HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Need BBQ Encouragement (12 msgs / 424 lines)
1) From: Jeff Oien
I'll be using the RK Drum and motor for the first time
soon. I'm nervous because I will eventually be roasting
anywhere from 1/2 lb or smaller up to 3 1/2 lbs. The temp
thing seems so nebulous. If I want to have the beans at
300 degrees for 3-4 minutes there's really no way of
knowing that. And if grill temps go higher for larger
batches it's hard to know how much more to preheat and
how much higher a temp first crack occurs at. Any
guidelines? Sorry for all the words.
Jeff

2) From:
Jeff:
I got a high end BBQ temp guage and mounted it about dead center on the hood.
I also have a digital therm that is snaked into the hood.
Check www.terrystockdale.com and you will see what I am talking about.
Not to worry. You will be fine.
ginny
<Snip>

3) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- badabingbadabean wrote:
<Snip>
   Eventually...;o) Les has posted some fairly
straightforward profiles for grill/RK roasting, for a lb.
or so. Ron's website has that, as well as the list
archives. For roasting larger amounts it's _*different*_. I
started off with bigger batch roasts trying to get a slow
steady ramp up to first crack, going by grill thermometer
readings. Now I start with a very hot grill, full gas, and
keep the gas high until about 4 minutes before my favorite
first crack starting time for large batches (12+1/2
minutes), and start a slow grill temp ramp down to first
crack starting, then a a faster ramp down to starting
second crack,or stopping before second. Some gas increase
just before second crack, maybe, but not much. Gas at
lowest setting or turned off when second crack starts. With
a one lb. batch I have to be very carefully be ramping UP
the temps after first crack starts, after having just come
down a little for a couple of minutes to start first What
exact temps I'm looking at only apply to my thermometer,
you have to find out what your own thermometer readings
mean, by trial and error-keep notes! Your favorite roast
results may well come from using different profiles,
anyway, and some beans need special treatment (Monsooned
Malabar!). When I get to use a commercial roaster with a
bean probe thermometer it's easy to see how the same
profile looks from the bean's point of view, instead of the
roaster's.. With the grill setup it's a different
viewpoint, but you can get to the same end result, with
practice.
 Buena suerte and have fun.
  Charlie
<Snip>
                                         Oaxaca dreamin' 
Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005 http://mail.yahoo.com

4) From: paulsack
Quoting Jeff Oien :
<Snip>
I'm using an RK Drum. It's a lot of fun. Good thing you're starting with the RK
motor. Using a rotisserie motor is a bit of a pain.
Anyways, the temp thing is hard. And you probably won't be able to use other
people's temperatures, unless your setup is identical. For mine, I try to get
the built-in thermometer at the top of the grill to around 430 and my analog
thermometer (from SM) to around 550--its tip is just a bit lower than the axis
of the drum.
Start off with a few 1/2 lb roasts of some coffee you don't like too much or are
inexpensive . It's probably not that important at first to follow
profiles--just try to get first crack in 9-13 minutes and second 3-4 minutes
later. If it goes too fast, cool it down 20 degrees--too fast, add 20 degrees.
Make sure the pin is in well. It's the worst feeling when it comes out mid-roast
and all the coffee comes out.
I've also found that any wind takes a lot of heat away. I don't have a shed or a
garage, so this weekend I'm building an insulating cover out of Kaowool and
covering the outside with spray-on rubber (I didn't know until after I ordered
it that Kaowool is dangerous stuff.)
I wouldn't worry that much about profiles for 3 lb vs 1/2 lb roasts. The beans
themselves are still going to enter 1st and 2nd crack at the same temperatures,
however you will need a higher ambient temperature outside the drum to get the
same timing. I bet if you take your 1/2 lb temperature numbers and bump them up
20 degrees, you'll be close enough for your first 3 lb batch, and then you can
refine it some more. Everyone's grill and environment is unique, so I think you
have to figure these things out for yourself. Serious coffee people can get
really obsessive about roasting profiles and shot-pulling profiles and so on,
but I think it takes a lot of experience for you to notice these things--I hope
to get there one day, but for now I'm happy if I get close.
I'm still waiting for the Scace roasting device--some kind of material with the
same thermal properties as a coffee bean with a built-in bluetooth
thermocouple.
Wow, I rambled on way too much.
Cheers,
-Paul

5) From: MMore
I am following this thread with much interest as I have been considering an  
RK for myself.  A couple of questions, though:
How much does the outside air temperature affect the roast/roast  profile?  I 
live in the Washington, D.C., so we get quite cold for the next  several 
months.
 
How many roasts can you get with one propane tank?
 
I currently have a gas grill (Ducane).  Is it recommended that I buy a  
sperate one to be used exclusively for roasting?
 
Thanks, all
 
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna,  Va.

6) From: mIke mcKoffee
While I haven't and don't plan to go the the gas grill drum coffee roasting
route I have a fair amount of outdoor cooking experience so will attempt a
answer or two.
Ambient temp won't effect your roasts assuming you have the BTU's to
compensate. It's the internal dome temp that matters. 
If I was to drum roast on a gas grill it would be a dedicated setup for a
couple reasons. First the hassle of setup for roasting versus other cooking
but primarily I wouldn't want any residuals from cooking being burned off to
"flavor" the coffee roast.
I have no idea how many roasts per tank, and of course would depend on many
factors including the grill setup and tank size! I'd get quite a few roasts
from my 120gal propane tank;-)
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of MMore
	Sent: Thursday, October 27, 2005 2:08 PM
	
		I am following this thread with much interest as I have been
considering an RK for myself.  A couple of questions, though:
	How much does the outside air temperature affect the roast/roast
profile?  I live in the Washington, D.C., so we get quite cold for the next
several months.
	 
	How many roasts can you get with one propane tank?
	 
	I currently have a gas grill (Ducane).  Is it recommended that I buy
a sperate one to be used exclusively for roasting?
	 
	Thanks, all
	 
	Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

7) From: R.N.Kyle
There were many good replies to this thread. First things first, each =
grill
and set up are unique and will vary. I found that placement of the
thermometer is important, and I like it dead center of the drums length =
and
axis. Like Charlie and Les I like to have my grill on high and preheat =
to
about 520 degrees before loading the drum into the grill. I leave the =
heat
on high for the first 4 min. and ramp it down so it reaches the target =
temp.
at about 8 to 10min.
I have found, at least with my 36K fiesta grill that for each additional =
lb
of green I need to raise the target temp by 25 degrees to keep the times
within the 20 min finish target.
For me target temps are as follows
1/2 to 1 lb   430
2 lbs 455
3 lbs 480
4 lbs 505
As first get going I lower the temp and let it coast thru first as the =
beans
themselves have absorbed enough heat to start giving off heat themselves =
so
they don't need as much heat from the burner. as first slows to a stop I
raise the heat a bit and bring it back up to target. I try to get at =
least 4
min between the beginning of first to the end of my roast.
If second does not start by then I bump the heat to high and push the =
roast
into 2nd crack and quickly cut the heat to low and coast to the finish.
Remember to allow yourself at least 30 sec to raise the hood stop the =
drum
and pull the pin and emptily the roast into the cooling devise. You get
quicker with practice and starting with a new drum and new grill it will
take  5 to 7 batches to  season the drum and grill so the temps become =
more
stable for repeatable roasts.
I get about 30 sessions from a 20lb tank.
Cold weather roasting requires more btu's I recommend at least 45 k  or
more. In the south 30 k is good.
hope this helps and if you need additional help just email me or ask the
list.
RK

8) From: Alchemist John
We have found that wind can make a major difference though.  With an 
uninsulated grill, a wind carries the heat away faster than most 
grills can compensate for.
At 17:01 10/27/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

9) From: Terry Stockdale
That means I can roast more easily in cold weather than during the 
summer.  In good old Baton Rouge summertime, I have to throttle the 
valves to minimum and then often have to prop the lid up about 1/2" 
during the last 3-4 minutes.  Otherwise, my grill gets too hot.
Oh, well.  Roasting in a light coat and gloves or roasting in shorts, 
knit shirt and sweat.  What a choice. ;-)
Would I go back to air-roasting or a Hottop?  No Way!
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My blog: http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffeeMy home theater site: http://www.TerrysHomeTheater.comMy tips site and free newsletter: http://www.TerrysComputerTips.comAt 07:22 AM 10/28/2005, you wrote:">http://www.TheNextWindow.comMy coffee pages:http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffeeMy home theater site: http://www.TerrysHomeTheater.comMy tips site and free newsletter: http://www.TerrysComputerTips.comAt 07:22 AM 10/28/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Les
I am getting caught up on the emails. I don't know if I should share this,
but I will. I don't even use a temperature gauge much anymore. I have my
profiles worked out and my settings on my grill worked out and my timer. I
use my nose to make fine adjustments by smell. With experience you know wha=
t
the bean is doing when. In the last 20 roasts only one came out a bit
lighter than planned. The key for me is I roast in the garage and the
temperature and lack of wind keep that constant as well. Once you understan=
d
the principles of roasting, you don't have to see. Smell, time and listenin=
g
to the cracks are much more important. I used to have the radio on in the
garage while roasting. I don't anymore because it was interfering with my
ability to hear the cracks. Temperature gauges and sight are not as reliabl=
e
as one might think in my opinion.
 Les
 On 10/28/05, Terry Stockdale  wrote:
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t
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11) From: mIke mcKoffee
I tend to agree of all the senses sight is the least important roasting
coffee. At least after gaining some roasting experience. When I first
started roasting (stock Rosto) seeing the beans was more important.
Specifically if I saw any oil developing on the Roast for most beans it
meant STOP NOW it's already too far into the roast! Seeing oil developing on
something like Kona can give you a panic attack! As experience is gained
smell eclipses sight in value and accuracy. But those first few months
roasting I kept a flashlight handy to really see the beans through the glass
Rosto top!
While I roast with temp gauge in the beans and control the roast profile
based on temp over time ramp rates, and "target" known finish temps, I stop
the roast by smell and sound. And anticipated bean developments at certain
temps are verified by sound, like start of 1st, end of 1st and if going for
FC barest start of 2nd etc. Those vary from bean to bean of course. Temp
gauges are reliable as a tool, especially if roasting a known bean
attempting to duplicate a known roast result. Less reliable for first roasts
of an unknown bean attempting to replicate a roast result of another bean.
But valuable in following a profile and then adjusting the profile for
different results of same bean. I'm talking as much or more about the
effects of different profiles on the same finish degree of roast not City
versus French type of thing.
I also tend to believe temp gauges must have value in roasting coffee since
IIRC Tom and his Probat use them!-)
It's all good, all about enjoying the journey.
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
	Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 8:46 AM
	
	I am getting caught up on the emails.  I don't know if I should
share this, but I will.  I don't even use a temperature gauge much anymore.
I have my profiles worked out and my settings on my grill worked out and my
timer.  I use my nose to make fine adjustments by smell.  With experience
you know what the bean is doing when.  In the last 20 roasts only one came
out a bit lighter than planned.  The key for me is I roast in the garage and
the temperature and lack of wind keep that constant as well.  Once you
understand the principles of roasting, you don't have to see.  Smell, time
and listening to the cracks are much more important.  I used to have the
radio on in the garage while roasting.  I don't anymore because it was
interfering with my ability to hear the cracks.  Temperature gauges and
sight are not as reliable as one might think in my opinion. 
	 
	Les

12) From: Tim TenClay
I used to pay particular attention to color...than I moved to
sound....now I probably balance sound and smell....Smell is becoming
more and more important as I roast more.
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
On 11/2/05, mIke mcKoffee  wrote:
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--
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog


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