HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New RK Drum (43 msgs / 1111 lines)
1) From: Jeff Braman
After roasting several years with the "HotTop", decided that I really
need to have more roasting capability and also perhaps better control
of profile, ordered an RK drum and motor! I have perused  Ron's
website and am anxiously awaiting delivery.
I knew that some of you roast with this drum an hoping that you might
share any profiles or "tricks" that you might use? (Plan on starting
with and probably roasting 1 to 2 lbs. at a time)
Thanks in advance.
jeffb

2) From: Les
Jeff,
I have posted profiles on Ron's site.
Les
On 1/1/06, Jeff Braman  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: R.N.Kyle
Jeff go here for drum profiles, and to be honest I think Les is the pro =
with
the RK Drumhttp://www.rkdrums.com/drumprofiles.htmMaybe its the 20+ yrs of roasting experience, but I really think its the =
man
in front of the grill.
RK

4) From: David Echelbarger
I think so very much depends on the type of grill you have.  It took me many
roasts to develop my profile and I learned a great deal about coffee in the
process.  Essentially, I need a slow steady ramp to a 1st crack between 10
and 11 minutes.    If I apply too much heat early I get grassy coffee.  Too
slow, baked.  Just don't be discouraged and keep track of everything,
absolutely everything and once you get to the promised land -- you are
there!

5) From: Terry Stockdale
At 07:31 PM 1/1/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
Jeff,
I've got some of my experiences chronicled on my RK Drum pages.
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My Coffee Pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages: http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrum ">http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffeeMy Hottop pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages: http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrum 

6) From: Geary Lyons
My search for "larger quantity, more control" has ended.  The smallish
popper batches were getting bothersome. I tried HG/DB, but the gun I had did
not move enough air and my roasts were flat.  But, the quantity was nice.
Given the investment in a  better gun, this would be a great method.  But I
went for the RK drum.
It arrived today.  I quickly cleaned, prepped and rushed to the gas grill to
"burn" some UGH!  My old Charbroil 3 RPM motor is pretty clunky, but I
couldn't wait. I did order Ron's motor, but it is not ready to ship. I
roasted 4 test batches of 150 gr. each; Ethiopian Harrar FC+, Java Estate
Prince FC+, Guatemala Huehuetanango FC+ and SM Donkey V.  I wanted the
Harrar at FC, but just wasn't quick enough getting the drum off and emptied!
Practice! Practice!
I am very happy with the roast control. I was worried that I wouldn't be
able to hear the cracks. Not a problem!! Now to let the coffee rest &
taste!! My stash has been diminished by the simple capacity of the drum!!
The drum is a work of industrial art!  It is truly a pleasure to use!
Cheers,
Geary

7) From: Jerry Procopio
Geary,
Welcome to the world of RK Drum roasting.  If you don't have them 
already, I'd suggest a pair of welders gloves.  They's thick enough to 
keep you from getting burned, and thin enough so you can push/pull that 
cotter pin out by hand instead of trying to mess around with pliers.
Wait till you see Ron's motor setup in person.  Great craftsmanship. 
You'll really be pleased.
Jerry
Geary Lyons wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Wesley Simon
Geary,
I recently recieved and setup my drum.  I also purchased the faster motor.
The only piece I'm missing is a 16" diameter sifter for cooling.  I put one
on order from a local restaurant supply place.  I have a small collander, s=
o
my batch sizes have been only a pound at a time.  "Only a pound!"  HA!  Eve=
n
at a pound, it's so much nicer than my old popper method.
Last night, I roasted a pound of Rwandan and a pound of Kona.
I'm having trouble differentiating between the first and second crack.  In
Les' roast profile, it talks about 2-3 minutes between first and second.  I
turn my grill all the way down at the first pop of the first crack.  I'm
hitting first crack somewhere around 9-10 minutes rather than 8-9.  Perhaps
I should bump up the temperature a little.  My cheap char-broil thermometer
says that I'm near 600 degrees, but I don't believe it.  It couldn't reach
first crack when it read 470-500 degrees.  Anyway, it seems like first and
second crack run together.  I'm not sure at this point.  I was able to get =
a
nice City+/FC roast on the Kona by going 1:45 past the first pop of first
crack.
It's definitely a learning process and different from the popper that you
can see what's going on.  It's a great roasting method though.  I can't
drink the coffee fast enough to keep up with my learning curve!
Wes
On 2/14/06, Geary Lyons  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/14/06, Wesley Simon  wrote:
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WalMart (and many other places with "kitchen gadgets") sell a stainless
steel "sink strainer" for about 12-16 bucks which works well, too. It is a
rectangular screen basket about 8" x 12 " and about 2" deep with extensible
"handles" which are designed to let it adjust to various sink sizes.  If yo=
u
sit that right on top of a standard 20" box fan (and the fan laid flat up o=
n
bricks or boxes to give some inlet airflow clearance underneath), you can
cool down a couple of pounds in 2-3 minutes to where they only feel slightl=
y
warm to the touch.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

10) From: Jerry Procopio
Charbroil sells a bit better thermometer than comes stock on grills.  As 
I recall it goes for somewhere around $20 at Home Depot.  I mounted mine 
so the thermocouple probe is pretty close to even with the height of the 
center of the drum.  I don't know how accurate it is, but I can control 
my roasts using it as a guide.  One must remember that most of us using 
the RK drum have different setups so temperatures and times will vary.
I don't usually have a problem separating first & second cracks.  I'm 
using a 40K BTU Fiesta grill which is a 2 burner with a 10K side burner. 
  I pretty much follow Ron's 1 1/2 pound standard profile for roasts up 
to 2 1/2 pounds.  For 2 1/2 to 4 pound roasts, I run everything about 
50° - 60° hotter.  I found that if you don't lower the heat by the time 
you get a rolling 1st crack, you're likely to run right into second with 
barely more than a pause.  I usually wait about 30 seconds after 1st has 
started, then lower my burners all the way.  My goal is to get the 
temperature down below 450° - ideally around 440°.  Sometimes I have to 
turn one burner completely off to get the temperature to drop enough.  I 
try to hold it in the 440° - 450° range for at least 4 minutes past when 
1st crack started (real 1st crack, not just the outliers that happen as 
much as 30 seconds before 1s gets going).  I usually get to stretch the 
roast for about 6 minutes from the beginning of 1st to end of roast 
(EOR).  When I am ready for EOR, if it hasn't happened already, I turn 
my burners up just a bit and usually within 30 seconds 2nd crack starts. 
  I turn the burners off, stop the drum, pull the pin & dump into my 
cooler.  It seems to me that larger roasts are easier to control than 
smaller ones and that 2nd crack, even once it has started, is slower in 
a larger (2+ pound) roast, but if you are cooling with a fan that will 
stop the beans cooking rather quickly, there is no need to panic once 
2nd starts.  Second crack in the drum seems to be a little slower and 
drawn out than second crack in a popper or iRoast.  I wouldn't stake my 
stash on that statement, but that's the way it seems to me.
Jerry
Wesley Simon wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Geary Lyons
Jerry wrote:
Geary,
Welcome to the world of RK Drum roasting.  If you don't have them
already, I'd suggest a pair of welders gloves.  They's thick enough to
keep you from getting burned, and thin enough so you can push/pull that
cotter pin out by hand instead of trying to mess around with pliers.
Wait till you see Ron's motor setup in person.  Great craftsmanship.
You'll really be pleased.
Jerry
I am on the prowl for the gloves. I stuck leather work gloves inside kitchen
mitts for the very short term. Clumsy as all h@!!, but no burns!  This
morning I tried the Harrar that I roasted last evening. Very nice, not as
bright as my popper roasts, smoother finish, but no real difference in the
core flavor profile. But only a 12 hour rest!
I am anxious for the motor to arrive.  If the craftsmanship approaches the
drum, I will be thrilled.  My old 3 rpm Charbroil just barely gets the job
done!  Roasts are a little uneven, but that is probably, as much, my
learning curve.
Cheers,
Geary

12) From: Geary Lyons
Wes wrote:
Geary,
I recently recieved and setup my drum.  I also purchased the faster motor.
The only piece I'm missing is a 16" diameter sifter for cooling.  I put one
on order from a local restaurant supply place.  I have a small collander, so
my batch sizes have been only a pound at a time.  "Only a pound!"  HA!  Even
at a pound, it's so much nicer than my old popper method.
Last night, I roasted a pound of Rwandan and a pound of Kona.
I'm having trouble differentiating between the first and second crack.  In
Les' roast profile, it talks about 2-3 minutes between first and second.  I
turn my grill all the way down at the first pop of the first crack.  I'm
hitting first crack somewhere around 9-10 minutes rather than 8-9.  Perhaps
I should bump up the temperature a little.  My cheap char-broil thermometer
says that I'm near 600 degrees, but I don't believe it.  It couldn't reach
first crack when it read 470-500 degrees.  Anyway, it seems like first and
second crack run together.  I'm not sure at this point.  I was able to get a
nice City+/FC roast on the Kona by going 1:45 past the first pop of first
crack.
It's definitely a learning process and different from the popper that you
can see what's going on.  It's a great roasting method though.  I can't
drink the coffee fast enough to keep up with my learning curve!
Wes
Wes,
Since I am currently roasting only about 5-6 ounces, my colander and small
fan are working well for cooling.  I will start looking for the larger
sifter. We have a couple restaurant supply houses in the area.
I was worried about hearing and differentiating the cracks, especially with
my current smallish batches.  Quite honestly I could hear them as well, or
better, than my poppers or heat gun, simply because the grill/drum combo is
so much quieter.  I preheated to 500F, on my less than ideal thermometer
setup, (high in the hood), recovery to 460-470 was only 3-4 minutes.  I held
the temps at 465-475F through first, then backed it down to about 445F
through second.
I hit 1st in all 4 batches between 9:45 and 10:00 minutes.  Second was at
12:00 to 13:00.  (The decaf was a little quicker.)  Bear in mind the batch
size and slow rotation.
Cheers,
Geary

13) From: Brett Mason
That will make Debbie happy - I already toasted her new pot holders...
Brett
On 2/14/06, Geary Lyons  wrote:
<Snip>
hen
<Snip>
e
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e
<Snip>
b
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

14) From: Jerry Procopio
Harrar often roasts unevenly - no matter what you do..... unless you 
take it FC++ which IMO is overroast for Harrar.
Geary Lyons wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/14/06, Geary Lyons  wrote:
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e
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e
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b
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Here's the gloves I got for use with the drum:
Item #      Item                             Unit Qty Total Price
------------------------------------------------------------------
GG1314KNWL     KEVLAR HEAT GLO - 14" length, ext  PR  1      $32.51
------------------------------------------------------------------
Ordered from:       www.magidglove.com
They are safe for the temps found in the roasting work.  I have never even
come close to burning with them. It is only slightly warm, even holding the
drum for a while.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

16) From: Terry Stockdale
At 09:27 AM 2/14/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
I use both a "New Braunfels Smoker" thermometer (Home Depot, $20) and 
a digital thermometer with thermocouple (Sweet Maria's, $29.90).
I just looked and my RK Drum page had my old, "piece of copper 
tubing" stuck in the side still on the page.  So, I took some 
pictures and put together another page.
I just added a new page focusing on the my digital thermometer setup:http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffee/rkdrum_roaster_5.phpTerry
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My Coffee Pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages:  http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrum">http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffeeMy Hottop pages:http://www.terrystockdale.com/hottopMy RK Drum pages:  http://www.terrystockdale.com/rkdrum

17) From: Brian Kamnetz
"..roasted 4 test batches of 150 gr. each...."
I'm surprised that you can roast batches this small in the RK drum.
Somehow I had the idea that you needed more bean mass, up to Ron's
intended max of around 4#.
Brian

18) From: Les
Brian,
I have roasted from one bean to 5 pounds.  I did one bean just to see
if it could be done.    My normal roast is 1-1.5 pounds and have
awesome profile control at that level.  The RK is very flexible.
Les
On 2/14/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

19) From: David Echelbarger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
As for  pulling the pin.  I use a metal ruler and just push it out.  Works
slick and fast.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Justin Marquez
Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 12:39 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New RK Drum
On 2/14/06, Geary Lyons  wrote: 
Jerry wrote:
Geary,
Welcome to the world of RK Drum roasting.  If you don't have them
already, I'd suggest a pair of welders gloves.  They's thick enough to 
keep you from getting burned, and thin enough so you can push/pull that
cotter pin out by hand instead of trying to mess around with pliers.
Wait till you see Ron's motor setup in person.  Great craftsmanship. 
You'll really be pleased.
Jerry
I am on the prowl for the gloves. I stuck leather work gloves inside kitchen
mitts for the very short term. Clumsy as all h@!!, but no burns!  This
morning I tried the Harrar that I roasted last evening. Very nice, not as 
bright as my popper roasts, smoother finish, but no real difference in the
core flavor profile. But only a 12 hour rest!
I am anxious for the motor to arrive.  If the craftsmanship approaches the
drum, I will be thrilled.  My old 3 rpm Charbroil just barely gets the job 
done!  Roasts are a little uneven, but that is probably, as much, my
learning curve.
Cheers,
Geary
Here's the gloves I got for use with the drum:
Item #      Item                             Unit Qty Total Price
------------------------------------------------------------------
GG1314KNWL     KEVLAR HEAT GLO - 14" length, ext  PR  1      $32.51
------------------------------------------------------------------
Ordered from:       www.magidglove.com
They are safe for the temps found in the roasting work.  I have never even
come close to burning with them. It is only slightly warm, even holding the
drum for a while. 
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com 

20) From: Brian Kamnetz
Very interesting, Les. (That crunching noise you hear is my roasting
assumptions structure crashing into primordial mental soup and
reforming primitive mental continents....)
Brian
On 2/14/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

21) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/14/06, David Echelbarger  wrote:
<Snip>
Needle-nosed pliers work well, too.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

22) From: Geary Lyons
Hi Brian,
I'll defer to Les's comment on this.  Most of my personal consumption
roasting, for the foreseeable future, will be 5 to 10 ounces to yield .25 to
.5 pounds roasted.  Several list members referenced Les's 1 bean test, which
was the tipping point for me.  It will be nice to do roasts to yield a pound
or more for gifting.  (I did not enjoy doing enough roasts in a popper to
give someone a pound.!!)  I have only done 7 roasts, (in 24 hours since I
received the drum), but there is NO buyer's remorse here!!
Cheers,
Geary
Geary wrote:
"..roasted 4 test batches of 150 gr. each...."
Brian wrote:
I'm surprised that you can roast batches this small in the RK drum.
Somehow I had the idea that you needed more bean mass, up to Ron's
intended max of around 4#.
Brian

23) From: Jeff Oien
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
I regularly do 110 gr roasts. I'm still refining the process
but it works well. Would like to hear from others who do this.
JeffO

24) From: David Echelbarger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
The cool thing about the ruler method - it was much faster for me than the
pliers, plus I can do it with my gloves on which is important when I want to
get that drum off fast.  Whatever works.  With all these new coffees, I've
been roasting lots of small batches these days.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Justin Marquez
Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 10:07 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New RK Drum
On 2/14/06, David Echelbarger  wrote: 
As for  pulling the pin.  I use a metal ruler and just push it out.  Works
slick and fast.  
Needle-nosed pliers work well, too.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

25) From: David Echelbarger
Typically I do the following roasts in grams: 150; 300; 454; 754 and 908.
I've done more on occasion.  Each gram weight has its own profile.  That is
to say I start with a different beginning temperature and have a temp I need
to reach incrementally at 8 minutes.  During my long learning curve (took 3
24 roasts to finally settle in on this) I discovered that too much heat
early, or two fast a ramp gave me a green taste.  For instance, two roasts
that have the same time to the 1st crack but had more heat applied early
with less of a gradual ramp, tasted green.  My learning curve was
complicated by some green practice beans I bought from a local coffee shop.
They turned out to be baggy and that tossed off my work until I started
doing reference roasts with my Back to Basics popper.  That's why I
recommend for new RK Drum roasters to use a good single bean when one begins
to zero in on profiles. 
Here is a for instance:    I use a digital temp gauge mounted just above the
drum and use a steel baffle (which was crucial for me).  All temps are
relative to my roaster.  The Analog temp gauge of the grill I find to be
somewhat useless, although when I preheat, I make sure that one reads at
least 350.   A 150 gram roast looks like this: I start it at 480 degrees.
In one minute I record the temp again -- It falls to about 400.  My goal is
to reach the heat up temp of 480 at 8 minutes.  So I want the roast to
increase at about 11 degrees per minute.  I try to be spot on.  The
interesting thing is that it often will do this naturally without any dial
adjustments, but I certainly can and do tweak the grill temps if necessary.
Once I reach the 480 mark at 8 minutes I just keep the ramp going at about
10 degrees a minute.  My first crack usually comes between 10 and 12
minutes.  Once it starts I immediately open the grill hood for a moment,
close it and let it come back to the 480 mark.  Open again.  1st crack lasts
about 2 minutes for me.  Then I dump or continue my roast to the desired
level.
A 908 gram roasts begins with a start temp of 540 and I try to get back to
540 in equal increments by 8 minutes.  Same profile, different starting and
ending points.  300 grams begin at 500.
Learning how to roast good coffee in an RK drum will convince you that it is
an art.

26) From: Brian Kamnetz
David,
Great stuff. Thanks.
Brian
On 2/15/06, David Echelbarger  wrote:
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27) From: Justin Marquez
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d3d3Lmp1c3RpbmFuZGxpbmRhLmNvbQo=

28) From: Rich Adams
I replaced the supplied lock pin with a lock pin much smaller in thickness, 
ACE hardware has a multitude of sizes and thicknesses, I picked one that was 
*about* the same thickness as a paper clip, maybe a little thicker.   I use 
one finger and a gentle pull on the chain, it unlocks the door with ease. 
The door doesn't need such a heavy gauged pin to hold it shut, just 
something that would pass through the hole and not come out during the 
rotations.
I came about changing the pin because of the time required it took to get 
the thicker one out DURING the time I want to be ending the roast and not 
prolonging it.
Respectfully,
Rich Adams

29) From: R.N.Kyle
Only one thing to look out for using a smaller clip is may allow the door to 
move slightly away from the drum, possibly allowing peaberrys and Yemens to 
fall out during the roast. The Pin is fit so that it holds the door snuggly 
against the drum.
Oaxaca Charlie said he use large paper clips for his drum, so I guess in 
some cases this may work well.
If you think the pin is too tight you can take a small drill and route the 
hole out further away from the drum a bit just to loosen up the clip. Be 
careful not to enlarge the hole to much, do a little and test the fit.
RK

30) From:
Hmmm-
"...you can cool down a couple of pounds in 2-3 minutes to where they
only feel slightly warm to the touch."
Or- you can dump a pound of beans at an accelerating, smoking 2nd
crack in an 11-in screen mesh colander in the intake venturi of a
$2.00 furnace blower. Cold to the touch in 15 seconds. Two pounds took
more like 28 seconds, and they were stone cold from the start of
second crack.
I couldn't put anything in the blower's air blast- they'd be blown all
over the place.
The first 25 or 30 degree drop probably stops the roast, but the beans
might retain interior heat. They stay cold after 30 seconds in the
airflow.
The furnace was 120K BTUH gas fired. Pristine, I could have had the
whole thing for $35 except it wouldn't fit in my little Bronco. Drat-
a perfect NG fired drum roaster. But I don't even have a roasting shed
yet. Oh, well-
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
It's the Grinder-

31) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/17/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
There was some discussion here that too fast cooling was not optimal, but I
don't know that anything was tested definitively on that.  Certainly your
method is very efficient!  I had a 20" box fan and some bricks; I didn't
have a spare furnace blower laying around.
{grin}
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

32) From: Rich Adams

33) From: Jeff Halvorson
One question I haven't completely found an answer to in regards to the RK
Drum.
Do you have to have a dedicated grill to roast in or can you share your
normal grill?  I would assume you need dedicated so you don't get food
smells in your beans, but not sure.
Thanks....
jh

34) From: R.N.Kyle
Jeff, there are some that use the grill for both cooking and roasting, =
and have reported no transfer of flavors. 
This may be true, I do not know personally as I have always used a =
dedicated grill for roasting.
Even if it did not transfer flavors, it would be pain braking down the =
cooking set up and setting up the roasting set up each time. 
I recommend a dedicated grill for Roasting.
RK

35) From: David Echelbarger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think you want a dedicated grill.  Don't want grill flavors to taint the
beans.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff Halvorson
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2006 1:00 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New RK Drum
One question I haven't completely found an answer to in regards to the RK
Drum.  
Do you have to have a dedicated grill to roast in or can you share your
normal grill?  I would assume you need dedicated so you don't get food
smells in your beans, but not sure. 
Thanks....
jh

36) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
With the latest craze over chipotle chilies and the flavor in almost
everything in fast foods we could offer the market a new flavor by
alternating roasting jalapenos and coffee in the outdoor drum
roasters..."Now that's REALLY HOT coffee." Or the chipotles would have a
REAL smoked flavor.
 
No sale????
O.K. I will return to the sidelines...
 
TerryT  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of David
Echelbarger
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2006 3:30 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +New RK Drum
 
I think you want a dedicated grill.  Don't want grill flavors to taint
the beans.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeff
Halvorson
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2006 1:00 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New RK Drum
 
One question I haven't completely found an answer to in regards to the
RK Drum.  
Do you have to have a dedicated grill to roast in or can you share your
normal grill?  I would assume you need dedicated so you don't get food
smells in your beans, but not sure. 
Thanks....
jh

37) From: Jason Molinari
when  roasted on my grill, i only had 1, didn't taste
any burger in my coffee, or any coffee in my burger.
--- David Echelbarger 
wrote:
<Snip>

38) From: Jeff Halvorson
Cool, thanks for the responses on that.  Sounds like, though a pain, I coul=
d
use 1 until a budget allows a new grill, as long as cleaning was a priority=
.
jh

39) From: b cook
A little OT but that reminds me of when my wife and I stayed at a Bed and
Breakfast in Fredricksburg, TX a year ago there was a guy there who runs
this "Mesquite Roasted Coffee Co." http://www.mesquite-roasted.com/). The=
y
served the coffee at the BnB.  It was..meh.  Seemed kinda "Texas gimmicky"
to me because they all the marketing is about the mesquite and not at all
about the quality of the coffee.
brad cook
Terry Titsworth said:
"With the latest craze over chipotle chilies and the flavor in almost
everything in fast foods we could offer the market a new flavor by
alternating roasting jalapenos and coffee in the outdoor drum roasters…"N=
ow
that's REALLY HOT coffee." Or the chipotles would have a REAL smoked
flavor."

40) From: Brian Kamnetz
Terry, do people roast green or red chilis where you are?
Brian
On 2/20/06, TERRY TITSWORTH  wrote:
<Snip>
"Now
<Snip>
or.
<Snip>
e
<Snip>

41) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/20/06, b cook  wrote:
<Snip>
not
<Snip>
I have never tried it. I saw that he advertised on ebay.  I just can't
imagine that mesquite flavor would improve good coffee. BAD coffee...
maybe.  Mesquite is exquisite for grilling meat, but that smoke is so funky
and pungent that I just can't see it for coffee.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

42) From: Bill Morgan
OMG he offers mesquite roasted chocolate, too!  My mouth is silently
shrieking at the thought.
However, I'm just pervertedly exploratory enough that I HAVE to taste
this stuff next time I'm around Fredericksburg.  I'll let you know.
Bill
On 2/21/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
ey
<Snip>
of
<Snip>
be.
<Snip>

43) From: tom ulmer
It's probably better than chicory.
Most of the Central and South American dark chocolates I've tried have a
decidedly smoky flavor. I bet mesquite would add a nice component.


HomeRoast Digest