HomeRoast Digest


Topic: "afterburning" smoke (7 msgs / 251 lines)
1) From: ginny
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have to get the smoke filled air in order to burn it off?
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how hot?
g

2) From: ginny
phil,
ok...

3) From: Erik Gilling
What is required to burn off the smoke from roasting?  Does it require a 
flame or can it be done with an electric heating coil?  How hot do I 
have to get the smoke filled air in order to burn it off?
-Erik

4) From: Philip Keleshian
I believe that traditionally a gas flame has been used.
Zack and Danni roasters use an electric heating coil but they also have =
a catalytic converter.
Phil

5) From: Philip Keleshian
In other words: What is the minimum temperature required to cause the =
particulates and other compounds in the smoke to be oxidized?
My answer: I don't know, but apparently less with a cat.
Phil

6) From: Dan Bollinger
I believe, but I'm not sure, that you either need an open flame or a
catalytic converter.  I don't think a hot surface, like an electric heater,
will work.  Dan
I believe that traditionally a gas flame has been used.
Zack and Danni roasters use an electric heating coil but they also have a
catalytic converter.
Phil

7) From: Ken Mary
Why do you need/want an afterburner?
For general air pollution control, you need 1400F and 1/2 second residence
time with a luminous flame gas burner. This must exhaust outside due to
nitrogen oxides and other safety concerns. With a catalyst, the temp can be
reduced to 800F or lower. Electric heating may work here, but still should
exhaust outside for safety.
Inquire in alt.coffee.
The Zach & Danni's roaster uses a catalyst but I have no experience with it.
If you have neighbor complaints, then just choose your roast time so the
wind can quickly disperse the smoke and odor. Remember the old saying, "The
solution to pollution is dilution".
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