HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Aged not Old Sumatra >was RE: +Kona Eggnogg Machiatto Afternoon Yum! (85 lines)
1) From: mIke mcKoffee
Yes, Sumatra by it's nature usually has great bass notes. But I was
referring to "Aged" not "old" Sumatra. Specifically the Aged Sumatra
Mandheling '98 that Tom carried in 2001 and I'd had some vac bag sealed
'till earlier this year. Aged coffees have unique different bass notes found
in no other coffees. 
Tom's write up:
"Notes: This is a aged coffee that originated with '98 crop Manheling Grade
1 and was held in Sumatra 3 years for the aging process. Aged coffees are
not simply old coffee. You can't just put some green coffee in your basement
for 3 years and end up with aged coffee (although its fun to see what you
get -other than moldy coffee!) The process has to occur in a controlled
environment in the country of origin with apporpriate climate to prevent the
coffee from drying out. The bags are turned and rotated in their stacks
every so often, and the rebagged before shipping. It costs a lot to hold
onto a stock of coffee like this, and the final results can be disasterous!
The coffee can be ruined at any point along the way, and result in a total
loss. I have cupped terrible Aged coffees that someone is attempting to pass
off (with little luck). But this Aged Sumatra is wonderful... It has no
acidity, tons of body, and wonderful soft aged flavors: very chocolatey,
smokey, spicey, pungent, with a very long wonderful aftertaste. Please note
that this is a new lot (as of 7/01) and is more potent that the Pwani lot we
had before. We bought this lot because I feel it has a more "aged" quality
and more powerful cup, although it is a little less attractive than the
Pwani. It has the look of a true aged coffee: yellow orange. We also stock
the Aged Java Old Brown which is an even more potent Aged coffee: extremely
pungent, smokey, with a very aggressive bite. This coffee is exceptional in
espresso blends and not bad as a straight roast espresso ...not bad at all!"http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.arch2001-02.pt4.htmlI'm saving the last # my "Old Brown" Aged Java 96/97 for next year's PNW
Gathering. Or at last part of it;-)
Unfortunately it seems it's been some time since Tom has found a good aged
Indonesian to offer. Wonderful stuff in espresso blends.
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Sandy Andina
	Sent: Monday, October 31, 2005 11:43 PM
	
	Ooooh--got a couple of pounds on its way to me, expected Wednesday!
	
	On Nov 1, 2005, at 1:21 AM, raymanowen wrote:
		There you have it, mIke- I've just roasted three small
batches of the Sumatra M from a sample pack I got almost a year ago. It
absolutely floored me with the whole new symphony of flavor and aroma this
bean has, and yes, "Sumatra [indeed] adds some very unique bass notes." 
		
		I could not believe the blast of deep flavor in every fresh
mouthful. It's official- I love bass! Of course, I knew that over 40 years
ago when I first heard the sound of the Brobdingnagian pipe organ in the
Atlantic City Convention Hall auditorium.
		
		Like the Sumatra, it has some huge bass notes. There are
some 16 foot pipes of such a massive scale that you could set a microwave
oven in the mouth of the pipe. And 32 footers, and 64's. It's enormous, with
the blowers totaling 600 horsepower. It can be staggering, with some ranks
on 50, and even 100" of wind.
		
		It would be mind-numbing to listen to a Bach concert on that
instrument while sipping a huge Sumatra. The imagination runs wild.
		
		Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
		
		I never learned from a man who agreed with me. 
		Robert A. Heinlein


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