HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A home roaster returns to the fold (9 msgs / 265 lines)
1) From: Sherry Morrison
I just re-joined this great list and already have many questions about 
home roasting. i took a long hiatus from coffee roasting and would like 
to get back to it now that my life has settled down a bit and I have 
some free time to things I like, such as roasting coffee. I have an 
older Cafe Rosto I picked up several years ago . I have dusted it off 
and pressed it back into service.  I prefer the HW outside in the 
garage as my kids DH do not like the smell of roasted coffee permeating 
the house, Imagine that!
I see there have been some changes during my roasting absence. For one, 
I notice a greater choice of roasters to chose from now. That means the 
home coffee roasting experience is growing which is something I am 
excited about.
My first foray back into roasting yielded under roasted beans that 
smelled and tasted like green hay. It took at least 20 minutes to roast 
the batch. It was very cold outside when I roasted. I remembered using 
a box to enclose the roaster when it was winter, so I will try that 
next in an effort to speed the roast time up.
OK, now for my questions:
1--I have been reading about variacs. I understand it can be used to 
regulate the voltage supplied to electric appliances. Is this something 
that would be helpful for my coffee roasting?
2--I have been on ebay an saw a rotisserie coffee roasting attatchment 
for the outdoor grill. Has anyone used this and what are the pros and 
cons of roasting coffee with it?
Sherry--whose first few roasts were under roasted and tasted like green 
hay

2) From: Sherry Morrison
I just re-joined this great list and already have many questions about 
home roasting. i took a long hiatus from coffee roasting and would like 
to get back to it now that my life has settled down a bit and I have 
some free time to things I like, such as roasting coffee. I have an 
older Cafe Rosto I picked up several years ago . I have dusted it off 
and pressed it back into service.  I prefer the HW outside in the 
garage as my kids DH do not like the smell of roasted coffee permeating 
the house, Imagine that!
I see there have been some changes during my roasting absence. For one, 
I notice a greater choice of roasters to chose from now. That means the 
home coffee roasting experience is growing which is something I am 
excited about.
My first foray back into roasting yielded under roasted beans that 
smelled and tasted like green hay. It took at least 20 minutes to roast 
the batch. It was very cold outside when I roasted. I remembered using 
a box to enclose the roaster when it was winter, so I will try that 
next in an effort to speed the roast time up.
OK, now for my questions:
1--I have been reading about variacs. I understand it can be used to 
regulate the voltage supplied to electric appliances. Is this something 
that would be helpful for my coffee roasting?
2--I have been on ebay an saw a rotisserie coffee roasting attatchment 
for the outdoor grill. Has anyone used this and what are the pros and 
cons of roasting coffee with it?
Sherry--whose first few roasts were under roasted and tasted like green 
hay

3) From: Sherry Morrison
I just re-joined this great list and already have many questions about 
home roasting. i took a long hiatus from coffee roasting and would like 
to get back to it now that my life has settled down a bit and I have 
some free time to things I like, such as roasting coffee. I have an 
older Cafe Rosto I picked up several years ago . I have dusted it off 
and pressed it back into service.  I prefer the HW outside in the 
garage as my kids DH do not like the smell of roasted coffee permeating 
the house, Imagine that!
I see there have been some changes during my roasting absence. For one, 
I notice a greater choice of roasters to chose from now. That means the 
home coffee roasting experience is growing which is something I am 
excited about.
My first foray back into roasting yielded under roasted beans that 
smelled and tasted like green hay. It took at least 20 minutes to roast 
the batch. It was very cold outside when I roasted. I remembered using 
a box to enclose the roaster when it was winter, so I will try that 
next in an effort to speed the roast time up.
OK, now for my questions:
1--I have been reading about variacs. I understand it can be used to 
regulate the voltage supplied to electric appliances. Is this something 
that would be helpful for my coffee roasting?
2--I have been on ebay an saw a rotisserie coffee roasting attatchment 
for the outdoor grill. Has anyone used this and what are the pros and 
cons of roasting coffee with it?
Sherry--whose first few roasts were under roasted and tasted like green 
hay

4) From: Alchemist John
Welcome back.  A variac is helpful for regulating voltage, and great 
if you DYI roaster, but I don't think it will help your situation if 
the long roast time is due to cold temps.  BTW, there is a 20amp 
variac on ebay right now.
I have seen the rotisserie attachment on ebay, and where as it might 
work, it looks kind of ....cheesy.  I like RK drums much more.
At 07:20 12/27/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

5) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Sherry,
Here is a background on dyi hot air poppers.http://www.homeroaster.com/geekmod.htmlBen
Sherry Morrison wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

6) From: mIke mcKoffee
Actually a variac that has the ability to boost not just attenuate voltage
does help compensate for lower ambient temperature with the Caffe Rosto.
Same as increasing heat output on any cooking device depending ambient. It
works better if heater and fan voltage input split so not also increasing
fan speed which acts to counter the increased heater output though even if
Rosto stock increasing voltage to both heater and fan results in net gain.
However, the free cardboard box method does also work quite well. Best
results in freezing temps is combination of both! 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net 
 
<Snip>

7) From:
Hi Sherry:
Welcome back. You green hay beans, how old were they? If it is really cold you will need to roast longer for sure.
I cannot say much about a grill attachmant from eBay since I use the RK drum for that...
As far as the varaics go, I would check your line voltage and if you continually have 119/122 I would not worry or spend the money for a varaic. Maybe put that into and RK drum instead. Keeping some sort of box/shield around the roaster will make up for any cold/wind issues I would think.
I don't really think that an extra 5 or 10 minutes here or there makes a bad roast anyway. It still all boils down to a matter of taste and if you can roast by site a bit shoot for a city, city+ or full and you will have a great cup.
again, welcome back,
ginny
<Snip>

8) From: Terry Stockdale
I'll add to what Mike said:  I used a variac to boost the voltage 
with my Hottop.  I hooked up a 3-plug adapter, with a digital 
voltmeter hooked to one port and the variac hooked to the other.  My 
resulting control of the voltage made my Hottop roast must more predictable.
It really helped in the summer time, when I typically saw a 5v drop 
between morning and evening line voltages.  Using the variac+digital 
voltmeter setup, I would bump the voltage up to 120v when the heaters 
kicked in and drop the voltage down to 120 when the heaters kicked out.
Mike noted that variacs can boost the voltage, not just reduce 
it.  That really depends on the indivitual unit.  Mine would do 
+110%;  however, some others max at 100% of the input voltage -- they 
can't increase the voltage.  get one that does both.
Regarding "regulating the voltage" --- the only regulation of voltage 
is manual for the ~$100 models.  These are variable transformers -- 
all we're doing is changing where the connections are on the 
transformer's coils.  Voltage regulation, as in stabilization, is an 
entirely different product at a hugely different price, when we're 
talking 1400 watts load.
Terry
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My Coffee Pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages: http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrumAt 10:44 AM 12/27/2005, mike mcKoffee wrote:">http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffeeMy Hottop pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages: http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrumAt 10:44 AM 12/27/2005, mike mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
--

9) From: Alchemist John
Well, that as you say is a matter of taste.  5 or 10 minutes may not 
ruin a roast if you are talking about the difference in a 5 minute 
roast and a 15 minute roast, but the difference in 15 and 25 can be 
sizable.  As Tom has said, roasting beans is NOT just about making 
them turn brown.  I can say I have never tasted a 30 minute roast I 
found enjoyable.
It is nice you are encouraging Ginny, but it is a little misplaced here IMO.
At 10:09 12/27/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/


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