HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Grinder (95 msgs / 2538 lines)
1) From: Chris Smith
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
Can I have someones take on the Bodum 
Antigua Grin...?
 
Thanks in advance.
 
    - Chris 
Smith

2) From: EuropaChris
Hi, Chris.
I just bought one of these for use at the office.  Not a bad grinder, but compared to the Solis 166/Starbucks Barista, it sucks.  It has the same burr set as the Solis grinders, but the overall design, fit and finish is not nearly as good.  
Also, out of the box, it's pretty well useless for filter drip or espresso.  On the drip setting, I was getting small pebbles, and on the French press setting, pretty much the whole unground bean came out.  So, I had to disassemble it (very easy) and modify the grind range about 3 or 4 clicks.  Now it's fine for drip, but still would never pass for espresso.  My Solis 166 grinds much finer.
Otherwise, after modifying it, it's a good deal for $60 or $70.  Little static and large hopper capacities.
Chris
homeroast wrote:
<Snip>
Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Webmail account today athttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://webmail.netscape.com/homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: steve-spam-homeroast
-=> On Tue, 19 Jun 2001 01:27:13 -0700, "Chris Smith"  said:
<Snip>
I bought one from Costco's on-line store a while back.  It's not as
good as I was expecting.  The burrs are fine, great actually, but the
assembly that holds the ring is no so great.. there's lots of slop.
As I received the grinder, it was *far* to coarse to be useful for
espresso.  I did the usual Internet modifications to make it finer,
and it was still not good.  So I went wild, and hogged out a bunch of
plastic at the 'end stop' until I could turn it a good ten or twelve
(!) clicks past the finest setting.  Now I get fine grind, but the
burrs sometimes rub a little bit.  And the hopper will lift right off
at this setting, which isn't good.  (It's well over 180-degrees from
the coarse side hopper removal setting.)
I think the ring that holds the outer burr allows too much play, so
they touch sooner than it really should.
But while I'm saving for that Rocky or MDF dream-grinder, the Antigua
is turning out a repeatable fine grind that's actually working okay.
I wouldn't let any kids near this potential finger-biter, though.
Seems to be luck of the draw with these.  Decent design with sloppy
tolerances, maybe.
-Steve
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Sharon Allsup
On 19 Jun 2001, at 1:27, Chris Smith wrote:
<Snip>
We've got one purchased on Costco's website (because our local 
stores don't carry them).  It's working fine without modifications.  I 
don't think the spouse has tried it with espresso yet, but the built-in 
settings are producing decent grinds for each of the vacuum, press 
and drip.
I haven't tried one of the more expensive grinders, so can't make 
comparisons.  Since it's working fine, we'll probably not bother with 
looking further until it needs replacement.
<Snip>
Sharon Allsup
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

5) From: Seth Goodman
At 10:48 AM 4/5/02 -0800, Bloch Studio wrote:
<Snip>
Sure it's okay to send a message this way - in fact, it's encouraged. ;-)
Congratulations on undertaking roasting your own coffee.  I've found it's 
more than a hobby - it's a requirement of life. ;-)
Why don't you tell us how you typically brew your coffee, as this will give 
us an idea of what type of grinder you need.
In the absence of other information,  though, I'd recommend you buy a Solis 
Maestro from Tom. See it at 
Good luck in your roasting!
Seth Goodman
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Mike McGinness
I highly suggest the Solis Maestro. I find it a great grinder for any form
of brewing. Espresso, Cafe' Crema, Vac, French Press, Drip... It's my fourth
grinder in a couple years, had it since Christmas '01. Entirely happy with
it. Don't skimp and try cheapo burr grinders like I did, gave a Braun and
Capresso away... sold the retired Solis Mulino on eBay. (Maestro far
superior the Mulino.) Grind really does make a difference, huge difference.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA

7) From: Jim Friedlander
Susan,
  First, congrats on the Fresh Roast Plus purchase.  I find it to be a
fantastic roaster that produces very flavorful roasts.
  As for grinder, it really depends on what you are using it for.  If
you change grinds frequently (i.e. you prepare espresso, Turkish, press
pot, drip all on the same day) you want to get a grinder that you can
change easily.  Tom sells the reasonably priced Solis Maestro grinder
(one of two grinders I own) that fits this task perfectly.  If, however,
you only make espresso, you might want to consider a grinder that has a
finer adjustment than the Maestro, such as the Rancilio Rocky or the
Mazzer Mini.
  The grinder is a key part of the equation in making good coffee....
jim

8) From: Bloch Studio
Hi,
I hope it's ok to send a message this way. I subscribe by the digest method
and have enjoyed reading all of your posts. I just ordered a fresh roast
plus roaster. I've been wanting to roast my own coffee for a year. I'd like
to know what you recommend for grinding beans.
thanks
Susan
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

9) From: Brian Ray
i will also add my congrats on taking the plunge into homeroasting. i took 
the step a little over a year ago and have been enjoying it ever since.  
even if you have consistent access to fresh roasted coffee from a supplier 
(i was spoiled by access to tom's roasts) there is nothing quite as much fun 
as having control over which coffee to roast and how to roast it.
as far as grinders, i would echo the other comments that it very much 
depends on how you brew, particularly if you want to use it for espresso.  
that said, if you use a drip pot or vacuum (which you should investigate if 
you don't), my experience is that an inexpensive burr grinder will serve 
just fine.  i use 5 yr old braun with a partially broken top at work to brew 
in a bodum santos and it works great.  i think they run around $ 30 or $ 40 
although i haven't checked recently.
good luck!
brian
(worried about the survival prospects for the daffodils in columbus)
From: "Bloch Studio" 
Reply-To: homeroast
To: 
Subject: +grinder
Date: Fri, 5 Apr 2002 10:48:42 -0800
Hi,
I hope it's ok to send a message this way. I subscribe by the digest method
and have enjoyed reading all of your posts. I just ordered a fresh roast
plus roaster. I've been wanting to roast my own coffee for a year. I'd like
to know what you recommend for grinding beans.
thanks
Susan
homeroast mailing listhttp://messenger.msn.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastChat with friends online, try MSN Messenger:http://messenger.msn.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: Steve Shank
Like everyone else just about, the solis maestro is a wonderful grinder.=
 some people might have a hard time paying 129 plus shipping for it though.=
 It is worth it if you are the right person for it. However, if you are=
 just getting started you might not want to spend so much. In that case the=
 basic rule is:
Burr grinder not blade grinder.
If you require only 1 or 2 cups at a time a couple times a day, a hand=
 grinder might work for you. Tom has a great collection, buy one of his. 
If you require more coffee and feel 135 or so is too much to spend on a=
 grinder at this time, and are not doing espresso, then a cheaper burr=
 grinder might be the place to start. Someone makes one that is pretty=
 decent and lots of people put their name on it. Hearthware and Braun are=
 two names that are sometimes on it. You can probably pick one up at bed=
 bath and beyond. Do not expect it to be as good as the solis or the good=
 hand grinders, do not expect it to last forever. Expect some mess and lots=
 of static, but it'll be lots better than a blade grinder and lots easier=
 than a hand grinder, and you'll be able to make good coffee.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 04/05/2002 at 10:48 AM Bloch Studio wrote:
<Snip>
 method
<Snip>
 like
<Snip>
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

11) From: R.N.Kyle
Lowell if you want a grinder that will last a very long time, and =
produce grinds suitable for a wide range of brews, including espresso. =
In the 2-3 hundred dollars range I'd go for the Rocky, and 3 to 4 =
hundred the Mizer Mini.
The Zassenhaus Hand Crank Mill produces a really nice grind for under 1 =
hundred dollars. 
Ron Kyle
Anderson SC
rnkyle

12) From: Lowell Nygaard
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Could any of you suggest a good bean grinder.  I'm very new into =
roasting and have been using an inexpensive grinder for some time.  =
Thanks for any help.     Lowell

13) From: jim gundlach
There seems to be two major choices.  The Mazzer Mini which costs about =
$400.  Although there is a place you can get it for $275 if you pay 
$1,100 or 1,200 for an espresso machine at the same time.  The other 
choice is the Rocky for about $220.  I would recommend the doserless 
version of the Rocky.  Home users rarely use a grinder enough to need a =
doser and as a result it tends to collect ground coffee and let it set =
between grinding and brewing.  The Mazzer has infinite adjustment which =
some people with lever machines say they need.
    Jim Gundlach
On Monday, February 17, 2003, at 05:44 PM, Lowell Nygaard wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Rich Adams
Hey Lowell...
Depending on how much you have to brew, I found any of the Zass modelshttp://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlto have dramatically improved my
coffee experience, well, next to home roasting that is.
I count a hundred turns or so for 22 grams set 1/2 turn back from the finest
setting.
Rich Adams

15) From: Robert Foster
<Snip>
If you're not into espresso, and were looking to spend a little less 
than the ones that have been recommended, the  Solis Maestro is 
capable of producing acceptable results for drip, press, vac pot, 
etc.  They're @ $129. Tom sells them: http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.solis-espresso.shtml#maestroupdatergf
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

16) From: Ben Treichel
Robert Foster wrote:
<Snip>
FYI, that means don't use for espresso since the track record seems like 
they wear out in about a year of you do. I used a zass for all of my 
grinding before I got my rocky.
Ben
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Lowell Nygaard" 
<Snip>
and have been using an inexpensive grinder for some time.  Thanks for any
help.     Lowell
I decided to add my buck two ninety-eight after all. I'm part of the buy
better and save money in the long run camp. A little over two years ago I
thought to upgrade my decade old Braun burr grinder. Didn't bother to get
input, and bought a Capresso 551 thinking it cost twice as much so must be
better. WRONG, used it for two days went back to the Braun. Then ordered the
Solis Mulino 177. Not bad with mediocre adjustabiltiy and lots of chute hang
and static cling. (I wasn't into real espresso yet, just had a steam toy)
Less than a year later *upgraded* to the Solis Maestro. Better
adjustability, less chute hang and static. Two months later got Miss Silvia
and discovered the Maestro worked *ok* for espresso. But not for long. Burrs
wore out in just a few months do to burr slop & rub. Almost exactly a year
after getting the Maestro got a Rocky. Two year and four grinder purchases
totalling over $500. Gave the Capresso away to the local fire department
with a couple pounds homeroast, sold the Mulino on ebay for $60, gave the
wore out Maestro away with all kinds of disclaimers (though Scott says it
works better than his whirley chop even with worn out burrs). So my Rocky
cost me about $440 by not buying it first.
Either buy a Rocky or better now, forget the Maestro IMNSHO, keep using your
old grinder 'till you can afford it. At the minimum get a Zass hand grinder
for now and save for a Rocky or better. Cheaper electric burr grinders will
only waste money.
MM;-) aka Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
FrankenRoast Dual Variable Transformer Rosto Roasting
Rocky grindin' - Miss Silvia brewin'
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: floyd burton
This grinder experience is something I have done in the past with other
products-it is why I hate buying without knowing something about the
product-you buy your way up to the product that works and spend 2x in the
process-been there and get a bad feeling when doing that.

19) From: Acorn54
i'd go with a zassenhaus unless you have a bigger budget and are using the 
grinder for espresso
a short story of my search for a suitable grinder. at first i got a 
hearthware grinder that came with the old special of the gourmet roaster and 
grinder for 60 bucks.
then i was sold on the solis mulino which gave a good grind only problem was 
the burrs wore out in 7  months. now i'm using a model 156 zassenhaus knee 
model. grinds in two minutes for a 4 cup pot of coffee. i use a kitchenaid 
ultra compact. i was sold on it by kevin sinnott's write up in his coffee 
book.
anyway the zassenhaus has a 10 year warranty so i think i'll have use of it 
for some time. end of journey for a grinder-guy from long island
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

20) From: Gregg Talton
Today while visiting my parents I walked to the attic and discovered a
Zass. It works perfectly and there is an unbelievable difference in my
coffee.  I'm drinking a Kona Americana right now that's the best I've
ever had.  I had been using a cheap (Target) burr grinder.  The Zass is
a lot of work but the results are worth it. WOW.
Gregg

21) From: Barry Luterman
Great find. I love mine. Don't even desire an electric now. Somehow the act
of grounding the coffee myself keeps me more in the process of making the
perfect cup. I guess it's more of a Zen thing as my brother would say.

22) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Gregg,
     Great find.   I hope you chime in supporting me the next time I get 
yelled at for trying to tell people that the only decent grinder I know 
of for less than a few hundred dollars is the Zass.
       Jim Gundlach
On Aug 29, 2004, at 7:15 PM, Gregg Talton wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: gin
Lucky you Gregg:
It is work but heck, ya gotta great cup after.
ginny

24) From: Lesley Albjerg
Many of us have been preaching this message for a long time!  The grind is the critical step after the roast and rest to achieve an excellent cup of coffee.
 
Les
Gregg Talton  wrote:
Today while visiting my parents I walked to the attic and discovered a
Zass. It works perfectly and there is an unbelievable difference in my
coffee. I'm drinking a Kona Americana right now that's the best I've
ever had. I had been using a cheap (Target) burr grinder. The Zass is
a lot of work but the results are worth it. WOW.
Gregg

25) From: Gregg Talton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've read post after post about the importance of a grinder but never
acted.  After watching my LaPavoni produce an abundance of beautiful,
golden creama I'm in awe. There was no bitterness!!!  After 8 months of
roasting a lot has changed.  I drink espresso and press coffee daily and
my Bunn has dust on it.  I've modded my poppers (split wired and
bypassed the thermostat). now I'm eyeing pump machines.  It's a slippery
slope. Perhaps coffee roasting is my convertible as I have a mid life
crisis. hummm..
 
Gregg

26) From: Johnny Kent
At 07:15 PM 8/29/2004 -0500, you wrote:
<Snip>
Yeah, it's hard to describe the difference but you can taste it. The zass
brought about *the* single most improvement in our coffee. as you said wow.

27) From: Dennis Parham
--Apple-Mail-2--381407675
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetNDOWS-1252;
	format=flowed
hehhe..well..Gregg...in that case.. a nice LaMarzzoco would fit the 
bill...bout same price as a preowned convert...lol
well.. not a ferrari one...lol
Dennis Parham
On Aug 29, 2004, at 9:34 PM, Gregg Talton wrote:
<Snip>
never 
<Snip>
beautiful, 
<Snip>
months 
<Snip>
wired 
<Snip>
Itís a 
<Snip>
a 
<Snip>
my
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-2--381407675
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetNDOWS-1252
hehhe..well..Gregg...in that case.. a nice LaMarzzoco would fit the
bill...bout same price as a preowned convert...lol
well.. not a ferrari one...lol
Dennis Parham 
On Aug 29, 2004, at 9:34 PM, Gregg Talton wrote:
=
Arial0000,0000,8080Iíve
read post after post about the importance of a grinder but never
acted.† After watching my LaPavoni produce an abundance of beautiful,
golden creama Iím in awe. There was no bitterness!!! †After 8 months
of roasting a lot has changed.† I drink espresso and press coffee
daily and my Bunn has dust on it.† Iíve modded my poppers (split =
wired
and bypassed the thermostat)Ö now Iím eyeing pump machines.† Itís =
a
slippery slopeÖ Perhaps coffee roasting is my convertible as I have a
mid life crisisÖ hummm..
=
Arial0000,0000,8080†
=
Arial0000,0000,8080Gregg
=
Arial0000,0000,8080 †

28) From: Norm Hardy
People here, with passion, talk about the Rocky and the Mazzer and the Solis 
Maestro grinders.  My next grinder might be one of the pricey ones.
But I'm sure happy with the $99 Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder. 
With the grinder set to the 5th finest grind, it makes a killer
espresso in my cheapie Krups espresso machine.  The improvement over the 
blade grinder was instantly noticeable.  The blade grinder made the beans 
smell wonderful while they were being pulverized.  The burr grinder keeps 
the aroma in the beans to come out in the drink.
I just need some good recommendations for an espresso machine, in the price 
range up to, say, about $500.  Any suggestions?
Thanks.

29) From: miKe mcKoffee
For your given price range, in no particular order I'd suggest taking a
strong look at:
1) Rancilio Silvia
2) Miss Silvia by Rancilio
3) Rancilio Miss Silvia
4) Silvia by Ranciliohttp://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.rancilio.shtmlor if you don't like Missy's classic clean lines
5) Gaggia Classichttp://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.gaggia.shtmlKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

30) From: Gary Townsend
miKe, great answer, but I think that your choice adds up to almost $2K
! I'm saving my pennies to buy one by Christmas # 2, & I think Tom is
running a special throws in some roast & greens...you know where mine
will be purchased. Unless I can get 1 in a thrift store for under
$50., that is ;-) , some things are best, new.! BTW, miKe, if your
ever in KS on I-70, I'd be happy to hand you the keys to my grill & my
roaster's, anytime!
On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 10:36:32 -0800, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
price
<Snip>
Norm a $99 conical, compared to a 30 dollar flat burr is a nice step up. The
Gusto is good little single boiler pump espresso machine.
I have had a couple, and a Silvia, I now have a HX machine (Expobar Office
Pulsar) nice machine and its a work horse if you have company over. The
ability to pull shot after shot and maintain temp is nice, lots of steam for
caps and you can do both at the same time if you like.
It is just above your target by 200 and if on sale 100.
For under or right at 500 the rancilio silvia is a nice machine. good luck
in your quest.
RK

32) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
My MDF arrived today and since my new Sylvia won't arrive 'til next =
week, I used it grind for a brew in my old steam toy.  I made caps for =
my wife and I and though not great, there was a definite improvement =
over the steam toy and cheap grinder combo.  I actually got some decent =
crema, which never happened before.  I also got a clean dry puck instead =
of sludge.  Now I really can't wait until I get my real machine.  
Another Mike

33) From:
Keep tinkering, Mike- you can vary the grind now, and affect the resistance
of the puck to flow; therefore, the brew time and ultimate pressure of the
steam; and therefore the temperature of the brew.
I actually played with some slight rudimentary packing, although they say
"do it Not", and the stuff I got out of it tasted better with a little
crema.
Cheers, Your day is coming- RayO, aka Opa!
--
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Wichita WurliTzer

34) From: anthony mullendore
what is the best grinder for a limited budget

35) From: Brett Mason
Zassenhaus - it's manual, great, and you buy them used on eBay
Brett
  Zassman
On 12/22/06, anthony mullendore  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

36) From: raymanowen
Then, again, if your budget really does control and the Chancellor of the
Exchequer has been narrow minded, the Thrift Store often has treasure. You
could find a serviceable Mortar and Pestle. Keep looking! The Mortar and
Pestle can do a nice job, but it's hard to control and it's an awful lot of
work for any more than a single liter of coffee.
For a few bucks, you might even find a burr grinder. It'll probably need
parts, like New Burrs. There goes the budget already, and you just started
spending. A blade mill really can do a very decent job of grinding if you
sharpen the blade and learn how to use it.
For the thousand nay sayers, they define themselves as not having a set of
files to sharpen the blade. They have never done it. The lawn mower doesn't
work too well with a dull blade either. Same solution.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Illegitimus non Carborundum-

37) From: an iconoclast
On 12/21/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
With a word of caution... If you have tendonitis is your shoulders,
wrists or elbows AND grind more than one pot a day or do not have
children you can order to "Grind this for me, please", then an
electric grinder may be better for you.  Just my experience.
Take care,
Ann

38) From: b cook
What's the budget and what methods of brewing will you be doing?  Which
methods with you use most and least?
bc
On 12/22/06, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>

39) From: Bernard Gerrard
Perhaps I missed it but I have not seen and comments on the Cuisinart 
grinder.  I have one and thought it would be an upgrade.  It seems to 
make more powder than I like to have.  Comments?  There is an old meat 
grinder type mill in the basement that was a "decorative" item given by 
a friend.  Worth the trouble?  I'll report.
Good that the mention of sauerkraut stuck a cord.  Probably one has to 
be "older" to appreciate it.  Squeezing and rinsing  will even redeem 
the grocery store stuff.  Middle European recipes will state this 
procedure.   Bernard

40) From: Leo Zick
I have a kitchen aid and sausage grinder attachment. Theres no way it would
work for coffee.

41) From: Lynne
I don't know if it's the same model, but I got the one the Costco 
sells, (love that return policy!) and brought it back. This was way 
back, when I first started roasting, early last year. Hated it. Coffee 
just didn't taste right (but I was a newbie, then) and cleaning it 
seemed impossible.
Lynne
On Jan 15, 2007, at 4:12 AM, Bernard Gerrard wrote:
<Snip>

42) From: Leo Zick
Youre right it exists, but since its advertised as a grain mill, im guessing
itll only work for press pot at best :ohttp://www.kitchenaid.com/catalog/product.jsp?src=Stand+Mixer+Accessories&cat8&prodg3

43) From: Julie Tieszen
Yes, for wheat, but I don't think it would work for coffee.
Julie
=
----- Original Message ----
From: "True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)" 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, Jan=
uary 15, 2007 12:29:45 PM
Subject: +RE: grinder
Now here is a questi=
on speaking of grinders...
Has anybody ever used a kitchen-aide with a=
 grinder attachment?
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
Safety=
 Dept
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB an=
d Z&D roasting in the southern hemisphere
 "On station and on point 109 a=
nd counting down..." 
Perhaps I missed it but I have not seen an=
d comments on the Cuisinart 
grinder.  I have one and thought it would be=
 an upgrade.  It seems to 
make more powder than I like to have.  Comment=
s?  There is an old meat 
grinder type mill in the basement that was a "d=
ecorative" item given by 
a friend.  Worth the trouble?  I'll report.
=
Good that the mention of sauerkraut stuck a cord.  Probably one has to =
be "older" to appreciate it.  Squeezing and rinsing  will even redeem =
the grocery store stuff.  Middle European recipes will state this 
pro=
cedure.   Bernard
ho=
meroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homero=ast
To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
u=
nsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsetti=ngs
homeroast mailing l=
isthttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change y=
our personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

44) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Now here is a question speaking of grinders...
Has anybody ever used a kitchen-aide with a grinder attachment?
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
Safety Dept
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the southern hemisphere
 "On station and on point 109 and counting down..." 
Perhaps I missed it but I have not seen and comments on the Cuisinart 
grinder.  I have one and thought it would be an upgrade.  It seems to 
make more powder than I like to have.  Comments?  There is an old meat 
grinder type mill in the basement that was a "decorative" item given by 
a friend.  Worth the trouble?  I'll report.
Good that the mention of sauerkraut stuck a cord.  Probably one has to 
be "older" to appreciate it.  Squeezing and rinsing  will even redeem 
the grocery store stuff.  Middle European recipes will state this 
procedure.   Bernard

45) From: Brian Kamnetz
The Zassenhaus grain mill reportedly works very well for espresso.
Brian
On 1/15/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

46) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
I have seen a coffee/nut grinding attachment at Bed bath and Beyond
This was about 2 years ago or so... Not sure if they still have it.
I have a kitchen aid and sausage grinder attachment. Theres no way it
would work for coffee.

47) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Gotcha! Thanks.. No web access to check my fading memory.... 
Youre right it exists, but since its advertised as a grain mill, im
guessing itll only work for press pot at best :ohttp://www.kitchenaid.com/catalog/product.jsp?src=Stand+Mixer+Accessori=e
s&ca
t=158&prod=673

48) From: Chris Jones
Hello all,
I just lost my grinder last night.  Not sure what happened, but a bean
(which I roasted only an hour before) actually jammed and then
de-threaded my rather inexpensive Cuisinart.  As in - crunch, ugh,
dead stop.
Would someone recommend a grinder to replace it with?  Buying online
is easier - so links to the actual product would be appreciated!
Cost?  I don't know...maybe $100ish?  While you are at it - feel free
to recommend a good drip coffee maker!
Would you mind responding to my email, as I have a hard time finding
time to read the whole list. Although it's great conversation!
All the best,
Chris
ctjones
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

49) From: Brett Mason
Chris,
GRINDER:
If you liked the Cuisinart, another one is already in your price range.
If you are doing drip only, the Solis Maestro will get you there, although
you'll get fines in the grind, which means some bitter notes....
BUT I have to mention the Zassenhaus Knee ill as found on Sweet Maria's
site.  It's the bets value out there in new wills,and the product is
incredibly good...l  Everything is downhill until you get to the
semi-commercial conical burr mills and above (Rocky and friends, $300+)
DRIP BREWER:
Tougher choice.  You want brew temp first - but there are none out there in
the cheap but good-temp range.
Technivorm off Sweet Maria's again, but it's pricey.
I love an electric cordless kettle, and a French Press (large size).
I use that, and a Melitta CLarity, with amazing temp and a $19.99 purchase
price - they can't be found anymore.  In my basement is a new in box Presto
Scandnavian for the same reason - once Clarity dies and I cannot fix it....
But no other cheapies out there are worth their salt.
Have a nice French Press, and call me in the morning...
Brett
On 3/7/08, Chris Jones  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comHomeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

50) From: David Daeschler
Hi Chris,
<Snip>
I've had really good luck with a Breville BCG450XL Ikon Conical Burr
Grinder for drip and French Press.  I know it's not high end equipment,
but it hasn't failed on me and seems to produce very even grinds.http://www.amazon.com/Breville-BCG450XL-Ikon-Conical-Grinder/dp/B000MDHH0Q<Snip>
I use a Bunn home brewer for drip at home because I had a hard time
finding a coffee maker locally that didn't produce a bitter cup.  By
reading and investigation I found that in most cheap coffee makers the
water starts out cool and finally reaches acceptable temperatures
towards the end of the brew cycle.  The Bunn stores pre-heated water
inside of it's reservoir ready for use when you start the brew.  This
way water is at brewing temperature all the way through the cycle.
Below is a link to the hot plate model.  I don't leave the carafe on the
plate after brewing is finished, so the hot plate isn't a problem for
me.http://www.amazon.com/BTX-B-ThermoFresh-10-Cup-Thermal-Carafe-Coffee/dp/B000FFRYYK/ref=sr_1_2?ieF8&s=home-garden&qid04923324&sr=1-2Hope this helps,">http://www.amazon.com/GRX-B-Original-10-Cup-Coffee-Brewer/dp/B000FFRZ26/ref=sr_1_3?ieF8&s=home-garden&qid04923324&sr=1-3they also have a thermal carafe modelhttp://www.amazon.com/BTX-B-ThermoFresh-10-Cup-Thermal-Carafe-Coffee/dp/B000FFRYYK/ref=sr_1_2?ieF8&s=home-garden&qid04923324&sr=1-2Hope this helps,
- Dave
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

51) From: Brett Mason
Chris,
Aaron describes here a simple process to remake any cheap coffeemaker into a
hi-temp great brewer.  This is my plan to tinker and solve this summer -
it's a 30-60 minute project, for about $25.  The solution is identical to
how it is done with the Clarity I use daily...  Read up and this will do you
very well...
Brett
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Aaron Scholten 
Date: Oct 30, 2007 6:01 PM
Subject: Re: +Brewers
To: homeroast
Well sarcasm is part of the bonus plan,... deal with it..... you come
out of nowhere with a smart comment and  attitude like that and you
think nobody is going to not respond in kind... you should know better.
Now onto your coffee pot..... Is it worth it to you?    Were you happy
with the coffee you got from your kweezynart?  If so, then you probably
can do just as well with a bunn, or mr coffee, or what ever the other
brands are that run maybe 30 to 40 bucks each.  I had a Mr coffee that
while the thing was terribly slow to brew, lasted years and years and
went on more than one med cruise with me where it made probably close to
ten pots a day.  To be honest the thing is about ten years old now, it
still runs, but is sitting in a closet, since I took up this
methodology, I really no longer use it.
The main thing I see about the techy is that it puts out the water at
the proper temp.  ie 195 - 205  plus or minus a few degrees.  This is
what most claim is the most important thing about drip brewing....  Now
with that, depending on how adept you are at tinkering, I have mod'ed
many coffee pots to put out the hot water at the right temp as well....
See they all have a little thingie in the bottom that basically boils a
bit of water, it steams and the steam pushes the rest of the near
boiling water, up the tube and out the spout into the grounds.  this
causes a check valve thingie to go gurgle klunk and let more water in to
heat up, partially boil and spurt out as well....  The big problem is
that the tube that brings the water from the boiler chamber (very loose
term there) to the squirt hole thingie going into your coffee ground
group, ... runs through the entire resevoir of water which cools it down
greatly.... some pots as low as mid 150's to low 160's...... not the
best temp to brew at.  If you goto any home store, ie lowes, home depot
ace whatever... get some plastic tubing.. the flexible clear stuff
works.  and you can probably take the arm / angle thing off the top of
the coffee pot w/o busting it, and that leaves the tube that carries the
water up exposed.   Take this slightly larger flex tubing you bought
(cut to size) and put a blob of silicone sealant on the bottom of it,
and shove it over the top of the existing tube, and all the way to the
bottom of the pot and glue it firmly in place... you want to make sure
it's sealed tight on the bottom, you don't want the water to run up
it..... what this does is basically give an air gap between the water
tube from the boiler, and the water outside it... the air won't conduct
heat nearly as fast as water will so the overall temp of the water
hitting your grounds is much higher now....after all it was just
boiling, the steam is what pushes it out......
oh, yah... put the thing back together, let it dry so the glue is
cured.... generally 24 hours... and give it a shot...
Or... again if you tinker,  the heating element in a pot, they all
pretty much are the same thing, the wattage may vary slightly but you
seen one you pretty much seen them all.... they cost a few bucks,
replace it...either get one new from an appliance shop or goto a thrift
shop get a cheap ass pot, take the heater out of that one and put it in
yours......
or just get the technivorn and know it's a good pot at the right temp,
though quite expensive....
several choices to choose from depending on how adventurous you feel.
Aaron....
John B. Webster wrote:
<Snip>-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comHomeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

52) From: Gary Foster
If you want just a single cup brewer, from what I understand the 
Cuisinart-SS1 is supposed to be the bees knees.  Works with fresh ground 
or you can even use it with pods if you're so inclined.  I haven't tried 
it myself but I've seen it spoken very highly of.
-- Gary F.
David Daeschler wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

53) From: Seth Grandeau
I've had really good luck with my Capresso coffee maker.  It hits 200
degrees very consistently.  They tend to be pricy, but Amazon is clearing
out some of the thermal models for $50.  The reviews have some negatives,
but it may be worth trying.
Here's the link:http://www.amazon.com/Capresso-490-05-Stainless-Thermal-Coffeemaker/dp/B000ELBRGG/ref=cm_lmf_tit_sub_1On 3/7/08, Gary Foster  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

54) From: Coffee
I've got a Cuisinart SS1 and I love it. I'm the only one in the house  
who drinks coffee and being able to make one at a time is great. It's  
noisy and slow, but makes a great cup of coffee. I've not measured the  
temperature (project for the weekend :-) but it seems quite hot.
-Peter
On Mar 7, 2008, at 1:17 PM, Gary Foster wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

55) From: Paul Helbert
If you are only going to be doing drip, the Bodum C-mill that SM has for
about $20.00 is much better than the competition among whirling blade mills.
It can even grind uniformly enough for Cona and Cory vacuum pots with no
stalling.
For price and control you can't beat a pour over filter cone. SM has 'em as
does your local Do It Best Hardware.
-- 
Paul Helbert
We have enough youth.
How about a fountain of smart?
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

56) From: Les
Chris,
I would buy the new Cimbali Max Hybrid from Chis Coffee.  Cost is $795.00.
Since Tom sells grinders I won't add a link.  I would then buy a Tecnivorm
from Tom.  They are built to last.  The Grinder is the most important link
in the brew process.  My personal grinder is a Mazzer Major, cost for a new
one is $995.00.  I have used a Macap Conical Espresso Grinder with Stepless
Adjustment for two weeks and was amazed at how it brought out the layers of
complex flavors in the coffees  price is now $995.00 too.  For the ultimate
grinder,  a Mazzer Robar would be the way to go, sweet 71mm conical burrs
powered by 900 watt motor for the ultimate grind!  It will cost you only $2,
229.18.  So you can see that the Cimbali Max Hybrid with its combination of
conical and flat burrs at $795.00 is a pretty good deal.  If I was looking
for a new grinder, this is the one I would buy.  Oh I forgot, the utlimate
grinder would be the Mazzer Zar, 120mm / 140mm titanium coated burrs,  It
will grind 6 pounds in a minute!  The burrs are rated at 50,000 pounds so
they should last you a life time.  Oh the cost, only $4,842.00.
On Fri, Mar 7, 2008 at 7:08 PM, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

57) From: Sandy Andina
Les, I hope your tongue is firmly implanted in cheek--Chris said his  
grinder budget is about $100, and he plans to do drip coffee.
Seriously, we coffee geeks tend to let our enthusiasm and expertise  
run away with us and eagerly tell newbies not only all we know but  
what they should buy, even if they never indicated an inclination to  
immediately dive into the deep end of the connoisseurship pool. More  
often than not, we scare the hell out of them--or worse, give them an  
inferiority complex. Remember, however sophisticated our own setups,  
there is always someone on this list who can top them--whether  
grinder, espresso machine, or roaster.  I realize that it  
theoretically makes sense to buy only the best and not have to  
upgrade; but that's often possible only in retrospect--often, baby  
steps are necessary. Let's not intimidate those who would like to  
share our passion.
Sandy
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 8, 2008, at 2:17 PM, Les wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

58) From: Brett Mason
Sandy, what should he get?
Brett
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 4:04 PM, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comHomeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

59) From: Rich
Good grinder at less than $100.00, not interested in cranking your 
brains out, try a commercial Bunn.
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

60) From: Sandy Andina
I suggested he look first at a Bodum Antigua, which has gotten Mark  
Prince's nod over at CoffeeGeek. Street price of $65-80.  It is a true  
burr grinder with metal cutting burrs (the same set as Solis uses for  
its Maestro) rather than the nylon grinding wheels of the Cuisinart,  
Krups, DeLonghi or Braun cheapies. A Solis Maestro Plus (sorry, Ray,  
but I'm delighted with mine for drip) would be even better if he can  
go $50 over budget, because of its sturdier construction. I did not  
suggest a manual mill, because most people do not want to expend the  
elbow grease it takes when they're half awake in the morning (the  
downside of my Zass Turkish when I'm on the road--it takes too long  
even for a single AP cup and hurts my arms).  I am a firm believer in  
not trying to kill cockroaches with a Howitzer--a Rocky or better is  
overkill for drip, and when (and if) Chris decides to step up to  
espresso, it is a colossal PITA to change grinds that much (not at all  
the same as the constant micro-adjustments necessary for espresso, at  
which Mazzers excel--and at which the Rocky is tricky at any degree of  
change).  When it's time to move up to espresso, then we'll talk $300+  
grinders (although not necessarily $500+ espresso machines to start).
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 8, 2008, at 5:35 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

61) From: Les
Sandy,
I had the tongue firmly planted in the check!  Seriously, I would go for a
Zass if I had to stay under a hundred bucks.  The other thought and the
hidden intent of my first post is how many times do you want to spend a
hundred bucks?  The grinders I mentioned will all last a real long time,
without upgrade fever.  I had a Solis Maestro and it was a good grinder for
drip.  Seriously all electric grinders will have to either be replaced or
have the burrs replaced.  I would look for good used Rocky and replace the
burrs.  Burrs on drip should last at least 300-500 pounds.  You will be
lucky to get a hundred to two hundred from the Bodum or the Maestro.
Les
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 4:00 PM, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

62) From: Sandy Andina
Yeah, but by the time he's had 200 lbs. he's probably ready for  
espresso, but the grinder will still have amortized itself.  You (and  
we all are guilty of this) are making the assumption that if he can  
spend $100 now, and another $100 three or four years down the line (my  
Bodum is six years old, my SM+ four), then he can scrape together  
$300+ right now and avoid upgrading later. But he probably CAN'T-- 
otherwise, why a $100 budget?  The perfect is the enemy of the good. I  
know people who won't fly because they can't afford first class and  
won't go to the theater because all they can afford are nosebleed  
seats....and so they never go anywhere.  Better he should enjoy a good  
grinder now instead of going without coffee (or buying preground)  
because he can't afford a great one. And I'll say it again--I am not  
enamored of a Rocky for drip; if he ever progresses to espresso, he  
will probably need a separate drip grinder anyway because it's been my  
experience that adjusting the Rocky takes three hands or a  
modification of the switch (which reminds me of another rash  
assumption--that anyone willing to roast their own beans is also  
willing and able to take apart an electrical appliance and  
successfully futz with its innards).
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 8, 2008, at 6:39 PM, Les wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

63) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd check Baratza (Maestro/Virtuoso mfg) website for refurbs... 
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

64) From: miKe mcKoffee
I've used a grinds dispenser Rocky (aka doser with forks removed "dispensed
into SS kitchen twine canister) for any and all grinding methods for over 6
years. Easily adjusts between French Press and tight ristretto in seconds
with two not three hands. That is of course because I don't store beans in
the hopper at home, ever, and therefore doesn't need to be turned on the
adjust. But that switch issue is only an issue with the stupid doserless
model anyway which is highly subject to clumping. Grinding into cannister
for shots has the added advantage of quickly shaking it side to side before
dumping into PF. This eliminates any clumping which may have been missed by
the thwacking and have hence never needed such weird time consuming methods
as WDT etc. 
Link to visual of Rocky with SS grinds catcher as been on wwww.mckoffee.com
for years...
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>
 And I'll say it again--I am not  
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

65) From: Jim Anderson
I am about ready to order a Rocky and was going to get the doserless model
until I read this post.
miKe, would you expound a bit on this. I have read that cutting a bit off of
the snout on the doserless one makes it easier to clean and noticed that one
list member mentioned blowing the grinds out after each session with a
modified plunger. Does the doser model keep one from having to go through
all this?  How easy is it to remove the forks?
For the time being this is only going to be used for drip and press pots,
not espresso. I have gone through a couple of sets of burrs on my SMP and it
is starting to stall my filters again. I don't have a problem spending a bit
more money for something that will last a long while. I still have tools I
bought to work on my first car 45 years ago.
Thanks,
Jim
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 5:45 PM, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

66) From: Brett Mason
Rocky forks pull out with no resistance.
I have removed the internal fingerguard and covered the holes with
electrical tape.
I follow same course as MiKe in not keeping beans in the mill - I load and
grind what I need, so I can switch varietals in an instant...
MiKe's other techniques I don't follow, but maybe I should...
Brett
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 8:08 PM, Jim Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comHomeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

67) From: miKe mcKoffee
IMO using a doser aka grinds dispenser Rocky model with canister for other
than espresso is much easier than doserless model too. Put the beans in,
turn on, they go into the snug fitting canister with virtually zero mess,
turn off, remove canister and dump grinds in whatever you're brewing with. I
use the grinding time to re-vac mason jar beans came out of. As I "recall"
from 6+ years ago doser model forks had a couple screw to remove but must
not have been too hard 'cuz I did it:-) No, I can't tell you how in detail
anymore. Grind hang in chute channel is the same regardless the Rocky model.
I use Click-Clack for lid to help blow grinds out plus flux brush. Guarantee
any grinds left would be in tenths of a gram at most.
IMO for non-espresso duties only a Virtuoso or SMP etc. is more
ergonomically friendly and do a right decent job. Yeah, burrs need to be
replaced periodically. So do Rocky's just not as often! I replace 'em about
once a year @ ~75 pounds. That's primarily espresso duties. Strictly coarser
grinding probably could double that.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

68) From: Larry English
re: replacing Rocky burrs - I'm now a non-espresso guy so didn't replace my
Rocky's cutters until just recently, at around 120 lb.  But what a
difference, whether French press, drip, or KMB.  I was getting an uneven
grind and now I get what I dial in to Rocky - and it does make a difference
in the brew.  I recommend miKe's replacement strategy, even for us
non-espresso folks.
Larry
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 7:08 PM, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

69) From: Sandy Andina
Which is the model I have, because I heard the doser is not very good  
and is hard to clean. Once again, I want an appliance I don't have to  
hack into to make it work--I am not mechanically inclined, nor should  
one have to be beyond the skills necessary to operate equipment.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 8, 2008, at 7:45 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

70) From: Larry English
I suspect that miKe's comments are based on 6-yr-old research and memory,
not on his actual use of the wonderful, trouble-free doserless Rocky (my
model, too) ... but I could be wrong ...
Larry
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 7:53 PM, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

71) From: miKe mcKoffee
The "stock" doser sweep on Rocky is about on par with the "stock" doser
sweep of a $900+ Mazzer Major, both crap and both easily remedied with tape
mod. However until getting into a far higher grinder range the doser has a
very valuable use, declumping the grinds. Yes it takes a bit of modding for
a relatively clean doser sweep. But I'll take that over clumping which is a
major cause of channeling and hence poor shots.
What you want and what you get tends to be relative to what you're willing
to pay and or do if not willing to pay.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

72) From: miKe mcKoffee
Nope, not 6 year old information from old research and memory. Been around
various grounders many times many places including hosting many Gatherings
with many guest grinders in attendance. Trouble-free is relative I suppose.
For instance grind hang is much easier to clear with a brush on the doser
versus doserless Rocky. Unless "modding/cutting" the doserless snout. And
clumping is a fact of life with long channel runs. Doserless the clumped
grinds go straight into the PF, doser thwacking breaks them up...
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

73) From: Sandy Andina
Which is why I opted for the latter (SM Plus) for my main non-espresso  
grinder. In fact, it was also my first espresso grinder that worked  
well for that. Later bought the Rocky DL because I got it for only  
$175--the SM+ became my drip/press grinder and the Rocky my espresso  
grinder.  (Already had the Bodum Antigua, which became my go-to for  
decaf or specialty beans--such as a small batch of Panama La Gesha or  
Kona). Eventually got a Mazzer Mini (again, hundreds below list)  
because I wanted stepless adjustment. Moved the Rocky to decaf or  
special-bean espresso duty.That was two years ago.  Now, you may think  
I'm either nuts or profligate for having four grinders, but I have  
lots of counter space and I like to store my batches of beans for  
current use in my main grinders, since I do go through them fairly  
fast.  And the Rocky and Mazzer are very well suited to espresso.    
Point is, had I not gotten deeply into espresso, I probably would have  
stuck with just the Bodum (which does work quite nicely) until it  
broke or dulled--which it shows no signs of doing.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 8, 2008, at 9:08 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

74) From: pecanjim
 Mike,
      Since I've started using the dissection needle  to  stir  the  grinds  in  the portafilter before leveling and tamping, I find that occasionally  a  section  will  collapse  indicating  a  vacant  space  is  being  held  open  by  a  clump.  And that is with a doser.  My conclusion is that a doser breaks down most, but not all clumps.
     pecan jim
  -------------- Original message from "miKe mcKoffee" : --------------
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

75) From: Allon Stern
Rapping the portafilter straight down on the counter doesn't work well  
enough? Interesting...
-
allon
On Mar 9, 2008, at 7:15 AM, pecanjim wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

76) From: Larry English
Yeah, I know, miKe - jest kiddin'.  But clearing the chute with air works
fine and clumping has been a problem only with settings down in espresso
range, which I haven't been using in a while.  I do feel that I'm getting
more uniform grinds, and thus better French press and moka pot brews than
with the Solis Maestro I had previously.  So I'm happy ... to each his/her
own ...
On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 9:33 PM, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

77) From: Chris Jones
Just wanted to thank you all for the solid grinder advice given!  So
many choices..."an embarrassment of riches!"
I will be calling on the experts of this list again (that, I guarantee).
Chris
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

78) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
Jim, IIRC from years gone by roast exchanges you tend to roast relatively
dark. The darker the roast the greater the tendancy to clump fine grinding
for espresso. Also how "vigorous" the thwacking a factor, a big factor. Ya
gotta really "attack" the thwack rapidly for it to be effective! 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

79) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
Downward tapping usually a means of settling grounds for over-dosing. IMO
only somewhat effective for distribution de-clumping.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

80) From: Allon Stern
On Mar 11, 2008, at 10:25 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
Yeah, if I tap then top off, mildly tap, then level, I'm usually  
okay. If I tap tap tap, top off, level, tap tap top off level, tap  
tap, top off, level, then I find for some reason, the extraction  
stalls ;)
I did examine my dosing closely today; I noticed a few small lentil- 
sized clumps.
I tried a broken off plastic fork tine, but it wasn't nearly fine  
enough for WDT. May have to grab a few pins to bring to the office.
I also examined the puck after extraction and noticed a pinhole,  
bubbling out. Mmm hmm.
-
allon
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.com

81) From: Gregg Talton
Lurk mode ... off
I mostly lurk but couldn't resist posting a note about my new coffee
experience.  I've been roasting since 2002 (and on the list for about that
long), starting with a hot air popper and slowly advancing until reaching a
Behmor and Gene Cafe.  I played the same game with grinders.  I started with
a whirley blade and kept inching up until finally watching the Fed-Ex truck
arrive this morning with my new Rocky.  I've been pulling shots ever since.
I've read hundreds of posts about the importance of a good grinder for
espresso and today I understand more than ever.  My old grinder, a Maestro
Plus, was great for drip and press but I can taste and see the difference
the in the shots.  There's now loads of crema and the shot taste
incredible.  I did have to adjust the grind and will experiment with
different grind settings and I'm sure there will be more improvement.  My
LaPavoni is getting a workout today.  Oh, I'm drinking Columbian Huila
Valencia, Roasted to City+ Tuesday in the Behmor.  Good stuff.  I guess I'm
just saying "You were right and I should have done this earlier".
Gregg
-- 
They say such nice things about people at their funerals that it makes me
sad to realize that I'm going to miss mine by just a few days. - Garrison
Keillor
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

82) From: Michael Dhabolt
Gregg,
Good show.
Mike (just plain)
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

83) From: John and Emma
Well Merry Christmas to all,
I roasted 2lbs yesterday and was ready to grind enough for my Vac Pot this
morning when my grinder ceased. I have a Virtuoso and have been wanting to
upgrade. Unfortunately timing couldn't be worse -  we don't have the
finances for a Super Jolly/Mini or Max Hybrid which are the 3 I wanted to
upgrade to. Maybe Santa will come through tomorrow morning for us.
John H.
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

84) From: michael brown
I'm sorry that happened. What specifically happened with the Virtuoso? How long have you had it?I've had one for several yrs now, have only replaced the blades once. Found out how to calibrate the grind finer for espresso and have loved it even more.
Michael Bb'ham, AL
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

85) From: John and Emma
I've had the V. for 3-4 years. It's been a good grinder and I haven't had
any issues till today. When I run it the blades cease. The motor runs but
the blades don't turn. I took it apart (removed the casing) vacuumed
everything and it starts fine but then blades cease. I have tried it with
and without beans and the same problem occurs. I don't know what else to try
without sending it in for repairs. At this point I can't justify paying any
money to repair it as opposed to replacing it. Go figure, here it is
Christmas eve my family is visiting for 4 days and my grinder acts up.
If anyone has any suggestions I appreciate the advice.
Again Merry Christmas to all.
John H.

86) From: John Mac
John-
The drive gears are made of nylon plastic and from what you describe, yours
have stripped.
If you are at all handy with a few simple tools, the fix is fairly easy. I'm
certain that you can get
the new gears from Baratza and I think the new ones are now metal. Hope this
helps.
Hope you have a Merry Christmas in spite of your grinder giving up the
ghost.
John in Nor Cal
On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 9:19 PM, John and Emma  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

87) From: raymanowen
The Virtuoso grinder is nearly identical with the Maestro and Maestro Plus
grinders.
With the grind adjustment nut set away from the end point at which the bean
hopper may be removed, the failure points are:
   1. brushes approaching wear limit,
   2. dirt, (coffee grounds?) dust under one or both brushes,
   3. dirt, (coffee grounds?) dust in timer microswitch,
   4. dirt, (coffee grounds?) dust in grind limit microswitch,
   5. thermal fuse open,
   6. undefined SNAFU-
1.- test by bumping grinder while grind mode actuated; "fix" is obvious if
it runs momentarily when you bump it.
2, 3, 4.- use keyboard vacuum adapter to clean out these switches
5.- should show a short on continuity test- if not, make it so for testing
purposes- not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any malfunction.
6.- leave it alone; refer maintenance to qualified semi-retired technician.
The Virtuoso burr set was a sintered iron fabrication; has lasted over 5
years in the hands of the meanest of coffee slugs -ro
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

88) From: michael brown
I agree with the suggestions. John, I can't tell from your reply if you've taken the top blade off.  It seems like i had a similar problem at a family reunion. I brought my V. and Chemex to show off (and at the specific request of numerous family members). I was using a large Nicaragua bean that got caught below the plastic top inside the hopper, between it and a lot of bean 'dust' that accumulated in the blades.  I was able to take the top blade off and use a brush to clear away much of the debris.  I didn't have the brush that came with the grinder, it was back home.  Of course it was as bright and early, everyone was nursing their hangovers from the night before, hovering, literally hovering around me as i couldn't get the V to grind. It was bad. Almost scary.Anyway, i hope you can get it working not only for yourself, but so you can share your coffees with family.
Michael Bb'ham, AL
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

89) From: John and Emma
Thank you for the replies. I regularly remove the hopper and blades and
vacuum out the whole machine when cleaning. I also use the brush to clean
the blades. Yesterday I also removed the outer casing to try and look at the
motor and brushes. I vacuumed out the whole interior hoping this would help.
Unfortunately the V. worked but ceased after a few seconds or when I added
any beans. The motor and brushes are encased in a metal cylinder which I
can't figure out how to remove or look inside. I vacuumed the area of the
cylinder where there are two holes or slots at the bottom. 
I am only guessing but John is probably right with it being the drive gears.
I'll have to wait till this week and make some calls to see how much it
costs for new gears and what Baratza has to say.
Thank you all again for posting suggestions. Merry Christmas everyone.
John H.

90) From: miKe mcKoffee
It quits grinding, does the motor stop running or just the burrs stop
turning? 
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

91) From: Herb Morris
Yep - you need a new gear - these were my exact symptoms.
I just replaced my gear and used the guide provided at:http://www.baratza.com/troubleshooting_question.php?id=cg1&code=5I went for replacing the bottom burrs and the shaft at the same time.
Mark the location of each motor wire as they are position dependant.
(Ok - back to lurking)
Regards,
Herb Morris

92) From: John and Emma
Hi miKe,
The motor continues running but the burrs stop turning.
John H.

93) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is good, then indeed highly likely just the gears. 
miKe
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

94) From: John Mac
John-
The replacement gear is now metal and costs $3 plus shipping, you also might
have to replace the gear shaft for an additional $1.
Here are the instructions;http://www.baratza.com/cms/pdf/Gear%20replacement.pdfYou should probably replace your burrs while you're at it, it is not that
difficult and what a difference if you've had yours for a few years.
Hope this helps.
John in Nor Cal
On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 5:39 PM, John and Emma  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast_lists.sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.sweetmariascoffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

95) From: John and Emma
Thanks John. This is great. Thanks miKe for confirmation as well.
John H.


HomeRoast Digest