HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Advice needed designing my new drum (14 msgs / 416 lines)
1) From: Derek Bradford
Hi All,
I'm reworking the Roaster previously known as Ugly into something much
more attractive and functional.  I've aquired some addtional tools--a
pop rivet gun and a pair of tin snips.  What a difference the tin
snips have made.  Anyway, I've found some great items to make my new
drum out of at a kitchen supply market here in Seoul, and need a
little help designing the vanes for it.
What I'd like to know is the following:
How many vanes should I have?
Should they be angled, and if so, to what degree, and in what
direction (oriented the same as the drum turns, or opposite)?
How long should the vanes be?
The drum's dimensions are:
Height: 17.5cm
Diameter: 16cm
(Excluding cone, of course)
You can see the new drum athttp://uglyroaster.blogspot.com.It's unfinished; all I've actually done is test-fit the cone to the drum.
Thanks for your help,
--Derek

2) From: tom ulmer
I hope Ed Needham steps in here.
When considering the vanes in my latest drum I decided to mount them at
slight biases to move the beans from end to end and back again. My reasoning
was that if for some reason one part of the drum was hotter that eventually
no beans would remain in a single plane. I don't think it ultimately matters
but I like the vanes mounted where the flat side meets the beans first in
the rotation.
By the way, I didn't find anything ugly about your roaster. I used a small
portable gas grill for its housing and burner mechanism. It wasn't quite
rounded enough on the lid until I did a little metal work wit a 5 lb. sledge
hammer and a couple of 2x4s that truly qualifies as ugly.

3) From: Dan Bollinger
Derek,  I recommend 6 vanes for you drum, each 2-3cm high.  Just point them
towards the center of the drum, no need for fancy angles. Make the vanes
17.5cm long. Make them full length.  Dan
Hi All,
I'm reworking the Roaster previously known as Ugly into something much
more attractive and functional.  I've aquired some addtional tools--a
pop rivet gun and a pair of tin snips.  What a difference the tin
snips have made.  Anyway, I've found some great items to make my new
drum out of at a kitchen supply market here in Seoul, and need a
little help designing the vanes for it.
What I'd like to know is the following:
How many vanes should I have?
Should they be angled, and if so, to what degree, and in what
direction (oriented the same as the drum turns, or opposite)?
How long should the vanes be?
The drum's dimensions are:
Height: 17.5cm
Diameter: 16cm
(Excluding cone, of course)
You can see the new drum athttp://uglyroaster.blogspot.com.It's unfinished; all I've actually done is test-fit the cone to the drum.
Thanks for your help,
--Derek

4) From: Michael Dhabolt
Derek,
 You commented on your blog that you are having a hard time finding "pop 
rivets". If this supply issue has not been solved - send me an email 
off-list and I'll get some headed your way. I'm getting a lot of enjoyment=
 
out of your project, and would love to make a contribution.
 Mike (just plain)
 On 8/26/05, tom ulmer  wrote: 
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5) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Aug 26, 2005, at 1:10 PM, tom ulmer wrote:
<Snip>
When I made my home made drums, I set all my vanes to push the beans  
to the center.  General tumbling then disperses them back to the  
side.  My mental image of what is going on is a constant cycling from  
side to center and then out to side again.  I wanted side to side  
agitation as well as from outside to inside in case the heat was  
unevenly distributed along the length of the drum.
    Jim Gundlach
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other  
way around."

6) From: Robert Avery
Derek ,,,, I like the new drum. I think you'll have a lot better luck with 
it. To me the first couple of roast look like you had some hot spots ... I'm 
assuming you are using the new drum ???? Anyway. I got to thinking about 
this the other day .. and I believe someone else really suggested it, but 
after looking at my gass cooker outside, I noticed there is a heat 
deflection plate. Sort of a flat plate mounted over the burner to knock down 
the initial heat from the flame and distribute it more evenly. I would think 
that would look like a small card table mounted over  the burner a couple of 
inches above the burner ... what do you think, Bob
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7) From: R.N.Kyle
Derek I would make a vane that would be about 4cm in height total 4 =
vanes 2
which are straight and run the length of the drum directly opposed from =
each
other. 2 vanes angled and mounted in the same direction not opposite and
make them 1" shorter then the length of the drum positioned opposed to =
each
other.and center them in the drum allowing 1/2" gap on each end. If you
mount them at opposite directions which seems the way to do it (but is =
not)
as the drum turns it dumps the beans the same direction. by mounting =
them
the same direction about 15degrees
as the drum turns it moves the beans front to back.
RK

8) From: Derek Bradford
Thank you Mike...  However, I did finally find pop rivets.  Things are
a little strange here--nobody does their own repair work, so nobody
has their own tools.  And since nobody does their own repair work,
nobody has bothered opening a proper hardware store.  I have no idea
where contractors are getting their stuff--the Koreans I work with
don't know anything about that, and generally think I'm nuts for
making this thing.  Most of them don't even have a hammer and a
selection of screwdrivers.  Any tools they have consist of allen keys
that came with build-it-yourself furniture.
That said, I've found an online store where I can buy tools, but they
have no store I can physically browse.  Where's the fun in that? 
There's a furniture/appliance recycler nearby, so I'm going there
tonight to see if I can buy some stuff--sheet metal and motors would
be ideal, but I'm not holding my breath.
On 8/27/05, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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-- 
Check out my blog--catch up with me on YOUR schedule, not mine.http://novernae.blogspot.com

9) From: Derek Bradford
Actually, if there are hot spots, they're from the old drum.  The old
one has two vanes running the length of the drum, and are just under
2cm high.
I mentioned using some stainless steel mesh as a heat diffuser during
the last exchange, but nobody picked up on it.  I suspect that a solid
sheet might work better for this--I'll try it and see what happens.
On 8/27/05, Robert Avery  wrote:
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Check out my blog--catch up with me on YOUR schedule, not mine.http://novernae.blogspot.com

10) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Aug 26, 2005, at 9:14 PM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>
Talk about culture shock!  I might just die from tool withdrawal.
      Jim Gundlach

11) From:
DB- 
That's a very practical looking drum you whipped up. At Taegu, (Ahn yong 
hasim ni ka!) people heated with coal briquettes. Now I wonder- maybe you=
 
could swap a Wok for the clay firebox cover and roast that way. It was good=
 
enough for the ubiquitous Kimchi !
I second the thought about the fasteners or any other hardware pieces you=
 
might need. Maybe some S/S blind("Pop") rivets?
Keep it up, man!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!

12) From: Michael Vanecek
Methinks that's spelled "Annyong ha shimnikka". Lotsa words to just say 
"Hi". :)
Hee - I remebered "thank you" with "Come Saw My Dog" for 
"gomabseumnida". Of course that's better than the Japanese phonetic 
device "Don't Touch My Mustache" for "do itashi mashite". :)
DB - Daaaaannnng - nothing ugly to that drum at all!!! Heck, you even 
make a common tin can look great!!! Very inspirational - was thinking 
about getting one of the RK Drums - but money is short since I just 
dumped it on a new Taig lathe - I may take a large coffee can and see 
what I can whip up... At least until I can get an RK. I also want one of 
those la Pavoni's on yoru site too. The brass one. Sigh...
Okay - perhaps 4 or 5 vanes? You may get by with three even - depends on 
how much coffee you'll have - 4 may be better - the Alp uses 5. Angle 
them so that the coffee is stirred towards the back of the drum during 
roasting, and when you reverse the spin, towards the spout. That's how 
my Alps are set up anyway... As to the degree - eek - couldn't help much 
there. The Alp's vanes aren't all that extreme tho. This page with 
images of the Alp's drum may have some inspiration:http://www.sweetmarias.com/hottoppics/hottop.druminterior.jpgOne long small vane circling the drum a couple of times. Can't tell - is ">http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.swissmar-alpenrost2.shtmlOr you could try something like the HotTop:http://www.sweetmarias.com/hottoppics/hottop.druminterior.jpgOne long small vane circling the drum a couple of times. Can't tell - is 
it spot-welded? The Alp's are spot-welded on...
Ahn nyung hee ke se yo,
Mike
--http://www.taroandti.com/http://www.mjv.com/
raymanowen wrote:
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13) From: Robert Avery
Jim ... dont be to quick .... I always do my own repair work. I guess I'll 
have to do a blog on my shop here .... I'll keep ya posted. Later, Bob
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14) From: Derek Bradford
...So much work just to greet people.  As for the brass Pavoni, I can
only recommend getting the brass if you intend to be meticulously
careful around it.  It's a pretty soft metal, and it scratches quite
easily.  Still, they're really pretty.  They're great machines--you
really learn a lot about the espresso process.
Nice shot of the Hottop drum.  
On 8/27/05, Michael Vanecek  wrote:
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
Check out my blog--catch up with me on YOUR schedule, not mine.http://novernae.blogspot.com


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