HomeRoast Digest


Topic: mysteries of taste (4 msgs / 127 lines)
1) From: Michael Jordan
This is a MIME message. If you are reading this text, you may want to 
consider changing to a mail reader or gateway that understands how to 
properly handle MIME multipart messages.
I have a few questions for anyone with an opinion about taste:
 
1. I am  a new-ish home roaster, and I am trying to figure out my own
taste in coffee.  I really like the 'fruity' flavors in good coffees,
but excessive acidity (sourness or brightness depending on how
pessimistic/optimistic you feel) get old real quick.  Are there certain
coffee/roast combinations that can bring out the fruit without being
very acidic?  My guess is that mexicans would be a good candidate, but I
am interested in other's opinions.
 
2. I am not even sure that the premise for question #1 is correct- I
really like some east africans -like Harrar- aren't they quite acidic?
Can anyone rank coffee regions by brightness- I assume Kenya is first. 
 
3. How does the addition of milk affect the perception of brightnes VS
sourness, etc. in coffee?
 
4. Is anyone familiar with Allegro coffee? It is a small roaster in
Colorado that was bought out by Whole Foods.  When I used to live in
Denver (pre-home roast)  I would go to Whole Foods grocery store and
watch them roast the coffee right in front of me in the store.  They
used a big commercial air roaster- probably did 10 lbs at a time, in
about 10-15 minutes.  I found their Mexican and Guat. beans to be
outstanding.  They are still a sort of 'standard'  I keep shooting for
with my home roasts.  I know it is heretical to suggest that I may like
someone else's roast (commercial, no less!) more than my own.... I
wonder what that says about my home roasting efforts so far?
 
Since everyone has their own taste, everyone should have an opinion,
therefore this might be a thread with more participation than any other-
even us lurkers can chime in.  But then again, maybe my math is wrong. 
Because, as we all know, there is no accounting for taste....
 
Michael-Air roasting-Jordan

2) From: Dona & Terry McVay
At 11:37 AM 6/14/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Mike, opinions on taste here are probably no more lucid anywhere else on earth.
But beyond the extremely interesting discussions on 'super tasters' and
taste bud densities, we're the only ones who have access to our own tastebuds,
and in the search for the perfect roast/grind/brew we are truly alone.
So my suggestion is develope a standard for comparing your efforts, keep 
tons of
notes, and enjoy the ride!
Aloha,
Terry McVay
still searching for the key to a consistently heavenly cup of coffee...  in 
Kona

3) From: zigzagmolly
On 6/14/05, Dona & Terry McVay  wrote:
<Snip>
But, I too, prefer certain coffee characteristics and would like to
put words to those characteristics.  I love Peru Norte, but to find
another coffee similar to this, I need some kind of description that
leads me closer to finding it without breaking the bank. I loved
Brazil Cerrado Lot 141 Wagner Ferrero, but what was it that I liked
about it?  I like the Java Government Estate - Blawan and some
Panamas, but again, why? These are coffees I enjoy as a single origin
cup.  Somewhere, there is a description to characterize these and I
can look for that word or words again.   I've looked at Tom's and
others reviews and articles to find some common description, but
nothing I can put my finger on yet.   Some day I will figure it out.
 I know some of it is aroma. There is a certain scent I get from my
favorites that I don't get from other beans.  And it's a great part of
my enjoyment with a particular cup of coffee.  I am blessed (or
cursed-being a nurse, this can be a problem!) with a excellent sense
of smell and I want to breathe in the aroma before I drink my coffee,
while I'm drinking it and when I'm putting the cup down. I want the
smell to waft from my purse if I am carrying some ground coffee for my
4pm fix at work.  And I know I like chocolate tones.  I wonder if I
like full bodied coffees. Don't really know what body really is, but
I'm going to keep trying to find out.  I'll let you know when it
happens.
Take care,
Nancy

4) From: Rick Copple
Michael Jordan wrote:
<Snip>
I'm with you on this!
A good one I would suggest is the Costa Rican Tarrazu El Conquistador. 
Great coffee, forgiving, not real high in acid but plenty of floral and 
fruity flavor to it.
Mexicans would also be a good choice, most of them are "mild". A good 
African coffee that I like is the Tanzanian Songea AAA. It is more 
towards the chocolaty side of things, with some vanilla, but it also is 
not highly acidic.
I think many of the island coffees are also mild, and the Panamas are 
good in that way too. Read Tom's notes as they generally rank them for 
acidity and he tells you what flavors he is tasting.
<Snip>
Probably, I'm not an expert on that, but most people seem to think 
Kenyans *tend* to be on the bright side.
<Snip>
I wouldn't know about that, I rarely put anything into my coffee.
Don't know anything about that roaster either. If you like the coffee, 
however, more power to you! That is really what matters.
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX


HomeRoast Digest