HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Thermocouples (5 msgs / 168 lines)
1) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Thanks Michael - great links. I didn't realize 
Omega offered so many types. So 1/2" NPT is the 
standard - kinda large but do-able.
Tom
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AND_WELL_REF>http://www.omega.com/toc_asp/frameset.html?book=Temperature&f=ile=HEAD_AND_WELL_REF
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ommodity>http://www.omega.com/toc_asp/frameset.html?book=Temperature&file==260_Commodity
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                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom

2) From: Dan Bollinger
Tom,  The thermocouple assemblies are a large, cumbersome, and expensive
solution, to me.   What I have done in my sample roaster, and in other
applications, is to use a makeshift holder for a standard thermocouple
probe.   If you buy a 1/4" x 6" SS probe, you can mount that through your
roaster's front bulkhead without the fancy holder.
To secure it use a brass pipe fitting you can get at any hardware store.
Drill and tap (from the front) for a 1/8" pipe. Screw in a 1/8"NPT to 1/4"
compression adapter fitting. The hole in the 1/8" pipe fitting is just under
1/4", so drill it out using a 17/64" drill.  Then, slip the probe through
the fitting and tighten the nut to hold the probe in place. It is a much
smaller and neater installation.
Dan
Thanks Michael - great links. I didn't realize
Omega offered so many types. So 1/2" NPT is the
standard - kinda large but do-able.

3) From: Michael Dhabolt
This is exactly the procedure I use to mount my TC probe in the ubber poppe=
r 
- I use 1/8" probe and 1/8"NPT x 1/8" compression fitting. Works well, 
permanent, rugged, inexpensive.
 Mike (just plain)
 On 6/27/05, Dan Bollinger  wrote: 
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4) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike, Great minds think alike!  For Tom, since he is using a large drum =
roaster, I suggested the 1/4" probe just for strength issues.  Were do =
you get 1/8" probes?  Dan

5) From: Michael Dhabolt
Dan
I picked up a couple of 'T's several years ago on eBay for a couple bucks=
 
for a different project (computer hot rodding) and have been using one of=
 
them for the ubber popper. I have been questioning the accuracy of my temp=
 
indication in the >440 F range ('T' is recommended for ~212 F range) and am=
 
currently waiting for a 'J' unit to arrive - will upgrade (?) to it when it=
 
arrives.
 I ordered the 'J' and a couple of 'K's from TTI Global. 1/8" x 4" with 
medium temp male TC connectors fixed to the tube is the configuration I 
ordered, cost was ~$20 each. They have them built by another outfit so the=
 
special order is a two to three week wait.
 TTI Global seems to be the favorite source for the Fuji PIDs within the 
coffee crowd, and the folks there (Jason Dooley 800-884-4967) are 
knowledgable about the uses and questions that we come up with. I've ordere=
d 
a fair amount of pieces and parts (PIDs, SSRs, Heat Sinks, SCRs, TCs, TC 
connectors, TC wire) from them and been completely satisfied with the 
service and follow up tech info/support.
http://www.ttiglobal.com/Product.asp?Param1=LC&Param2=60 The reason I forwarded Omega links to Tom is that their site, IMHO, is 
unmatched as a source of information related to thermal knowledge. They are=
 
the historical big boy on the block and although a bit pricey, give 
immediate and good service when needed. Their "Handbooks" are a tremendous=
 
resource and free.
 And I keep going on - -and on - - and on. Only had four restrittae (sp) so=
 
far this AM after the obligatory Cappa. Getting ready to try miKes stash 
reduction blend.
 Mike (just plain)
 
 On 6/27/05, Dan Bollinger  wrote: 
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