HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Turkey smoke thoughts (3 msgs / 136 lines)
1) From: Mike Chester
miKe,
I have found that apple wood smoke goes very well with poultry.  Cherry goes 
well also, but it imparts more red or pink color to the meat which causes 
the uninformed to think that it is undercooked.  Are you only using the 
cooking pellets for the smoke flavor or do you add a packet of flavor 
pellets for more smoke flavor?  When I had my Traeger, I used to make a foil 
packet of pure flavor wood pellets and lay it on top of the heat deflector 
over the fire pot.  This would add a bit more smoke flavor than just the 
cooking pellets alone.  I would sometimes mix 2 or more flavors in this 
packet or use one flavor in the packet and another in the hopper.
Your cider brine recipe sounds good.  I usually use this basic brine recipe: 
To one gallon of water I add 7 oz of non-iodized salt and 8 oz of sugar both 
measured by weight, not volume.  I start with 1/2 gal of water, add the salt 
and sugar and add bay leaf, thyme, parsley stems and peppercorns and bring 
to a boil.  Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 - 20 minutes.  I put it 
into the brining bucket and add 1/2 gallon of ice water to quickly get the 
solution below room temperature. For chicken, I brine overnight, for turkey 
about 1.5 days in the refrigerator.  I remove from the brine and let the 
birds dry on a rack in the fridge for at least one hour.  This causes a 
pellicle to form on the skin which makes the smoke stick better.  I don't 
oil the skin as that makes a barrier to the smoke.
Hope that this helps.
Another Mike

2) From: tom ulmer
That's a lot of flavor in the brine. Ginger, bay, and clove... interesting
combination.
I'm thinking a peach wood smoke would add a little extra.
Have you ever tried flavor injection before brining? It disperses nicely in
the brine.

3) From: Terry Stockdale
At 08:19 AM 11/10/2005, Mike McKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
I smoke turkey and pork with pecan _shells_.  It's a great use for 
the leftovers, even from 3 or 4 pounds of pecans.  I use a 
double-burner gas grill.  Turkey goes at one end, with the fire and 
shells at the other end.  The shells are in a pair of aluminum foil 
pie pans, for air flow control.
I learned this trick from a little farm outside Houston (Froberg 
Farm, near Alvin) which grows and sells its vegetables in its own 
market.  Originally, they sold under their huge, spreading live oak 
tree (limbs reaching out, touching the ground and curling back up 
again), with about 10 picnic tables to support their produce.  The 
farm's got big enough that they built a building and started buying 
produce and pecans to add to their own crop.  I _think_ they still do 
some things like blackberries as "pick your own."
Anyway, we were there one day and they had bushel bags of pecan 
shells by the door.  The sign said "Great for smoking and 
mulch.  $1".  Well, I knew I didn't want to step on those suckers 
with my bare feet.  And, I didn't see how you could roll pecan shells 
in such fragile paper, so I tried using them for smoking foods in my 
gas grill.  Wow!
This year will probably be my first Thanksgiving or Christmas without 
pecan-shell-smoked turkey, thanks to Katrina and Rita.  Oh, well, I 
started frying turkeys a couple years ago, so I'll probably end up 
with fried turkey for Thanksgiving.
Anyway, if you can find pecan shells, they will be a whole lot 
cheaper than pecan wood.  One of our local pecan factories actually 
gave pecan shells away a few years ago.  Now, they pre-sell their 
entire output of shells.
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My coffee pages:http://www.TerryStockdale.com/coffeeMy newsletter and tips:  http://www.TerrysComputerTips.com


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