tara
Okay - so I finally figured out what RK drums were by reading todays posts - I'm slow sometimes.  Went to Ron's site - these are really cool, I must say.  Saving up for an espresso machine upgrade, but definitely something to think about when my FR dies...
Tara

3) From: Gary Townsend
For a little less than a new set of tires for my Chevy PU truck, I
could have a really nice 4# drum roaster? Say it isn't so!http://rkdrums.com/Ron, 
I was looking at your website, and started daydreaming about your 4 #
homeroaster setup. Nice website !!!
All you ever wanted to know about BBQ Drum roasting and more! 
Hmmm, I wonder how I could get this purchase past my significant other?
Think that you could put down *truck tires* on the invoice?  ;-)
I can already picture myself drum roasting under my front porch on a
Sat morning @ 7am, watching the family of squirrels rob the bird
feeder...while sipping from my stone coffee cup....

4) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
could have a really nice 4# drum roaster? Say it isn't so!
Gary I don't believe I have ever heard it put that way. Yes I like it, one
could drive a bit slower to get that extra mile out of the old set and
stretch it out until you sold enough coffee to buy new tires.
Do you think  she might buy that theory? NAW:O)
RK

5) From: akkmom
I think a drum roaster is a far better investment than a car - I could swap a low mileage Land Rover Freelander for one - it's waiting right out in the driveway for the Land Rover people to tow it away for servicing...  It doesn't run a lot of the time, but when it does, it drives through anything...
Tara
---------

6) From: Gary Townsend
On 6/15/05, ginny  wrote:
<Snip>
Ginny, 
I really want one...just that funding, at the moment, is stopping me.
Our household budget is tied up until the end of June :-( as we have
family coming in from NY or a week to attend my Army retirement
ceremony on the 29th of June.
However, I can foresee this purchase passing the month of July's budget ;-)
Gary....on my way to deal with bureaucratic paperwork as only the Army
can do it...probably clearcut an acre of prime forest just to process
all my paperwork over the next 2 weeks.

7) From: Charles Cowdrick
Got to agree. If you do buy one, I'd suggest getting a smaller  
Charbroil grill (say, $119). I got seduced into buying a larger  
stainless grill because it was on sale. But, it does take more gas to  
roast with it than the smaller units, and the spit assembly works  
better, I think, on the smaller units. Whatever.  That said, if you  
keep her level and buy the RK motor assembly, too, you'll have  
wonderfully even, delicious roasts. I've done many 4-lb and some 3-lb  
roasts and am very happy with the setup, with the exception that I'm  
always worried about running out of gas. For 1 lb and smaller roasts  
I use a San Franciscan sample roaster that's natural gas fed which  
probably explains my paranoia about propane tanks. In any case, you  
should read the reviews of RK Drum on Coffeegeek.com. All the best,  
Charles
On Jun 15, 2005, at 11:03 AM, ginny wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Jeff Oien
Charles Cowdrick wrote:
<Snip>
I wonder if in the long run it would be better for us cold weather
people to have a small grill for warm weather and a more powerful
grill for cold (down to 10 degrees) weather. ?
JeffO

9) From: Charles Cowdrick
On Jun 15, 2005, at 2:23 PM, Jeff Oien wrote:
<Snip>
Good point, Jeff. Well, if you could buy a 55,000 BTU in a small  
unit, that would be perfect. Most small grills are around 35000 but  
have flimsy burn units compared to the big boys. However, they don't  
have to heat up as many cubic inches, either. When I started outdoor  
roasting, the ambient temp was around 40-degrees. I'm getting the  
same roast times at 85-degrees (but of course it doesn't take the  
unit as long to get to my 350-degree start time).

10) From: Peter Zulkowski
This is more on the topic of the grill  that heats the RK Drum.
Someone mentioned earlier that they were concerned about running out of 
gas in the middle of a roast. This has bothered me with just plain 
grilling steaks, although it would not be as much as a problem there. 
What I usually do is change to a new bottle when I "think" the old one 
may be low, then get the nearly empty one refilled.
The question I have about the grill is concerning heat loss. Has anyone 
lined the grill with Furnace insulation? Seems to me this would save a 
lot of gas, and make temperature control better also.
There are several reasons I have stayed with electricity for roasting, 
not the least of which has been the refilling the propane bottle 
problem. But wasting all that heat with a gas grill has been an issue 
for me also. If the grill were insulated I bet the temperature would be 
more nearly the same from top to bottom and side to side as well.
If I were to buy a drum from Ron I think I would get the 57 RPM motor 
also, no need to reinvent that, but perhaps I would get a  scrap grill 
from a thrift store, insulate it,
buy a new burner/regulator if needed, and put tiles with holes in them 
just below the drum, like someone else on the list has suggested.
Has anyone tried an insulated grill setup? Does that interfere with 
hearing the cracks?
Comments and advice welcome.
PeterZ
About to go out on the porch and roast with my PGR, where it is only 
105F in the shade, here in LHC.
Charles Cowdrick wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Gene Smith
As far as RK drums vs truck tires goes, it's important to remember that 
those 4 $50.00 tires somehow always end up costing over $300.00. in my 
experience...
Gene Smith
threading the wild learning curve, in Houston

12) From: Rich Adams
As soon as I see the right price on some ceramic refractory sheets.
Rich Adams

13) From: Peter Zulkowski
I was thinking of using this stuff:http://www.infraredheaters.com/insulati.htmProbably would have to surface it with Aluminum foil or flashing, to 
keep it from absorbing coffee oils.
PeterZ
Just finished a batch of Nicaraguan Decaf to Full City, here in LHC.
Rich Adams wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: miKe mcKoffee
From: "Jeff Oien" 
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2005 11:23 AM
<Snip>
Doesn't make sense to me. Get what you need for cold weather BTU wise, just 
turn the knob up less during the summer... From a thermal standpoint smaller 
cavity likely better, and insulation would help. Doesn't need to permanently 
installed, could be a fire proof thermal blanket on the outside. Some well 
below freezing low & slow smoker type people use exterior thermal wrap of 
one sort or another, though temps of course much lower than coffee roasting 
so just make sure it's temp rated high enough.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
3rd Annual Pacific Northwest Sweet Maria's Home Roasters Gathering infohttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/pnwgIII.htmURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

15) From: Rich Adams
Any BBQ roasters out there want to split up a full roll?
Rich Adams

16) From: miKe mcKoffee
From: "Rich Adams" 
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2005 2:19 PM
<Snip>
That 2300f rating will definitely handle the coffee roasting heat!
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
3rd Annual Pacific Northwest Sweet Maria's Home Roasters Gathering infohttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/pnwgIII.htmURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

17) From: Gary Townsend
Mine run $100. each :-O
On 6/15/05, Gene Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

18) From: Pat Murray
Hello All,
I have been roasting for a little less than a year now and graduated from
Whirley pop to dual variac Poppery l.  Then around xmas my wife bought me an
RK Drum with the 57 rpm motor.  I am still in the Newbie drum roaster
classification, and after about 20 roasts I am starting to get it.
I want to take a minute and advise anyone who is thinking about upgrading to
an RK Drum to not hesitate.  The quality of the drum is great, and the
quality of the roasted beans is great.  The only thing better than that is
the quality of Ron Kyle's service!!!  Every week I email him with a new
installment of my most recent roasting attempt.  Every week he replies with
caring, helpful suggestions and welcomes me to "keep him posted" on how the
roasting is going.  It is that kind of dedication and support that help
build a roasting community and email list like this one.  Ron deserves a
round of applause.
Thank You,
Pat

19) From: Craig Groendyk
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Pat,
      You may be just the person I need advice from.  I am about to =
order an RK Drum and join the ranks of homeroasters. To date I've been =
purchasing fresh roasted coffee from Cafe Fresco over the net or Bongo =
Java in Nashville. I have a Silvia / Rocky setup (PID from Jim Gallt =
added). I'm an Espresso or Cafe Crema type. 
      I am anticipating a bit of a learning curve as I aquaint myself to =
both roasting in general and the RK setup specifically.
      I am looking for suggestions on how best to start. Is there a =
particular bean that is best to cut my teeth on? A bean that will react =
favorably to multiple roast styles while I am dialing in the process. =
Or, should I take the sampler approach with several different beans?
      Looking for wisdom from the sages that have already blazed this =
trail!
      Craig

20) From: Michael Dhabolt
Pat,
On 1/28/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
<Snip>
I'll sincerely support that,  Hip - Hip - ........
Mike (just plain)

21) From: Coffeenut
Here, here on kudos to Ron and his drums, he's a "class act" and the reason
I got into drum roasting on the grill.  I don't have the RK drum, but have
read countless testimonials of praise about it and Ron's support.
On the starter beans, there's several ways you could go with all the choices
on Tom's list.  I'd recommend going with a bean that has good loud snaps
(since you are learning) and a fairly wide roast range like a Sulawesi
Toraja.  Sulawesi is also excellent in espresso.  I started (7yrs ago) with
an electric drum roaster and pretty well burned my first roast (Brazil
Cerrado).  I did the sampler approach with my first order from Sweet Marias
because I didn't know what to order (other than knowing I had to get some
Sulawesi).  The neat thing about drum roasting is that you can do smaller
sizes too and don't have to sacrifice a lot of coffee while you are
learning.  Then when you have your "coffee legs", you can easily move to
larger quantities.
Have fun,
Rick
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Craig Groendyk
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2007 5:05 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +RK Drums
Pat,
 
You may be just the person I need advice from.  I am about to order an RK
Drum and join the ranks of homeroasters. To date I've been purchasing fresh
roasted coffee from Cafe Fresco over the net or Bongo Java in Nashville. I
have a Silvia / Rocky setup (PID from Jim Gallt added). I'm an Espresso or
Cafe Crema type. 
I am anticipating a bit of a learning curve as I aquaint myself to both
roasting in general and the RK setup specifically.
I am looking for suggestions on how best to start. Is there a particular
bean that is best to cut my teeth on? A bean that will react favorably to
multiple roast styles while I am dialing in the process. Or, should I take
the sampler approach with several different beans?
Looking for wisdom from the sages that have already blazed this trail!
Craig

22) From: Craig Groendyk
Rick,
Sounds like a plan!
Thanks for the feedback.
Craig

23) From: raymanowen
"Is there a particular bean that is best to cut my teeth on?"
Yes. That would be a Coffee bean from Sweet Maria's, Craig.
They supply green, mostly, and beans roasted by the Cupper himself, Tom.
That would be the Epitome of flavor for roasted coffee beans. You'll really
enjoy roasting and pulling espresso shots, but if you want the Gold Standard
of roasting excellence for a particular bean, it can be had.
One of these days I, too, look forward to a real espresso machine. The
simulator I have is like practicing on a John Deere to run a Cat D9.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
*Disclaimer:* *These statements have not been evaluated by the SCAA. This
advice is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or ameliorate any coffee
condition.***

24) From: Pat Murray
Craig,
I'm too "green" to give much advice. I would go with Craig's advice.  So far
I am brewing with a TV and an Aeropress. Beans with a good loud 1st crack is
an excellent suggestion.  I also had my best early drum roasts using a bean
that was forgiving if it went 30 seconds, or more into 2nd.  I highly
recommend the Moka Kadir from Sweet Maria's.  I have read where other list
members who drink espresso use it sometimes. The only reawback to it is that
since it is a blend of beans, it has a more drawn out 1st and 2nd crack, so
the beginning and ends of the crack stages are not quite as distinct as a
single origion bean.
Also, you can't go wrong with RayO's advice.  Tom at Sweet Maria's has gone
well beyond excellence in cupping and selecting only the very best most
unique beans from around the world to help this coffee community thrive.
On 1/28/07, Craig Groendyk  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Pat Murray
OOPs, That was Rick's advice. Sorry...
On 1/28/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Craig Groendyk
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Knew what you mean't the first time.  Thanks for your thoughts.  I'm =
anxious to get going with the purchase and installation and join the =
rest of the hands-on community.
Regards,
Craig

27) From: Justin Schwarz
--Apple-Mail-1-694894105
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get at least 10lbs. of something that you know you like and get to  
know that bean well.  I have bought 5lb.-ers of some really great  
coffees and each roast brought me closer to the coffee's "sweet spot"  
unfortunately it was on the last lb. of green stripe and on the last  
lb. of brazil YB out of 5lb.-ers.  your batches will be bigger and  
your stash will grow accordingly.  make sure it's a good cracker too,  
peaberrys usually have quiet first cracks.
Have fun, now you're cooking with gas!
Justin Schwarz
houstini
If there is anything worth doing, it's worth doing right.
--Apple-Mail-1-694894105
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
get at least 10lbs. of something =
that you know you like and get to know that bean well. I have bought =
5lb.-ers of some really great coffees and each roast brought me closer =
to the coffee's "sweet spot" unfortunately it was on the last lb. of =
green stripe and on the last lb. of brazil YB out of 5lb.-ers. your =
batches will be bigger and your stash will grow accordingly. make =
sure it's a good cracker too, peaberrys usually have quiet first =
cracks.
Have = fun, now you're cooking with gas!

Justin = Schwarzhoustini
If there is anything worth = doing, it's worth doing right.

= --Apple-Mail-1-694894105--


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