HomeRoast Digest


Topic: air popper raost times - was Re: +air popper vs. freshroast (30 msgs / 1028 lines)
1) From: Coffee Dork
Frank Fairchild wrote:
<Snip>
I'd like to hijack this subject to ask about air poppers in general -
since Frank mentioned roast times and profiling in air poppers. I am new
to roasting and did my first couple batches inside or while the weather
was warm. Now I'm in the garage and it is much colder (like ~40) and my
roast times are longer. Initially I was concerned as it seemed too long
- 10-12 minutes v. 5-6. But the roasts come out well and the coffee is
great.
So what are some close to ideal times for average roast profiles in an
air popper? What should the targets be for initial 1st, how long a 1st,
time between 1st and 2nd, etc. etc.
Obviously these times are averages and vary depending on the variety of
coffee. I was just looking for a good place to begin. And mostly wanted
to see if the temp in my garage is slowing the roast down too much.
-- 
JF
Junior Roaster
Brewmaster

2) From: Frank Fairchild
I can only speak for myself (three months experience) in replying to this 
but I personally would like to shoot for 15-16 minute roast times and see 
what happens but you can't do this with a popper or Fresh Roast without 
modifications or using a $100.00 variac.  As I mentioned, I am roasting in a 
38 degree garage which slowed my roasting times significantly but the flavor 
of the coffees I have roasted has improved over the quicker roast times I 
was getting in warmer weather.  This along with profiling is why I am going 
to try the SC/TO setup.
Frank

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
I am far from expert but will share what I have gathered from listmembers
regarding slowing down the roast in a popper:
* use a long small-guage extension cord. If the cord is small and wimpy, it
will slow down the roast. The longer the cord, the more it will slow down
the roast.
* roast smaller batches. In general the larger the batch, the faster the
roast; the smaller the batch, the longer the roast
* tilt the popper about 30 degrees. My understanding is that tilting the
popper works because it allows some of the heat to blow right past the
beans.
Brian
On 12/5/05, Frank Fairchild  wrote:
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4) From: mIke mcKoffee
There used to be a lot of air roasting profile discussions but it seems only
a couple of us still active on the List profile air roasts anymore, myself
and Mike (just plain) I've gone as short as 5min (emulating a FR) and as
long as 21 min (playing with a very light American roast of a Panama a
couple years ago) For "coffee" brewing I usually roast in the 10 to 13 min
range depending on bean (any brewing method including Americano), for
espresso shots 14 to 16 min. Note: espresso roasting does not equal dark for
me, usually FC FC+ range max. If a wild really bright Kenya I'll roast it a
slower espresso profile even for coffee to tame it's acidity for better
balance. And if the Kenya is targeted for espresso even slower 17-18min!
(Les proved at a PNW Gathering a wild bright Kenya can be tamed quite nicely
shots)
People have posted numerous links with information for controlling various
air roasters and poppers. Most linked for Ed's site:http://www.homeroaster.com/miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net 
<Snip>

5) From: Philip Keleshian
Hi Mike,
I profile my roasts.  Now I guess that you can't properly call a Z&D an =
air roaster, but I also have an HWP which is most definately an air =
roaster. I do on occasion still use the HWP and I profile my roasts with =
it. It is modified to take a thermocouple probe into the bean mass and =
the temperature is controllable.
Phil

6) From: Michael Dhabolt
JF
I roast with a modified Poppery (1),  My machine is a little "over the top"=
,
I can control fan speed from nothing to about 135% of un-modified speed,
and I use a PID for heat control.  I roasted with a variac for heat control
for quite a while before being won over by the ease of the PID, and accurat=
e
profile ability it allows.
Some people use the "tilt" to help with heat control of poppers, it is
frequently used as a method of increasing the green bean load of a popper
(the high side of the bean load is shallower and therefor starts to
circulate easier - with the same air pressure).  The tilt technique is
especially useful if you have speed control of the fan.  My normal (not
maximum) load is 260 gm of green beans.
The question was originally concerning times to first and second -
profiles.  My profiles change somewhat with different beans, but it has bee=
n
a long time since I've ended a roast in less than 13 minutes - and I
frequently go to 16 minutes.  I roast out side of these numbers for unusual
beans, but, for me, these times cover 85% of my roasts.  1st crack a little
one way or the other from 10-11 minutes, and if I'm going to the first hint
of 2nd crack (outliers) it is commonly 4-5 minutes after 1st.
As you have noticed - I'm being vague about exact numbers.  The PID and fan
control gives a person enough flexibility to do anything that seems like it
might prove to be a "better" roast, or teach me something new.  A casual
perusal of my roasting log doesn't come up with anything more concrete than
the previous information.
Mike (just plain) - variacs for everyone

7) From: Les
Mike,
You make an excellent point here.  There is a science and an art to
roasting.  The science side is what gives good repeatability  and control o=
f
the variables.  The art is manipulating those variables in such a way as to
maximize the roast for a particular bean.
Les
On 12/5/05, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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8) From: Douglas Strait
Like "Just Plain" Mike I'm using a modified air popper that allows any 
profile I wish. I find that my typical brewing roast times are 
typically in the range of 10-13 minutes similar to Mike McKoffee. A 
typical profile for me would be to ramp quickly to 290F probed bean 
mass temperature and hold for 4 minute total elapsed time, then ramp 
to 1st crack between 6-7 minutes, slow ramp to finish in 10-13 minutes 
which for many roasts is at the verge of 2nd crack. I don't do 
espresso so I have nothing to add there.
Doug

9) From: Michael Dhabolt
Thanks Doug,
I wasn't sure about the amount of specificity appropriate.
JF,
Here is another starting profile (underlined starting) for air roasting tha=
t
has worked well for espresso (for me).  I use this frequently for beans tha=
t
exhibit beginning of 1st crack at 390 to 400 degrees F.  The third ramp (30
degrees per minute) is getting close to the thermal limits of my machine
unless I slow the fan.  The beans are light enough by the third ramp that
slowing the fan works well for me - I adjust for just enough air flow to
keep the beans circulating through the roast, not to 'loft' them.
First ramp       - 2 minutes to - 230 degrees F
Second ramp   - 2 minutes to - 270 degrees F
Third ramp       - 4 minutes to - 390 degrees F
Fourth ramp     - 2 minutes to - 425 degrees F
Fifth ramp        - 4 minutes to - 445 degrees F
With my equipment, the fourth ramp will 'romp' quickly through 1st crack.  =
I
am at the beginning of 2nd crack, and stopping the roast, prior to reaching
the end of the fifth ramp.  If your temperature indication give you
different numbers for 1st crack, you can try shifting all the ramps up or
down to fit your equipment.
Mike (just plain)

10) From: Les
Mike,
You might try reversing number 4 and 5 on your profile.  Go straight to 445
and finish off at 425.  A reverse ramp to finish off a roast seems to make
it much sweeter in my RK.  I would like to hear how it works in your fluid
bed
Roaster.
On 12/5/05, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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11) From: Michael Dhabolt
Les,
How do you do it?  After 1st is through, take it quickly to a hint of 2nd,
or the normal stretch to 2nd, before dropping back to the lower temp for
several minutes?
Sounds cool;^)
Mike (just plain)
On 12/5/05, Les  wrote:
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beans
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chine
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12) From: mIke mcKoffee
Be interesting to try for the sake of roasting science, but remember you're
somewhat comparing apples or oranges. IIRC Les is backing off RK drum
roaster grill dome temp, not actually measuring bean mass temp. In a sense I
do that already, and I believe Mike (just plain) you do to. After first
during the finish stage I'll almost always back off heater temp, sometimes
as much as 20v, but never take the actual bean temp backwards. You have to
back off the heater because the beans are going exothermic else the roast
will very rapidly fly to and through 2nd.
You'd likely benefit most from picking a bean you both have, both roast same
day and exchange part of the batches with each other. In the past some of
us, as many as 5 at once, all roasted and exchanged roasts of the same bean
all roasting with different methods. Quite fun and educational.
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Dhabolt
	Sent: Monday, December 05, 2005 10:00 PM
	
	Les,
	 
	How do you do it?  After 1st is through, take it quickly to a hint
of 2nd, or the normal stretch to 2nd, before dropping back to the lower temp
for several minutes?
	 
	Sounds cool;^)
	 
	Mike (just plain)
	
	On 12/5/05, Les  wrote: 
		Mike,
		You might try reversing number 4 and 5 on your profile.  Go
straight to 445 and finish off at 425.  A reverse ramp to finish off a roast
seems to make it much sweeter in my RK.  I would like to hear how it works
in your fluid bed 
		Roaster.
		On 12/5/05, Michael Dhabolt < michael.dhabolt
 > wrote: 
		
			Thanks Doug,
			 
			I wasn't sure about the amount of specificity
appropriate.
			 
			JF,
			 
			Here is another starting profile (underlined
starting) for air roasting that has worked well for espresso (for me).  I
use this frequently for beans that exhibit beginning of 1st crack at 390 to
400 degrees F.  The third ramp (30 degrees per minute) is getting close to
the thermal limits of my machine unless I slow the fan.  The beans are light
enough by the third ramp that slowing the fan works well for me - I adjust
for just enough air flow to keep the beans circulating through the roast,
not to 'loft' them. 
			 
			First ramp       - 2 minutes to - 230 degrees F
			Second ramp   - 2 minutes to - 270 degrees F
			Third ramp       - 4 minutes to - 390 degrees F
			Fourth ramp     - 2 minutes to - 425 degrees F
			Fifth ramp        - 4 minutes to - 445 degrees F 
			 
			With my equipment, the fourth ramp will 'romp'
quickly through 1st crack.  I am at the beginning of 2nd crack, and stopping
the roast, prior to reaching the end of the fifth ramp.  If your temperature
indication give you different numbers for 1st crack, you can try shifting
all the ramps up or down to fit your equipment. 
			 
			Mike (just plain)

13) From: Michael Dhabolt
miKe
<Snip>
you're
somewhat comparing apples or oranges<<
I agree but - If Les is backing off 20 degrees or so after second starts -
he has my interest picqued.  My EOR is normally (depending on the bean) - I
should say commonly - at the first hint of second.  I usually kick the heat
off and the fan to high - I'm back under 250 in about a minute.
Les really likes a sweet pull, and I'm always up to learn something new.
BTW did you get a picture of Tom's Mazzer Modification?
Mike (just plain)

14) From: mIke mcKoffee
Mike, you haven't played with holding the final bean temp by backing off
heat? Not backing way off and cooling but holding bean final temp steady. I
thought you had. I believe that's what Les is actually doing. (and I what I
observed Stumptown doing on their espresso roasts IIRC) 20 degree dome temp
reduction when beans going exo really isn't that much! I usually hold the
final bean temp 15 to 30 seconds before kicking off the heater for cooling.
That's what I was talking about heater voltage down as much as 20v or even
more (depending on ambient) end of roast. It's kind of weird going along
final end ramp after 1st into tickling 2nd 10f per minute ramp rate with
heater voltage 120 to 130v then chopping it sometimes even below 100v to
hold. Wouldn't be hard I don't think with your PID setup but manual takes a
bit of practice. 
miKe
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Dhabolt
	Sent: Monday, December 05, 2005 11:19 PM
	To: homeroast
	Subject: Re: air popper raost times - was Re: +air popper vs.
freshroast
	
	miKe
	 
	>>Be interesting to try for the sake of roasting science, but
remember you're
	somewhat comparing apples or oranges<<
	 
	I agree but - If Les is backing off 20 degrees or so after second
starts - he has my interest picqued.  My EOR is normally (depending on the
bean) - I should say commonly - at the first hint of second.  I usually kick
the heat off and the fan to high - I'm back under 250 in about a minute. 
	 
	Les really likes a sweet pull, and I'm always up to learn something
new.
	 
	BTW did you get a picture of Tom's Mazzer Modification?
	 
	Mike (just plain)

15) From: Michael Dhabolt
miKe
I've never tried it.  The last to know - the story of my life.  Now that yo=
u
mention it, I remember watching them do it at Stumptown.  It just never
connected until now.
I love it when I learn something new.  Taking manual control of the roaster
is doable, I'll roast a half dozen test roasts tonight and play. The only
tough part will be waiting out the resting period.  Sounds like a bean that
I enjoy as a SO espresso is called for.  I just happen to have three pounds
of the pacamaral left.
Mike (just plain, old, wrinkled and still learning)

16) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
It is important to remember that the oven or grill dome temp may have little
relation to the actual bean temp. My electric oven drum roaster was giving
me fits. Just when I had everything figured out using the oven temp,
something unknown would happen and the roast would be too light or too dark.
Then I bit the bullet and modded the drum so that a thermocouple could be
inserted into the bean mass. Now I observe the bean temp only, and can know
precisely when to correct the temp to follow a desired profile.
<Snip>
When you know the bean temp and the response of your heater, you are always
in control of the roast. I try to keep the bean temp always rising because
it is easier to do in a non-perf drum where the heat transfer to the beans
is less efficient than an air roaster.
My best air popper profiles were 3 minutes or less. It was pedal to the
metal using a fixed time from the first pop of first crack to end of roast.
My controlled air popper profiles of 5 to 20 minutes were nearly always less
flavorful. But now my drum roast profiles are normally 15 to 25 minutes and
the quality of flavor far surpasses any of my popper roasts. I should point
out that the profile time spent at temps less than about 150 C is less
important than the time where the roast reactions are taking place, so total
profile time can be misleading.
I use the 300 F or 150 C point to reduce heat from maximum at startup. At
170 C I begin ramp control starting at about 10 to 15 C per minute, aiming
for a linear 4 to 6 C ramp from 200 C to the finish. This linear ramp is in
place before first crack which I believe is important to developing my
preferred flavors.
For the newbies, measuring the actual bean temp in a hot air roaster is
difficult due to the sensor "seeing" mostly the flowing hot air. Most drum
roasters have very little flowing air within the bed of beans.
--

17) From: Les
I sure like being a part of a group that is this smart!  Mike McKoffee has
me figured out.  My thought was to go to 445 from 390 and ramp down to 425
to hold the temp after 1st crack.  I have found that by stretching the roas=
t
out after 1st crack I get better carmalization and a more complex cup
without bitterness.  In my RK setup I can hold off  2nd crack almost
indefinitely by bringing my temperature down to 440 degrees.  My best guess
is my bean temp is about 20 degrees lower, thus I would guess my bean temp
is around 425.  When I want to go a few cracks into second, I just raise my
temp to 460 and second starts.  I picked this  trick up at Stumptown.  The
roaster there really stretched the roast out that we observed.  If I
remember right it was between 10 and 15 minutes!
Les
On 12/6/05, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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18) From: mIke mcKoffee
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Ken, I've always found your air roast results preference interesting and
such a seeming anomaly. Not right or wrong of course, just fascinatintly
incongruous with what most other's report. Even more interesting is you
prefer your drum results over any of your air roast methods!  
Totally agree directly following a drum roaster profile with an air roaster
doesn't work because of differing heat transfer to beans. This has been
(possibly) proven by copious tests and roast exchanges over the years by the
likes of Jim Schulman and others. Those same experiments did lead to believe
that modified air roast profiles emulating a drum profile (basically
somewhat faster than the corresponding drum profile) did produce very
similar results. OTH with such a complex chemical entity as the coffee bean
and such almost impossible variables to precisely control in any roast
method nothing is set in stone!
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net

19) From: Michael Dhabolt
Les,
I sure hate being the "slow" guy in a >>group that is this smart!<<.  Like =
I
told miKe I watched them do the 'real slow to second' at Stumptown along
with everyone else.  I guess I was enthralled with the "Mistral" and the
shots they were pulling with it.  Disadvantage of being a hardware geek.
How long have you been 'holding' between 1st and 2nd?  And, have you been
pulling back from the onset of 2nd, or going immediately to cooling.
Mike (just plain)
On 12/6/05, Les  wrote:
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20) From: Les
Mike,
I don't hold back at the end, I just finish the roast.    A lot of my roast=
s
are done 15 seconds into second crack.  That would be about 3 - 5 seconds o=
n
a fluid bed.  Even those that I don't take into second, I finish with the
heat rising and then cool rapidly.  Cooling rapidly is one of the most
important aspects of getting a good roast, and we don't talk about it much.
One question that needs more exploring is, "Can a roast be cooled too
fast?"  This is a serious consideration, so apart from some coffee humor
that I expect to hit the list, has anyone done any serious research?  I kno=
w
Alchemist at PNWG II served up some "room temperature cooled" coffee and it
was Yuk!
Les
On 12/6/05, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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21) From: Peter Zulkowski
Sometime last year we had a discussion about cooling time, and although 
I do not know the figures, there was some feeling that the roast can be 
cooled too fast. (or too slowly)
This could vary with different beans I suppose, and you could probably 
build a case / profile for what temperature to hold at given times, ramp 
times for cooling,  etc. Reactions are taking place during cooling, 
similar to the roasting process. Seems like once you get down below a 
certain temp then the reactions stop, but I bet we could do some 
experiments to see how cooling affects the outcome.
PeterZ
Happy with cooling in about 2 minutes to 160F, here in LHC
Les wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Michael Dhabolt
Les,
I haven't done any serious research on cooling.  Way back when - I didn't
have anything setup to rapidly cool with, so I was doing the back and forth
between two colanders thing.  I noticed a definate positive change in taste
when I progressed to using cooling accoutrements.  That, plus the anecdotal
"faster is better" general consensus of opinion has driven my procedure
since.  I wouldn't be surprised if there is something to be learned here - =
I
think I'll leave that research to someone with a more sensitive palette tha=
n
mine.
You didn't mention how long you have been 'stretching' between 1st and 2nd?=
?
Mike (just plain)
On 12/6/05, Les  wrote:
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23) From: Scott Koue
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I will put in a note of caution here.  You are over amping that 
extension cord.  If it's not getting too hot your probably OK BUT heat =
breaks down the insulation so be careful, it's a good way to start a 
fire.
SK
On Dec 5, 2005, at 3:34 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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I am 
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I will put in a note of caution here.  You are over amping that
extension cord.  If it's not getting too hot your probably OK BUT heat
breaks down the insulation so be careful, it's a good way to start a
fire.
SK
On Dec 5, 2005, at 3:34 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
I am far from expert but will share what I have gathered from
listmembers regarding slowing down the roast in a popper:
 
* use a long small-guage extension cord. If the cord is small and
wimpy, it will slow down the roast. The longer the cord, the more it
will slow down the roast.
 
* roast smaller batches. In general the larger the batch, the faster
the roast; the smaller the batch, the longer the roast
 
* tilt the popper about 30 degrees. My understanding is that tilting
the popper works because it allows some of the heat to blow right past
the beans.
 
Brian
 
On 12/5/05, Frank Fairchild
<<0000,0000,EEEEfrank>
wrote: I can only speak for myself (three months experience) in
replying to this
but I personally would like to shoot for 15-16 minute roast
times and see
what happens but you can't do this with a popper or Fresh Roast without
modifications or using a $100.00 variac.  As I mentioned, I am
roasting in a
38 degree garage which slowed my roasting times significantly but the
flavor 
of the coffees I have roasted has improved over the quicker roast
times I
was getting in warmer weather.  This along with profiling is why I =
am
going
to try the SC/TO setup.
Frank

24) From: Brian Kamnetz
Scott,
Thanks for the note of caution regarding the extenstion cord. Seems like
I've heard that the cord is more apt to get hot if it is coiled.
Brian
On 12/6/05, Scott Koue  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Rick Copple
Les wrote:
<Snip>
Interesting. I've at times extended the trip to second in my wok. Lately 
I've been speeding up to first crack and it seems to bring out the bean 
flavors more. My normal trip to first crack in the wok was 15 minutes, 
and by 20 minutes or just there after I would end up going into second 
crack. Part of that was after pre-heating I would drop the temp down to 
"3.5" on the electric stove, then around 8 min. raise it to 4, then 
around 12 turn it to 4.5, and then around 15 turn it to 5.
Today I dropped the temp down to 4.75 and I was entering first crack 
right around 10 minutes. When it seemed first crack was beginning to 
wind down, I dropped it down to 4 and let it ride into second, which 
began happening around 17 minutes, and it was shortly there that I 
stopped it.
The Kenya I roasted to a FC+ really came out with some great flavors, 
and that was with no rest on it. Can't wait to see what a rest will add 
to it, and I'm going to check this out in the espresso cup too. It is so 
good and sweet in the press pot cup I've been sipping on it should be 
great in the espresso cup.
 >  Cooling rapidly is one of the most
<Snip>
That is actually something that I've been intending to look more into. 
My usual method is to dump the beans in a colander. I then take a 
mattress air blower, electric, which puts out a decent amount of air, 
and point it at the colander while I stir and shower the beans off the 
spoon. This seems to take around 4 minutes to cool the beans. I've been 
wanting to look into a better and faster way to cool them, with 
hopefully less work!
While my popper roast cooled pretty fast this way, tossing the beans up 
in the air with the colander while blowing them with the blower, the 
full pound takes a little longer. As a matter of fact, the temp here is 
down around 44 degrees, and I cooled the beans this way outside. With 
the cooler weather, I'm sure the beans cooled faster...so that might 
have added to the really great flavor of these beans as well.
If I get enough Christmas money, I may just have to get the materials to 
build that cooling rack that fits on a box fan. After all, I have to 
plan for the day when I get an RK drum and need to cool 4 pounds of 
beans down at once! :-)
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

26) From: Michael Dhabolt
Rick,
This setup won't do 4 pounds, but until you need to cool more than a pound
at a time -- -- this: http://tinyurl.com/d7q8v*=
*
*works quite nicely for me.  There is a good chance you got one of these
rings with your wok - if not they are used under a wok on a flat top range.
The colander you already have, and the fan is a K-Mart special - Honeywell
Tornado - $9.99.  I cool in the P1 until below 300 and then dump into this
rig - takes it to ambient in about a minute (one half pound load).
I'd like to take credit - but it wasn't my idea (the wok stand part was), I
saw it on a thread on coffee geek - can't remember who posted it.
Mike (just plain)

27) From: Alchemist John
Seems we are all discovering/articulating this recently.  To a large 
degree, it is having full control of your roaster and its heat 
output.  Virtually all good roasting curves I have seen are a 2nd 
order curve, being nearly horizontal when it reaches EOR.  It mostly 
has to do with the heat differential between the beans and roaster 
environment.   What Les is describing is a very low delta T, just shy 
of staling (staling being 0 delta T).  In this delicate equilibrium, 
and high temperature, every increase in chamber temp quickly causes 
the beans to follow.  It is how I have literally tip toed into 2nd 
crack, and sat there for 2 minutes and NOT had a FC+ roast.  Solid 
FC, but that is it.  And SOOOOO sweet as Les would say.  And ditto on 
Stumptown - I saw them sit in 2nd for what seemed like a long time, 
but the beans were no where even approaching over roasted - simply 
perfectly roasted.
I don't think you can reliably get that by hitting 2nd while there is 
a large delta T.  The outside it too dark, the inside is "correct" 
since where there is a delta T with chamber and "bean", on a fast 
ramp, it would seem there is a delta T for the inside and outside of 
the bean.  Tip toeing into your EOR brings that intra bean delta to 
nearly 0.  At least the is my guess.
At 09:35 12/6/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

28) From: Alchemist John
Well, that was an extreme.  I pulled the roast and put it straight 
into a mason jar and sealed it.  It was foul though...
At 12:53 12/6/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

29) From: J.W.Bullfrog
John is exactly right here. I always turn down the power to the coil at 
1st crack because that extra energy into the system would cause the 
temperature to continue to rise faster than desired.
You could increase the fan speed to control the temp, but then you get 
to much movement in the fluid bed (IMHO).
Ben
Alchemist John wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

30) From: Rick Copple
Michael Dhabolt wrote:
<Snip>
Looks cool. Nice idea.
<Snip>
Nope, don't have one. I don't have a flat top either, so never bothered 
to find one. Mine just sits right on the electric burner, but it is 
thick enough wok that it does a good job distributing the heat anyway. 
For a wok roast, my roast come out looking very uniform...within reason. :-)
But I would have to buy everything there (my colander is solid metal 
with holes in it, not mesh). I'll keep it in mind though. Thanks for the 
idea.
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX


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