HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Back to basics (9 msgs / 220 lines)
1) From: Michael Smith
Hey all,
 
Sort of new here.  I've been lurking for awhile.  I noticed a trend towards "getting back to basics" in my coffee life and I wondered if anyone else had experienced this.  Here's what's been happening:  First I quit using an auto drip and went to a pour over and a french press, next I learned to roast on the stovetop, now I'm adding a Zass grinder to the mix.  I'm to the point where if I have sufficient heat, I can make coffee.  No electricity required.  I'm finding I really enjoy the all manual, hands-on approach to coffee.  Has anyone else gone this route?  What do like most about it?  What do you like the least?  For me I like the simplicity, but I also find it more difficult to achieve repeatability.
 
Mike
Cadillac, MI

2) From: mIke mcKoffee
While I have and can take coffee from greens to cup with nothing but some
chunks of wood, a skillet to toss or stir roast the beans, a mortar & pestal
to grind 'em and a pot to heat water over the hot embers I prefer higher
tech methods for day to day. 100% manual with no electricity or gas fuel
required is a good skill to have though and can be fun especially if you've
never done it. 
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Smith
	Sent: Wednesday, October 26, 2005 7:34 PM
	
	Hey all,
	 
	Sort of new here.  I've been lurking for awhile.  I noticed a trend
towards "getting back to basics" in my coffee life and I wondered if anyone
else had experienced this.  Here's what's been happening:  First I quit
using an auto drip and went to a pour over and a french press, next I
learned to roast on the stovetop, now I'm adding a Zass grinder to the mix.
I'm to the point where if I have sufficient heat, I can make coffee.  No
electricity required.  I'm finding I really enjoy the all manual, hands-on
approach to coffee.  Has anyone else gone this route?  What do like most
about it?  What do you like the least?  For me I like the simplicity, but I
also find it more difficult to achieve repeatability.
	 
	Mike
	Cadillac, MI

3) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Mike,
       I have made cowboy coffee over a wood fire from beans ground  
by hand power in a Zass and roasted over a wood fire in an Androck  
over the fire popcorn popper.  I did use matches rather than strike  
flint or spin a stick.
      Jim Gundlach
On Oct 26, 2005, at 9:33 PM, Michael Smith wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Derek Bradford
When I lived in Argentina, I used to grind my beans, which I carried
with me from Guatemala, with a rolling pin, placing the beans in a
ziploc bag, and wrapping that with a bandana.  Coffee was prepared
Argentine-style on the stove, brought to just shy of boiling, and then
strained.  It was great.
On 10/27/05, Pecan Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
The Uglyroast 2 Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 40% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

5) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Oct 27, 2005, at 4:45 AM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>
Quite similar to cowboy style up to the straining.   Cowboys don't  
bother with that luxery.
    Jim Gundlach
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other  
way around."

6) From: Alex Harvey
Hi Homeroasters,
I have done 7 or 8 roasts in my popcorn popper/Turbo oven roaster (black UFO
modded stirrer, disabled heater). The results have been very hit and miss.
I like a light roast, and I found my roasts were often coming out with too
much burnt flavour for me.
However my attempts at stopping before this have mostly resulted in under
done sour coffee.
I have been setting my Turbo Oven (a sunpentown digital) for 360 and then
increasing the temperature as the roast progresses, stopping around first
crack by which time oven temp (according to digital read out) is about 430.
I think that often I have not let first crack finish because the bean begin
to look overdone and often have some divots(?) before it finishes. Some
posts I have read suggest starting the turbo oven full-blast and then
reducing temp as roast progresses, would this be a better way to proceed?
I write seeking a basic profile that I can start afresh with to try and get
better results.
I have access to a IR thermometer but have not really trusted the results
and so stopped using it but with my lack of progression I am resolving to
get more scientific and take temps and notes on what I did and the results.
I am using some quite cheap sumatran, brazilian and columbian beans. They
seem of good enough quality for me to learn with.
Thanks
Alex
-- 
Alex Harvey
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7) From: Brian Kamnetz
I had similar results when I first started roasting using a hot-air
popper. It was very frustrating. The beans would be a black oily mess,
burned, but yet have the thin, sour flavor associated with
under-roasting.
The problem was that I was roasting too fast. The roasts went into
first crack and then blended right into second crack. But it was just
the outside of the beans; the insides were still unroasted.
With the hot air popper, the "cure" was to drop from 2/3 cup of greens
down to 1/3 cup of greens. Once I did that, the roasts slowed down so
that I had a distinct first crack, then a substantial pause, then went
into second crack. I eventually increased the load to 1/2 cup with
good results, but any more than that would cause the roast to "race".
I don't know if this is similar to what is happening to you or not,
but the results sound similar, so I thought I would mention it just in
case. And if this is what is happening to you, I am unable to tell you
the "fix" with your roasting set-up.
Brian
On Wed, Jan 5, 2011 at 1:32 PM, Alex Harvey  wrote:
<Snip>
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8) From: Alex Harvey
Brian
I think you are correct on the diagnosis: roasting too fast; burnt outside,
underdone inside. I will search for solutions to this problem with SC/TO
roasters.
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9) From: Larry Dorman
I've been happily using an scto setup for years.
*  If the sc element is still active then allow for the fact that it
is adding heat. Mine is still connected and after testing I prefer it
that way.
*  I usually set my analog TO (also sunpentown) to 330 for 8-10
minutes to start.  I then increase the heat to 360-370 and that takes
right into first crack if it hadn't already hit. Right after 1st I
lower back to 330. If I want second crack and it doesn't happen after
a couple minutes then I'll increase the heat again for a short time
until it hits.
*  I will lift the edge of the SC periodically to let it purge chaff.
This undoubtedly causes some heat loss.
*  I have a 1" wide aluminum yartdstick that I've shaped into a circle
with a hole drilled every inch to provide a spacer between the SC and
the TO. Without this .5 pound or more will get the results you're
describing.
* I've modified the SC arms to be paddles instead of wires. Without
something like this there won't be sufficient bean movement.
So...  Like others have said, it sounds like your roasts are happening
too hot and too fast.  Please let me know if I can be of any help.
LarryD
On 1/6/11, Alex Harvey  wrote:
<Snip>
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