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Topic: newbie roasting question (4 msgs / 63 lines)
1) From: Carl Jensen
Hey all:
 
I just purchased an IRoast 1.0 from Sweet Marias and have a question about roasting smaller quantities of beans. I received 8-1/4 lb bags of coffee with my order, and after following the iRoast directions for roasting about 1 cup of beans, I now have about 1/2 cup of beans left in one of my bags, which is less than the programs are set up to roast. What do you think is the best way to handle this? Should I set up a custom program for about 1/2 the time of a normal roast for 1/2 the amount of beans? Should I (god forbid) roast 2 types at once? Thanks for any creative ideas.
 
Carl Jensen

2) From: MMore
Why not try holding onto it, seeing how you like the flavors of some of the  
ones you've already roasted, and blending it with that to see what you come up 
 with?  I guarantee it will still be better than anything you can buy  
commercially!
 
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna,  Va.

3) From: James Pratt
<Snip>
I usually end up roasting blends of beans with the leavings from bags;
When I'm doing this, I'll TRY to pick varieties that not only seem like
they might go together, but also ones that require somewhere near the
same degree of roast. If you do roast a smaller-sized batch, you'll
probably want to actually increase the length of time you use for your
later stages and maybe decrease the amount of time for the first stage
(where you're just trying to get the beans up into the neighborhood) -
the reason for this is that with the reduced loading on the air column
that the roaster produces, the air will actually zip by the heating
element and beans faster, and won't get as hot or transfer heat as
quickly. (OTOH, you could also partially block the vents of the chaff
collector. Since I suspect that you probably don't want to do this too
often and hence don't want to figure out exactly how much to reduce
flow for optimal effect, I'd suggest using a method for partially
blocking the air flow that would allow you to adjust things "on the
fly" - what I've used (and this method works with extremely low-chaff
beans, as well) is to hold a piece of cardboard (actually part of an
old Abita Beer sixpack holder) over one side of the vent. Obviously,
you need to monitor whether it's getting too hot - fingers work pretty
well - but at least when I've done it, the cardboard hasn't gotten even
close to charring or catching fire. I'm sure that you could devise
something a lot less flammable to use for this job, but since I don't
do it too often, I tend to use what is at hand and have no reason to
change.) 
               James

4) From: Demian Ebert
If I only have a few beans left I tend to just toss them into a "leftovers"=
 
bag and when that gets to the point I could roast a full 150 gm batch, I 
roast it. It's sort of a grab-bag approach and completely unreproducable. I=
f 
there's a half a batch left, sometimes I'll pull out the ol' Toastmaster an=
d 
roast it that way, or blend with a complementary bean. For example, on 
Sunday I roasted the last of my PNG Kimmel. I only had about 112 gm so I 
added enough Kenya AA to make the 150 load size. The theory was that the 
Kenya would add a bit of zing and complexity to the PNG. Haven't tried it=
 
yet but it smelled quite nice this morning. 
 Demian


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