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Topic: 1st Crack vs 2nd Crack (6 msgs / 147 lines)
1) From: pcevoli
Hi Folks,
I'm still trying to get to knack of my Hottop, I just had to replace my keypad and had no scale so I'll chock up the first few roasts as a learning experience.  So now I'm consistently roast with 250 gm and adequate voltage.
Anyway, While roasting I turn it up to 7 and wait for the right time to eject the beans. Typically after about 13-14 minutes or so I start to hear crackling, it's kinda light but like the first cracks in a batch of popcorn. After a few more minutes it sounds like I'm sitting down to a bowl of Rice Krispies. I try to wait until the cracking stops but some times I'm running right up against the time where the beans are burned. Am I missing the transition between 1st and 2nd crack. Does this make sense? Any thoughts or ideas?
Thanks!
Paul

2) From: Bob Yellin
<Snip>
keypad and had no scale so I'll chock up the first few roasts as a =
learning experience.  So now I'm consistently roast with 250 gm and =
adequate voltage.
<Snip>
eject the beans. Typically after about 13-14 minutes or so I start to =
hear crackling, it's kinda light but like the first cracks in a batch of =
popcorn. After a few more minutes it sounds like I'm sitting down to a =
bowl of Rice Krispies. I try to wait until the cracking stops but some =
times I'm running right up against the time where the beans are burned. =
Am I missing the transition between 1st and 2nd crack. Does this make =
sense? Any thoughts or ideas?
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unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettingsIt sounds like you're getting 1st crack at 13-14 minutes. With a 250-gram
load that's quite normal. It also sounds like 1st is followed very =
shortly
by 2nd crack (Rice Krispies). If you allow 2nd crack to end you will =
indeed
get a very dark roast. 
What's happening is this: the beans reach first crack and go exothermic.
That means that they themselves add heat to the process, accelerating the
roasting process, at or around 1st crack. That's why there's so little =
time
between 1st and 2nd. 
There are a number of things you can do to prevent this but for now, if =
you
don't want to change the process while you're getting used to roasting =
with
the Hottop, consider how you're using the beans. If for espresso, try
stopping the roast a few seconds after you hear the Rice Krispies (2nd
crack) sound. If your shot is too sour, try extending the time by another
15 to 30 seconds, the following roast. 
If you're using the beans for a brewed drink, try stopping the roast just
as the first pops of 2nd starts and if the drink tastes too burnt, work
backwards in time the following roast. I'm sure you'll zero in on the =
best
time for your taste after a few roasts.
Bob Yellin

3) From: Robert Avery
Help me here to Bob, I just got into roasting and spent many years in a lab 
environment .... I guess I know how to watch the gages .... I currently have 
an IRoast and it works very well, Looking forward to larger batches, but 
will need a different machine and am looking at the Hottop. That is if I 
dont try to build something myself. The thing I have noticed and surmize is 
the radical differential on the roast temp in the Iroast. Not linear at all. 
I have looked at some of the published data for the Hottop and the temps are 
a lot more linear. Is there something to be shooting for here .... I know 
the IRoast does a good job, but I find myself watching the end result ... 
color more than the temp, only because a lot happens in a hurry some times. 
This leads me to think that a linear rise in temp would be better if watched 
per batch and when you get to the final temp for the particular bean type be
ing roasted ... What say you Bob, ..... Thanks, Bob
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4) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
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There are so many x factors in roasting, and the coffee itself is one 
of the greatest variables. Where and how you measure temperature is a 
more difficult problem than it may first appear, too. If you do chose 
to "build your own" definitely share the process with the group! With 
each person that takes this route, I think we all learn a little more 
about roasting ...
Tom
-- 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom

5) From: Robert Avery
I appreciate the feedback, I have certainly will keep the group in the loop, 
This is the part that I enjoy the most in this type of hobby, Besides the 
pleasure of drinking the brew .... I enjoy the chase, Thanks again, Bob
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6) From: Aaron
No you are not missing it really.  Beans are different. I have had some 
where the first crack was actually quite loud and plentiful.  I have had 
others where the first crack was just a bit of a crack and kind of 
dragged on.   I have had second cracks like you said where it sounds 
like a bowl full of rice crispies, yet have had second cracks where you 
can barely hear them and they are not really all jumping on the crackin 
bandwagon either.  The key is to watch the color of the beans,  and 
smell a bit.  Listening for the cracks is a good indicator of their 
progress but don't rely on that solely to determine when to dump a batch 
out.  To be honest with you I do a majority of my coffees either at the 
onset of second crack + about 15 seconds or maybe a minute into it at most.
Granted each persons 'taste' in coffee will differ but you don't have to 
let them second crack fully, unless you like a really dark roast.   For 
all practical purposes, the coffee is drinkable after first crack.
Not trying to blow you off or give you a vague answer but you will have 
to experiment and different beans will act differently as well so there 
is no one 'THIS IS IT' answer to this question.
Aaron
Aaron
Paul Cevoli wrote:
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