HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New list member intro (37 msgs / 671 lines)
1) From: Douglas Strait
Hi, my name is Doug. I joined the list a month or so ago and have been 
lurking since then to get a sense of the list culture.
Brief Bio: I am a retired electrical engineer with a career background 
in test engineering. Though it has been well over a decade since I 
have received a paycheck, I find that I still carry my Test Engineer 
methodology into many things that I do. This has certainly been the 
case for coffee roasting and brewing. I can see that there are many 
kindred spirits here on this list. I appreciate the spirit of 
curiosity and disipline of investigation exhibited by many.  You may 
brew your coffee by boiling unroasted beans for 3 hours in a dirty 
sock. I may not try your method, but I am impressed if you have 
carefully controlled all other variables to test whether the results 
are affected by use of cotton vs wool vs polyester socks. I will, 
however, just think you are nuts if you spend much time testing 
whether it matters if the sock was worn on the Left vs Right foot ;-) 
Though retired, I am not particularly geezerly. I quit at an early 
age, not because I amassed any substantial wealth but instead because 
while taking a mid-life break from working I came to appreciate just 
how much working was interferring with my enjoyment of life. I simply 
never went back. I drive a 20 y/o car, have no health insurance, drink 
cheap beer, and live in a small apartment above a friend's garage. One 
concession to frugal living that I have not made, and never will, is 
coffee. For decades I have almost exclusively purchased from specialty 
roasters. I am a newcomer to homeroasting having started just last 
year. Before I even got through the 8 pack sampler from SM, I knew I 
was hooked. To date all of my greens have come from our list hosts Tom 
and Maria, generally in orders ranging from 20 to 35 lbs at a whack. 
I'd be willing to pay an extra dollar a pound for those entertaining 
reviews of Tom's even though I almost never can taste any of that 
stuff he says he does.
I roast in a 1400W Wearever pumper which was given to me by a 
homeroasting cyberspace acquaintance that I met on a non-coffee 
related list. It was an outgrowth of a question I posted soliciting 
recommendations on a replacement for my low-end worn out Braun burr 
grinder. BTW, I ended up getting a Solis Maestro. I don't do espresso 
and have never even had one. I don't what to go there, not because I 
suspect that I wouldn't like it, but because I have no physical space 
for more possessions of any size. Did I mention that I live above a 
garage? If I'm going to *pay* for a beverage that costs $1+/oz, it had 
better be at least 80 proof ;-)  I have recently acquired a small 
Bialetti Mokapot [operative word: small] and like the result. My 
everyday brewing is autodrip, and my camping out of my vehicle [at 
least 50 days/year] method is filtercone drip.
I have learned much from reading the archives of this list as well as 
the roasting forum on coffeegeek that has helped me refine my 
techniques. I really appreciate the efforts of those that have taken 
the time to share their knowledge. It is unlikely that I will have 
anything to offer the Pros here on roasting itself. On the other hand, 
in the arena of equipment modification and testing methodology, I hope 
to me able to mix it up with the best of them. Some readers may find 
some of my future posts to be esoterically technical. I will try to 
post the appropriate warnings in the subject line. In general, I 
keenly recognise and appreciate the good list citizenship of 
maintaining an accurate and informative subject line.
BTW, I (selectively) read the list in digest form so any two way 
exchanges with me will be at digest cycle time at the fastest.
A tip of the cup to all!

2) From:
Doug:
You get the bio of the year award.
Welcome. I really think you should try espresso.
ginny
<Snip>

3) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Doug,
Welcome to the list and glad you've found it helpful.  Any
contribution to the coffee journey (esoterically technical or
otherwise) is always helpful.
Sounds like you have a great setup that works for you.  Be forewarned,
though.  I never thought I'd graduate to Espresso Cum Latte.  But it
happened.  :)
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself in a LaPavoni
(and drip/moka/presspots)
On 8/24/05, Douglas Strait  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Cool! Welcome.
Douglas Strait wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Life in the fast lane ......
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of aribica that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains.
The stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

5) From: Barry Luterman
Welcome. Never thought my wife would graduate to espresso either. Finally 
broke down and started on the espresso route myself in the Spring. Now my 
wife is so hooked we seldom brew coffee anymore. It's a growth experience.

6) From: Les
Brent
 Welcome to the Dark Side!
 Les
I remember "Trying it too" It makes thing a bit tough on the budget. There=
 
is a might fine Expobar - Mazzer Mini offer on Ebay right now.
 On 8/24/05, Brent - SC/TO Roasting  wrote: 
<Snip>

7) From: Tara Kollas
Welcome - I'd be interested in knowing how many on this list are
engineers.  I would be willing to bet it's a pretty high percentage.
Tara
On 8/24/05, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

8) From: Steven Dover
Hmm...all this talk of "graduating" to espresso. I "started" with espresso.
I.e., the quest for a *good* espresso lead me to roast at home. I was not a
drip brew drinker prior to the espresso binge. Later on I "graduated" to
drip/presspot/vac brew etc, etc. - Steve D.

9) From: tom ulmer
fortune teller/self-proclaimed food critic here

10) From: Michael Dhabolt
Douglas,
 Welcome aboard. And be comfortable with the fact that there are some of us=
 
that enjoy the more technical side of the hobby - so don't hold back.
 Mike (just plain)
 On 8/24/05, tom ulmer  wrote: 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
n
<Snip>

11) From: Mike Thompson
Doug Strait wrote: " 
If I'm going to *pay* for a beverage that costs $1+/oz, it had
better be at least 80 proof ;-) "
Doug, many here, including me would say that a good shot of espresso
is easily equal to an 80-proof in its effects..................
Mike

12) From: Rick Farris
Clearly, then, you (and those you speak for) don't drink 80-proof whisky.

13) From: javafool
Welcome Doug, this *can* be a lot cheaper than coffee from Specialty
roasters. It isn't for me, but it certainly could be.
Tara, I would be one of those engineers you mentioned. Purdue, 1970. I like
my toys too much to retire just now, LOL.
Terry

14) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Aug 24, 2005, at 1:09 PM, Douglas Strait wrote:
<Snip>
    Then some more stuff that I cut
Doug,
      Welcome to the list, I'm one that believes an espresso  
extraction is the method that gets the most flavors out of coffee.   
However, a close second that might fit your life style is Turkish  
coffee.  Probably should get another grinder to do it because that  
fine a grind could do in the Solis,   You ought to have a Zass for  
those camping trips anyway.
        Jim Gundlach
             roasting over pecan wood fires in La Place, which is no  
longer an official place, Alabama
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other  
way around."

15) From: Michael Wascher
Mw Tara --- and welcome Doug.
EE University of Akron '75 & MT Steven's Institute of Engineering '01.
BTW: Steven's must have the worst fight soong of any school ever! The 
Fighting Engineers indeed.
--MikeW
On 8/24/05, Tara Kollas  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Not all things that are countable, count, and not all things that count,=
 
are countable". Albert Einstein

16) From: Mike Thompson
LOL, no not whiskey, just reposado tequila.
Mike
On 8/24/05, Rick Farris  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

17) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Tara wrote:
<Snip>
Back in the early 60's my Military Occupational Specialty (M.O.S.)  
was 121.20 Combat Engineer Demolition Specialist.  After the military  
I went to college and got BA, MA, PhD's in sociology.  Probably not  
the kind of engineer you are looking for.
    Jim Gundlach

18) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Not sure if it was a rhetorical question or not:
Anyway, Bsc. Eng - EE University of Saskatchewan 1970
Dave S.
On 8/24/05, *Tara Kollas* > wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Robert Avery
Doug ...welcome aboard .... three cheers for engineers that couldn't take it 
anymore. I too, fell prey to the woe's of the work environment that wasn't 
taking advantage of my skills or couldn't understand how someone could just 
enjoy their job. You know what I mean ... anyway. Hope to learn as well as 
help, Take care, Bob
<Snip>

20) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Sounds like a good guy to have around when the Kopi Luwak hits the fan, 
though...
Gene Smith
hoping his fan blades stay relatively clean, in Houston

21) From: Rick Farris
I've never gotten the single slightest amount of alcohol effects from
espresso.  How did you do it?

22) From: Michael Wascher
No way! 
Asbach Uralt is the way to go:http://www.asbach.de/.It goes well with a=
 
good espresso too.
--MikeW
On 8/24/05, Mike Thompson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Not all things that are countable, count, and not all things that count,=
 
are countable". Albert Einstein

23) From: Robert Avery
Tara ... interesting. I'm not a graduate Engineer, but retired as an 
Mechanical Engineer from a rather large Photographic Comp. here in Central 
New York. Funny how birds of a feather fly together. Learned my trade over 
forty years instead of 4 or 6 years. I was always on to do it the hard way. 
I think you are right though ... it sounds like many on this forum are or if 
they aren't should be. Later, Bob
<Snip>

24) From: Robert Avery
Not sure about that Gene ... I think you fit right in ... at least on some 
days ... Do you have a couch, later, Bob
<Snip>

25) From: holly
<Snip>
Welcome - I'd be interested in knowing how many on this list are
engineers.  I would be willing to bet it's a pretty high percentage.
Tara
Hi Tara,
BS Civil Engineering 1986, outnumbered here by EEs just like in college
Holly

26) From: Les
 On 8/24/05, Rick Farris  wrote: 
<Snip>

27) From: Rick Farris
Civil Engineering -- the only engineering discipline that has a higher
proportion of men than EEs.  Was that the object?  :)

28) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Now that I could get into, but I'd prolly go for a single-barrel bourbon.
-- Rick  
From: Les
Add 2 oz of a good single malt!
A very nice 2x2!

29) From: holly
<Snip>
proportion of men than EEs.  Was that the object?  :)
No, runs in family.  Mom was BSCE Iowa State 1947
Holly
chip off the old block

30) From: Tara Kollas
I don't know - my husband graduated in 1994 from Lehigh University
with an ME - he said the women were pretty scarce.  Given the need to
tinker that my husband has displayed, it seemed a good bet there were
a number of engineers here.  I was a theatre major, so I can just
pretend I've finxed something...
Tara
On 8/24/05, Rick Farris  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

31) From: Brett Mason
Welcome Doug,
This is a great family to be a part of.  I like the zen experience of
outdoor skillet roasting - melding with the green, drawing out the
moisture, seeing th eyellow of wheatfields, the golden tan from
California, the darkening of cocoa and the rich dark chocolate - yep
that does it for me!  So I moved to Iowa and working at bringing it
indoors... so for me it is the joy ride, not the metrics..
Glad you're here!
Brett
On 8/24/05, Douglas Strait  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

32) From: Douglas Strait
Thanks to all for the warm welcome.
@Tara: Engineers! It looks like this place is lousy with them.
@ javafool: Hi, I believe you may be the same javafool that helped 
guide me to this passion via a non-coffee list.
@ Pecan Jim who wrote >You ought to have a Zass for those camping 
trips anyway.<
Certainly good advise which has already been taken. I have a Zass 
kneemill. While I really liked the visual aesthetics of the Zass 
kneemill, I soon found that I wished the bean hopper and drawer were 
larger. I recently went on an Ebay binge trying to find a manual mill 
with larger capacity and equal or better grind quality. I finally 
found one that fit the requirement. It is a [almost certainly no 
longer manufactured] unbranded open hopper mill of German origin. 
While it is unlikely that I will be buying a $500 mill anytime soon, I 
did find myself spending quite a bit of time looking at various grinds 
thru my $1000+ B&L Stereozoom microscope! Priorities. BTW, I don't 
know were La Place, AL, is but I'm in Northwest GA.
@Brett who wrote >This is a great family to be a part of.  I like the 
zen experience of outdoor skillet roasting - melding with the green, 
drawing out the moisture, seeing th eyellow of wheatfields, the golden 
tan from California, the darkening of cocoa and the rich dark 
chocolate - yep that does it for me!  So I moved to Iowa and working 
at bringing it
indoors... so for me it is the joy ride, not the metrics.<
I'm with you there, Buddy. I exclusively roast outdoors. I would add 
to your list of pleasures the gentle snowfall of chaff all about and 
on me. My only chaff collectors are the great outdoors and my beard.
@David Y: Your challenge merits a separate post.

33) From: Alchemist John
Here, here Rick :-)
Welcome Doug - I think you will find you can't really get to 
technical or to basic here.
At 14:01 8/24/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

34) From: David Yeager
At 07:45 AM 8/25/2005, you wrote:
 >Thanks to all for the warm welcome.
 >
 >I'm in Northwest GA.
 >
 >@David Y: Your challenge merits a separate post.
Yes, a separate post and probably a new Subject line.
Some recent posts on extraction and dilution caught my interest, 
hence the question.  Perhaps the empirical part should better have 
been directed to the chemists among us.
Northwest GA, as in Chattanooga suburb?
David Y
Atlanta

35) From: Angelo
Probably, the cheapest grinder for Turkish would be a blade grinder. Why 
wear down the burrs on a "good" grinder? Just grind to powder...
Angelo
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.15/80 - Release Date: 8/23/2005

36) From: John David Huddle
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
OOOOO!  A stereozoom microscope.  COOL toy!!
I collect/shoot stereo cameras.    Always wanted a stereo microscope too.
I understand the  "Priorities"
Dave    ( a chemist - NOT an engineer)
Westerville, OH

37) From:
A Tardy Welcome from a guy whose computer clock has a pendulum! [I thought=
 
they said it had a Pentium!]
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 8/25/05, Angelo  wrote:
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d
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5
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the 
Wichita WurliTzer


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