HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 1st and 2nd crack newbie question (46 msgs / 1431 lines)
1) From: Cheryl Alexander
Okay, just my UGH beans from SM's, and I put about 4 oz in the Poppery to see how this stuff works. I have a small point of confusion; after the beans went about 3 minutes I heard a FEW pops, and then it stopped. The beans started expanding and a few minutes later there was really LOTS of pops---------almost like popcorn at full throttle. What I am not sure of is if I was hearing 1st crack or second crack. Is 1st crack not very "busy" and the 2nd one goes like crazy?
 I stopped the beans after they had popped for probably 20 seconds, and turned off the machine. THEN they started smoking. This is the UGH stuff, so the colors are pretty uneven. Some are a pretty dark brown and some are still light. 
 Was I hearing 1st crack or 2nd?
 
 thanks, and sorry!
 Cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/

2) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Sounds like 1st, then 2nd.
Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
Cheryl,
Four oz is probably too much for the popper. Your description sounds
like my roasts when they get away from me, go too fast, where first
crack blends into second crack and the roasts races, and I end up with
an oily charred smoking mess. I would suggest what someone on this
list suggested to me when I was just starting, and that is to start
with 1/3 cup of greens, just to see the process actually work - green,
yellow, tan, brown, first crack (lasts about 1-2 mins, though some
batches have only a few audible cracks; they are loud, like twigs
snapping), pause (1-2 mins), second crack (not very loud, often
described as sounding like Rice Crispies in milk). After that, slowly
increase the amount of greens in successive roasts.
Good luck! And be patient; I ruined LOTS of beans before I figured out
what should generally happen in a roast, and how to make that happen.
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>
 see how this stuff works. I have a small point of confusion; after the bea=
ns went about 3 minutes I heard a FEW pops, and then it stopped. The beans =
started expanding and a few minutes later there was really LOTS of pops----=
-----almost like popcorn at full throttle. What I am not sure of is if I wa=
s hearing 1st crack or second crack. Is 1st crack not very "busy" and the 2=
nd one goes like crazy?
<Snip>
urned off the machine. THEN they started smoking. This is the UGH stuff, so=
 the colors are pretty uneven. Some are a pretty dark brown and some are st=
ill light.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

4) From: Cheryl Alexander
I only used 4 oz because that's what the popper called for (following SM's instructions also.) But I am sure you are right: a few less beans would make it easier to tell what's going on. There was, however, a lengthy pause between the first snaps and the second snaps. What I wasn't sure of was how MANY snaps I should be hearing in the 1st crack. 
 
 Going to run outside and try some more! :)
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Brian Kamnetz 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 12:23:18
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
Cheryl,
Four oz is probably too much for the popper. Your description sounds
like my roasts when they get away from me, go too fast, where first
crack blends into second crack and the roasts races, and I end up with
an oily charred smoking mess. I would suggest what someone on this
list suggested to me when I was just starting, and that is to start
with 1/3 cup of greens, just to see the process actually work - green,
yellow, tan, brown, first crack (lasts about 1-2 mins, though some
batches have only a few audible cracks; they are loud, like twigs
snapping), pause (1-2 mins), second crack (not very loud, often
described as sounding like Rice Crispies in milk). After that, slowly
increase the amount of greens in successive roasts.
Good luck! And be patient; I ruined LOTS of beans before I figured out
what should generally happen in a roast, and how to make that happen.
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Matt Henkel
On Mon, Jan 16, 2006 at 10:10:12AM -0800, Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
When I first started roasting I used some UGH and carbonized it because
there was no definitve 1st crack, but there was the same popcorn burst
so I was waiting for 2nd crack.  In effect there was no 1st crack and
2nd crack was what I, and most likely you, only heard a distinctive
second crack.  While I've had this happen with good beans as well,
although only peaberries, it's not usually an issue with Tom's quality
beans.
~/Matt

6) From: Michael Dhabolt
Cheryl,
Sounds (pun intended) to me like you were witnessing first crack.  I'm
baseing this on your description of the color of the beans at the end
and the fact that you state "THEN it started smoking".  A few 'pops'
at some time prior to the beans going into active first crack is not
unusuall.  You will usually start seeing some smoke prior to second
crack.  You didn't mention whether you are using a Poppery one or two.
 Are you getting good circulation of the beans in the roast chamber? 
Did you prop the back of the popper up a little so it is sitting at
about a 15 to 20 degree angle (this promotes circulation and an even
roast)?  The times of 3 minutes to the first few pops and a 'few'
minutes later to active first crack are not out of line.  Get the
beans out of the popper and cool them, Immediately, when you turn it
off.  You can 'tune' your roast times by less beans for a longer roast
and more beans for a faster roast (small changes) after you get
comfortable with the process.  Useing UGH beans at this stage of
analysis is certainly the right way to figure things out.
"Small point of confusion" - welcome aboard.
Mike (just plain)

7) From: Brian Kamnetz
"What I wasn't sure of was how MANY snaps I should be hearing in the 1st cr=
ack."
That can vary a lot, from none or just a couple to a whole lot of
really loud snaps lasting a couple minutes. The key is how loud they
are. First crack is LOTS louder than second crack!
Also, second crack should be able to last 30 secs or a minute without
lots of smoke or oil. In my experience, if there is LOTS of smoke and
the beans quickly get oily, the roast is racing and you need to slow
it down. The simplest way to do that is probably to reduce the size of
your batch.
Hope that helps,
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>
s instructions also.) But I am sure you are right: a few less beans would m=
ake it easier to tell what's going on. There was, however, a lengthy pause =
between the first snaps and the second snaps. What I wasn't sure of was how=
 MANY snaps I should be hearing in the 1st crack.
<Snip>
to see how this stuff works. I have a small point of confusion; after the b=
eans went about 3 minutes I heard a FEW pops, and then it stopped. The bean=
s started expanding and a few minutes later there was really LOTS of pops--=
-------almost like popcorn at full throttle. What I am not sure of is if I =
was hearing 1st crack or second crack. Is 1st crack not very "busy" and the=
 2nd one goes like crazy?
<Snip>
 turned off the machine. THEN they started smoking. This is the UGH stuff, =
so the colors are pretty uneven. Some are a pretty dark brown and some are =
still light.
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

8) From: Dave McCracken
--On Monday, January 16, 2006 10:10:12 -0800 Cheryl Alexander
 wrote:
<Snip>
My experience with various beans is that first crack varies from scattered
pops through a fairly steady, if measured, popping.  Second crack is where
the cracking goes crazy like a machine gun (I like the rice krispies
analogy... it sounds close to that).  Also listen to the pops.  First crack
is a deeper sound while second crack is higher pitched.  This distinction
in pitch is my best indicator of where the beans are.
Dave McCracken

9) From: Cheryl Alexander
That's it exactly! I only heard a few loud cracks (like twigs snapping) and then it was awhile before I heard the multiple "rice krispies" sound. Just did a second batch with less beans, but I had to stir them to keep them from just spinning instead of tossing.
 
 Very helpful, thank you!
 
 cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Matt Henkel 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 12:31:43
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
On Mon, Jan 16, 2006 at 10:10:12AM -0800, Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
When I first started roasting I used some UGH and carbonized it because
there was no definitve 1st crack, but there was the same popcorn burst
so I was waiting for 2nd crack.  In effect there was no 1st crack and
2nd crack was what I, and most likely you, only heard a distinctive
second crack.  While I've had this happen with good beans as well,
although only peaberries, it's not usually an issue with Tom's quality
beans.
~/Matt

10) From: Cheryl Alexander
VERY helpful! It must be working right, because I hardly got any smoke. Didn't really see the smoke until I stopped the machine and poured the beans out. THEN some smoke came rolling, but not lots. The beans only look slightly oily, and nothing is on fire! :)
 Guess I didn't burn them up!
 
 Thanks ever so much. You folks are GREAT!
 
 cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Brian Kamnetz 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 12:37:08
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
"What I wasn't sure of was how MANY snaps I should be hearing in the 1st crack."
That can vary a lot, from none or just a couple to a whole lot of
really loud snaps lasting a couple minutes. The key is how loud they
are. First crack is LOTS louder than second crack!
Also, second crack should be able to last 30 secs or a minute without
lots of smoke or oil. In my experience, if there is LOTS of smoke and
the beans quickly get oily, the roast is racing and you need to slow
it down. The simplest way to do that is probably to reduce the size of
your batch.
Hope that helps,
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Tim TenClay
Cheryl...
I'm guessing you heard 1st crack -- I often find that I have a couple of
beans that reach first (or second) well before (or after) the rest.  If it
sounds like popcorn, it's probably first crack, too.  2nd Crack will sound
higher pitched.
As for amounts - I routinely do more than 4 oz, but I have a wodden dowel
that I use to mix the beans almost through the whole process (the air isn't
strong enough to move them adequately.)
Hope that helps.
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
--
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog

12) From: Brian Kamnetz
That's what it takes, lots of experience and experimentation (and in
my case, lots of ruined beans - it was smart of you to get the Ugh!
beans) to learn the stages of the roasting process, and to find out
what methods work for you, given how hot your popper gets, how strong
the fan is, etc etc. Sounds like you are getting there!
Congratulations!
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>
nd then it was awhile before I heard the multiple "rice krispies" sound. Ju=
st did a second batch with less beans, but I had to stir them to keep them =
from just spinning instead of tossing.
<Snip>
to see how this stuff works. I have a small point of confusion; after the b=
eans went about 3 minutes I heard a FEW pops, and then it stopped. The bean=
s started expanding and a few minutes later there was really LOTS of pops--=
-------almost like popcorn at full throttle. What I am not sure of is if I =
was hearing 1st crack or second crack. Is 1st crack not very "busy" and the=
 2nd one goes like crazy?
<Snip>
 turned off the machine. THEN they started smoking. This is the UGH stuff, =
so the colors are pretty uneven. Some are a pretty dark brown and some are =
still light.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

13) From: Michael Dhabolt
Cheryl,
<Snip>
Discount my last post.  Looks like you made it through second.  Do try
tilting the popper to promote bean circulation rather than having to
'stir', works with some machines and bean loads, and doesn't with
others.
Mike (just plain)

14) From: Cheryl Alexander
Just tried a third batch, and decided to let 'r rip, and see if I could get to French roast (or close) to see if I was really getting through 2nd crack. I WAS! I think will dub this stage the "Dog Run" stage. I was sitting on the front porch roasting, with my border collie sitting close by, watching with great interest. When it finished 2nd crack (I presume) and started smoking quite a bit, the DOG RAN!
 
 hee hee hee
 
 Almost ready to try some REAL beans next. Think I'll try one more UGH batch.
 
 Thanks for all the help! And thanks to the list member (you know who you are) who sold me the Poppery, and gave me lots of good advice besides!
 
 cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Michael Dhabolt 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 13:19:28
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
Cheryl,
<Snip>
Discount my last post.  Looks like you made it through second.  Do try
tilting the popper to promote bean circulation rather than having to
'stir', works with some machines and bean loads, and doesn't with
others.
Mike (just plain)

15) From: Aaron
sometimes that will happen, you will get a few pops and then later a lot 
more.
First crack like you said, will sound like snapping, maybe not as loud 
as popcorn but you seem to have the idea.  Seems you got a good rolling 
first crack.  Sometimes that won't happen where they will just roll 
along,  I have had some batches where first crack happened, but just 
dragged along and along for a few minutes almost.  All beans are 
different and what one will do, another will want to behave differently.
Second crack is more subtle, kind of like rice krispies a fainter snap.
This is fairly normal that some beans will crack before others, 
especially if you are at a heat transient where you change the 
temperature upwards.  This is one of the reasons you should not rely 
solely on 'crack' to determine when to finish your roast but should look 
at the color as well.  Between the two you should have good results.
It sounds like you are getting the hang of it pretty well already, we 
all were at that stage at one time.  Oh and another thing, even IF you 
ruined it, it's UGH, who cares!!
As long as they aren't black and leaving charcoal streaks on the roaster 
you should be good to go
Aaron

16) From: Aaron
that's the thing, you wont actually see much smoke coming out of the 
roaster unil you look up and across the room and everything is in a fog 
... not that I have ever done that ")   Roasting will make smoke, but if 
you are getting a lot of smoke, you either are going way too long on the 
roast or are roasting too hot.
As you have seen, pretty much everyone who responded had a slightly 
different answer.  That's the thing about coffee roasting.  What may 
work for me in my machine, might not be at all what you experience in 
your machine... sometimes even if we both have the same type of 
roaster!  After you have roasted a few batches and have got used to what 
your machine is doing, and the sounds of the coffee, you will get the 
hang of it and be making plenty of coffee for all your newfound friends 
who will want some of 'your' brew.  That's something you probably have 
not been warned about.  Once you start grinding the beans and brewing it 
fresh.  The smell alone is going to bring big crowds over, and if you 
happen to share any, you are going to know what the pied piper feels like :)
Enjoy it, it only gets better... and I dare say.  more expensive as you 
want more and more coffee toys.
Aaron

17) From: Scot Murphy
On |Jan 16, at 12:55 PM|Jan 16, Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
Here's a nickel's worth of more free advice: if you see oil on the  
beans now, you will see a LOT of oil on the beans later. Beans will  
develop more oil, depending on the roast, as they sit for a day or  
two. A roast that comes out totally dry may develop specks of oil  
later, and it's pretty much a given that if your beans have a sheen  
when they come out of the popper, they'll be plain ol' slick later.  
I'll leave it to the list as to why this may be good or bad.
Scot "beans by Exxon" Murphy
---
"Voters want a fraud they can believe in."
	--Will Durst

18) From: Cheryl Alexander
Roasted my first batch of the REAL beans! Java Government Estate (that doesn't mean much to me right now), and roasted to what I think is Full City +. A few of the beans look less done------more like Full City or even City+. But that's okay for my first stab at real beans. They behaved much differently than the UGH beans; they (UGH beans) barely sounded a 1st crack for me. These nice beans displayed a much greater differentiation between 1st and 2nd crack. EASIER is what I'm trying to say. They even smell good! :) No comment on what the UGH beans smell like. :D
 
 The real test will be when I grind them tomorrow for breakfast coffee. In the meantime, I have some of Tom's professionally roasted beans to tide me over today until I can taste my own!
 
 This is SO cool!
 
 cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Aaron 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 14:28:23
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
sometimes that will happen, you will get a few pops and then later a lot 
more.
First crack like you said, will sound like snapping, maybe not as loud 
as popcorn but you seem to have the idea.  Seems you got a good rolling 
first crack.  Sometimes that won't happen where they will just roll 
along,  I have had some batches where first crack happened, but just 
dragged along and along for a few minutes almost.  All beans are 
different and what one will do, another will want to behave differently.
Second crack is more subtle, kind of like rice krispies a fainter snap.
This is fairly normal that some beans will crack before others, 
especially if you are at a heat transient where you change the 
temperature upwards.  This is one of the reasons you should not rely 
solely on 'crack' to determine when to finish your roast but should look 
at the color as well.  Between the two you should have good results.
It sounds like you are getting the hang of it pretty well already, we 
all were at that stage at one time.  Oh and another thing, even IF you 
ruined it, it's UGH, who cares!!
As long as they aren't black and leaving charcoal streaks on the roaster 
you should be good to go
Aaron

19) From: Brian Kamnetz
As you may have heard, most beans can be used immediately, but are
much better after "resting" for a minimum of two days. Their
characteristics change daily from the time of roasting until they get
stale and rancid.
Brian
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>
esn't mean much to me right now), and roasted to what I think is Full City =
+. A few of the beans look less done------more like Full City or even City+=
. But that's okay for my first stab at real beans. They behaved much differ=
ently than the UGH beans; they (UGH beans) barely sounded a 1st crack for m=
e. These nice beans displayed a much greater differentiation between 1st an=
d 2nd crack. EASIER is what I'm trying to say. They even smell good! :) No =
comment on what the UGH beans smell like. :D
<Snip>
n the meantime, I have some of Tom's professionally roasted beans to tide m=
e over today until I can taste my own!
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

20) From: Sheila Quinn
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------080205090301040107050504
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Hi Cheryl,
I roasted some UGH beans this weekend, too. I'd never bought them before 
and just had to try them out to see how bad they really are... and well, 
now I know why they call them UGH! Even the smell of the roast is 
weird... and as I smell the beans now, they smell disgusting. I really 
wanted to try to taste it to see just how terrible it is, but not sure 
it's worth it. If they smell that nasty, imagine how they'll taste!! I 
find it hard to believe that people would actually drink this stuff.
Sheila -- feeling sick just thinking about it!
<Snip>
--------------080205090301040107050504
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
  
Hi Cheryl,
I roasted some UGH beans this weekend, too. I'd never bought them
before and just had to try them out to see how bad they really are...
and well, now I know why they call them UGH! Even the smell of the
roast is weird... and as I smell the beans now, they smell disgusting.
I really wanted to try to taste it to see just how terrible it is, but
not sure it's worth it. If they smell that nasty, imagine how they'll
taste!! I find it hard to believe that people would actually drink this
stuff.
Sheila -- feeling sick just thinking about it!
  
    
      
        
        Subject:
        
+1st and 2nd crack newbie question
      
      
        
        From: 
Cheryl Alexander <yakluv45>
      
      
        
        Date: 
Mon, 16 Jan 2006 10:10:12 -0800 (PST)
      
      
        
        To: 
Sweet Maria's HomeRoast <homeroast>
      
    
  
  
    
      
        
        To: 
Sweet Maria's HomeRoast <homeroast>
      
    
  
  
  Okay, just my UGH beans from SM's, and I put about 4 oz in the Poppery to see how this stuff works. I have a small point of confusion; after the beans went about 3 minutes I heard a FEW pops, and then it stopped. The beans started expanding and a few minutes later there was really LOTS of pops---------almost like popcorn at full throttle. What I am not sure of is if I was hearing 1st crack or second crack. Is 1st crack not very "busy" and the 2nd one goes like crazy?
 I stopped the beans after they had popped for probably 20 seconds, and turned off the machine. THEN they started smoking. This is the UGH stuff, so the colors are pretty uneven. Some are a pretty dark brown and some are still light. 
 Was I hearing 1st crack or 2nd?
 
 thanks, and sorry!
 Cheryl
 
  
--------------080205090301040107050504--

21) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/16/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>
A roast like that is what you give away to your friends who are always
hangin' out at *$'s. ( and... UGH! is just fine for this, as charred beans
all petty much taste the same anyway.)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

22) From: Wesley Simon
Cheryl,
If you roasted your beans today and use them tomorrow morning, that will be
< 24 hours rest.  I've had coffee with about 24 hours of rest.  It's not
bad; it's just not at it's best.  The flavors seem really "bright."  My
experience has been that the flavors seem to "settle" after about 72 hours.
I've started waiting a minimum of 72 hours for it to rest.  If you roasted =
a
pound or more, you may wish to try it over the next few days to see how the
flavors change.
I had purchased an 8 lb sampler and roasted enough of several different one=
s
for two or three pots.  I was well into thinking that I had tried them
before I realized that I had drank them without a long enough rest period.
Went back through, roasted a minimum of a pound (or what was remaining), le=
t
it rest long enough, and then started my taste tests over.  The first time
through was meaningless as I had a different roast and a different waiting
period.
One thing that came to mind while reading your original post was that it is
impossible to get even roasts with my popper unless I'm going to go to SC o=
r
close to it.  Otherwise, I get a melange.  So far, my favorites have been
the Centrals.  I like some of the Sumatras.  I'd like to try some Kona,
Jamaica Blue Mountain, Uganda Bugisu, Mysore nuggets, some monsooned beans,
and several others, but I have to use some of what I've got.  I'm somewhere
around 80 lbs and I just started roasting back in October (I think).
On 1/16/06, Cheryl Alexander  wrote:
<Snip>
ity
<Snip>
y+.
<Snip>
ck
<Snip>
!
<Snip>
e
<Snip>

23) From: Matt Henkel
On Mon, Jan 16, 2006 at 04:07:12PM -0600, Wesley Simon wrote:
<Snip>
Don't underestimate coffee that's had less than a 24hr rest.  I've been
drinking the Sidamo a lot lately and have found that at 12hrs there are
some really nice floral notes that disappear as the cup "settles".
While bright coffees can be almost extruciatingly bright under 12hrs
they aren't always bad.
~/Matt

24) From: Sandy Andina
As a lifelong city kid I have had little opportunity to hear twigs  
snap, so to me 1st crack sounds more like an ill-mannered twit  
snapping her or his chewing gum.
On Jan 16, 2006, at 12:37 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

25) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
  Hi Cheryl,
  I roasted some UGH beans this weekend, too. I'd never bought them =
before and just had to try them out to see how bad they really are... =
and well, now I know why they call them UGH! Even the smell of the roast =
is weird... and as I smell the beans now, they smell disgusting. I =
really wanted to try to taste it to see just how terrible it is, but not =
sure it's worth it. If they smell that nasty, imagine how they'll =
taste!! I find it hard to believe that people would actually drink this =
stuff.
  Sheila -- feeling sick just thinking about it!
  A few months ago, I tried drinking some UGH. (Vietnamese Robusta)  It =
had a strong, somewhat dirty taste, but was still a lot better than =
commercial canned coffee.  This was not the worst home roasted coffee =
that I have tasted.  I got a bag from company "B."  This was supposed to =
be their flagship blend.  It had the not-so-delicate aroma and flavor of =
wet burlap.  Tom's UGH beat it hands down.  I guess this just shows how =
spoiled we can get buying from SM.  It also quickly taught me to not =
fool around with other vendors.  You may get something OK but you may =
also get garbage.   I know if I get something from SM that I don't like =
as much as other varieties that either I did something wrong in the =
roasting or I just don't care for that varietal.  There is virtually no =
chance that the beans were bad.     
  Another Mike

26) From: Peter Zulkowski
That too :)
PeterZ
Also has heard that sound, here in LHC
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Cheryl Alexander
At this point I don't think I'd consider buying from another vendor---------not the beans, anyway. It is obvious that SM's puts a  tremendous amount of time and effort into not only the beans, but into the educational end of it as well. I've looked all over the 'net, and nobody, but nobody has a website like SM's!
 
 I'm still looking at these Vietnamese beans and thinking "EL STINKO! How could I actually drink this?" But the curiosity will probably get the better of me, and I'll  brew up a small pot of the darkest roasted ones in the next few days.
 
 cheryl
  
 so many pens...so little time... 
http://www.gcwr.org/
 
----- Original Message ---- 
From: Mike Chester  
To: homeroast 
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 17:50:21 
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question 
 
   Hi Cheryl, 
 
I roasted some UGH beans this weekend, too. I'd never bought them before and just had to try them out to see how bad they really are... and well, now I know why they call them UGH! Even the smell of the roast is weird... and as I smell the beans now, they smell disgusting. I really wanted to try to taste it to see just how terrible it is, but not sure it's worth it. If they smell that nasty, imagine how they'll taste!! I find it hard to believe that people would actually drink this stuff. 
 
Sheila --    feeling sick just thinking about it! 
 
A few months ago, I tried drinking some UGH. (Vietnamese Robusta)  It had a strong, somewhat dirty taste, but was still a lot better than commercial canned coffee.  This was not the worst home roasted coffee that I have tasted.  I got a bag from company "B."  This was supposed to be their flagship blend.  It had the not-so-delicate aroma and flavor of wet burlap.  Tom's UGH beat it hands down.  I guess this just shows how spoiled we can get buying from SM.  It also quickly taught me to not fool around with other vendors.  You may get something OK but you may also get garbage.   I know if I get something from SM that I don't like as much as other varieties that either I did something wrong in the roasting or I just don't care for that varietal.  There is virtually no chance that the beans were bad.     
     
   Another Mike

28) From: National Prison Consultants
I started out a few months ago and bought some beans from another company.
Sorry, I won't go back.  If you have nothing to compare other company's
beans to, they are fine, but once you buy high quality bean (like SMs) you
never go back to another. 
John B. Webster
Managing Director
National Prison & Sentencing Consultants, Inc.
310 Bourne Avenue
East Providence, RI 02916
401-694-1294
Los Angeles  323-924-5154
www.nationalprisonconsultants.com
info

29) From: amyrobb
Okay, I admit, I'm a complete newbie to this forum and a newbie to home roasting in general.  I must say that I am kind of confused about the complexities of home roasting.  I don't mean that I am at a total loss; quite the opposite.  In my first few batches, I have either lucked out and gotten this whole thing right the first time around, or I am so clueless it isn't even funny.  I don't know which one is right in my case.
I spent about two weeks reading up on everything I could find about home roasting before I finally pulled the trigger.  I had an unused WB Poppery II sitting in my pantry collecting dust.  I figured I had nothing to lose and ordered 3 lbs. of fancy Kona from Aikane Kona Coffee.  Three days later, the green beans arrived.  I printed out the air popper roasting instructions from Sweet Maria's and carefully kept them at my side on the kitchen counter.  Following these instructions, I loaded 4 ounces of the green Kona into my unmodified popper and started roasting.  Within 3.5 minutes my beans had turned from green, to yellow, to golden brown, to a deep tan.  I started hearing the sounds of popping as if I were actually popping corn.  The 1st crack popping lasted about 30 seconds and gave way to the subtle whirring of the air popper.  A few moments later, my beans turned to a nice chocolaty brown, and I stopped my popper just I heard the very first snaps of what I imagine was the
  beginning of 2nd crack.  I immediately dumped the beans onto an aluminum pizza baking tray that was riddled with cooling holes.  I placed the tray on top of an upside-down box fan and the beans were cooled to less than room temperature in less than two minutes.
Now, with this being my very first batch of home-roasted beans, I could not control my enthusiasm.  I ground up just enough beans to brew 15 ounces of the liquid gold in my French Press.  The fresh roasted, fresh ground coffee was some of the best I had tasted in awhile.  However, I did notice a bit of an aftertaste that I could not quite explain, and it was not like any other Kona I had tasted.  The brew had somewhat of a tingly feeling on my tongue and left a bit of a tacky feeling on my teeth.  It wasn't the mellow, bright finish I usually associated with Kona.  I didn't know if I had messed up the roast, or if I had just been too eager to brew freshly roasted beans.
It has been three days since that first roast.  Each day, I have ground and brewed beans from that first batch.  And each day the flavor and aftertaste have mellowed and become just what I would expect of Kona: light and winey with low acidity and a bright finish.  Apparently, resting the fresh-roasted beans is just as important as everyone claims it to be.  All I have to say is call me hooked on home roasting!  I doubt I will ever go back to buying pre-roasted beans.
Now, the only question I have is did I just get extremely lucky as a first-timer, or did I mess up so bad and my palate is soooooo untrained that I wouldn't know good coffee if it jumped down my throat and choked me?  This process seemed too easy and to have gone too smoothly.  I must have screwed something up.  Has anyone else had good results from the very beginning?
Like I said, I am now hooked on home roasting.  I can't wait to learn even more about the process and to try new and different coffees that I cannot even pronounce!  Thanks!
--
If only some genius could bottle a Kona Peaberry Pinot Noir.  Mmm, coffee wine...  Would that be weird?

30) From: Cheryl Alexander
I think home roasting must be like any "hobby": you can make it as complex as you want, or as simple. Furthermore, I think SM's instructions are about as explicit as it gets (those are the ones I followed!), and I think they recommend the air popper as a beginner roaster for a very good reason: it's easy! My true test will be when I brew my beans---starting tomorrow---but honestly, they look and smell wonderful now, and it's only my first try. I did what you did: read, and read, and then took the plunge. What I did was order the $32 double sampler from SM's. You can't complain about the price, and you get to try lots of different beans.
 
 cheryl
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: amyrobb 
Now, the only question I have is did I just get extremely lucky as a first-timer, or did I mess up so bad and my palate is soooooo untrained that I wouldn't know good coffee if it jumped down my throat and choked me?  This process seemed too easy and to have gone too smoothly.  I must have screwed something up.  Has anyone else had good results from the very beginning?

31) From: Aaron
actually it sounds like you did it right the first time around.
Kona coffe needs a good rest period to bring out the very best in it I feel.
Also, kona tends to cook at a bit lower of a temp than the other 
coffee's too.
roasting your own coffee is not that difficult actually, as you have 
found out, even first time roasts turn out great.
I know it all sounds confusing when trying to read everything and 
everyone has their inputs etc etc then you try to absorb all the 
information on the web site.
After all that, now you don't know which end is up almost as you want to 
do your first batch, and re read about 50 times just to make sure you 
got it absolutely right.
When all is said and done, you go, wow, did *I* do that, that is GOOD!! 
and it was easy too!
Welcome to the club
Aaron

32) From: Les
First off, good job on your first roast!  Yes, roasting is that easy. 
You did your homework.  You have a great roaster and you did a good
job of cooling.  Speaking from experience (20+ years homeroasting),
you will really amaze yourself with some awesome Kona if you order
some from Tom.  My guess is you didn't get the best Kona beans. 
Second order a sampler pack from Tom and begin enjoying the wonderful
world of coffee.  To me the joy of homeroasting is the awesome variety
that is out there for us to enjoy.  Last week I enjoyed some very fine
Panama that is smooth and refined much like a good Kona and one of my
personal blends.  Today I had a very fine Kenya that was very complex
with a lot of fruit flavors.  Tomorrow will be some Aussie Mountain
Top with a lot of complex flavors much like a Kona but with chocolate
tones.  Welcome to the wonderful adventure of homeroasting.  Tomorrow
I will be roasting a fine Sumatra with its rich malty deep tone
flavors!  Don't get stuck on one coffee, there is too much great stuff
out there these days.
Les
On 1/16/06, amyrobb  wrote:
<Snip>
oasting in general.  I must say that I am kind of confused about the comple=
xities of home roasting.  I don't mean that I am at a total loss; quite the=
 opposite.  In my first few batches, I have either lucked out and gotten th=
is whole thing right the first time around, or I am so clueless it isn't ev=
en funny.  I don't know which one is right in my case.
<Snip>
roasting before I finally pulled the trigger.  I had an unused WB Poppery I=
I sitting in my pantry collecting dust.  I figured I had nothing to lose an=
d ordered 3 lbs. of fancy Kona from Aikane Kona Coffee.  Three days later, =
the green beans arrived.  I printed out the air popper roasting instruction=
s from Sweet Maria's and carefully kept them at my side on the kitchen coun=
ter.  Following these instructions, I loaded 4 ounces of the green Kona int=
o my unmodified popper and started roasting.  Within 3.5 minutes my beans h=
ad turned from green, to yellow, to golden brown, to a deep tan.  I started=
 hearing the sounds of popping as if I were actually popping corn.  The 1st=
 crack popping lasted about 30 seconds and gave way to the subtle whirring =
of the air popper.  A few moments later, my beans turned to a nice chocolat=
y brown, and I stopped my popper just I heard the very first snaps of what =
I imagine was the
<Snip>
 pizza baking tray that was riddled with cooling holes.  I placed the tray =
on top of an upside-down box fan and the beans were cooled to less than roo=
m temperature in less than two minutes.
<Snip>
ot control my enthusiasm.  I ground up just enough beans to brew 15 ounces =
of the liquid gold in my French Press.  The fresh roasted, fresh ground cof=
fee was some of the best I had tasted in awhile.  However, I did notice a b=
it of an aftertaste that I could not quite explain, and it was not like any=
 other Kona I had tasted.  The brew had somewhat of a tingly feeling on my =
tongue and left a bit of a tacky feeling on my teeth.  It wasn't the mellow=
, bright finish I usually associated with Kona.  I didn't know if I had mes=
sed up the roast, or if I had just been too eager to brew freshly roasted b=
eans.
<Snip>
nd brewed beans from that first batch.  And each day the flavor and afterta=
ste have mellowed and become just what I would expect of Kona: light and wi=
ney with low acidity and a bright finish.  Apparently, resting the fresh-ro=
asted beans is just as important as everyone claims it to be.  All I have t=
o say is call me hooked on home roasting!  I doubt I will ever go back to b=
uying pre-roasted beans.
<Snip>
t-timer, or did I mess up so bad and my palate is soooooo untrained that I =
wouldn't know good coffee if it jumped down my throat and choked me?  This =
process seemed too easy and to have gone too smoothly.  I must have screwed=
 something up.  Has anyone else had good results from the very beginning?
<Snip>
n more about the process and to try new and different coffees that I cannot=
 even pronounce!  Thanks!
<Snip>
 wine...  Would that be weird?
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

33) From: mIke mcKoffee
Les, you know Tom doesn't always get all the best Konas, many small Estates
only sell direct! You must have missed the mention of roasting greens from
Aikane Estate, they did come in Third at the Kona Cupping Competition this
year! Not only did their homework on roasting but their homework on Kona
too;-) Quite daring and committed to start one's home roasting journey with
such a fine greens specimen. 100 KSA points.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

34) From: mIke mcKoffee
Welcome, congratulations on your successful roast first try and enjoy the
journey.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
 
<Snip>

35) From: Rick Copple
Uh....yea.....everything they said. :-)
Cool beans.
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TXhttp://blog.copple.us/?sectionid=5

36) From: Michael Dhabolt
Certainly doesn't sound like luck to me.  You studied - you
accomplished.  Welcome aboard.
Mike (just plain).

37) From: Scot Murphy
On |Jan 16, at 5:58 PM|Jan 16, Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
To whom may I send the condolences?
Scot "she was a good lass while we knew 'er" Murphy
---
"Americans will put up with anything provided it doesn't block traffic."
		--Dan Rather

38) From: Spencer Thomas
On 1/16/06, amyrobb  wrote:
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
e a
<Snip>
any
<Snip>
ow,
<Snip>
sed
<Snip>
ns.
<Snip>
My guess:  Very freshly roasted coffee tastes different. (Others in this
thread have noted that Kona particularly benefits from resting.)  In
particular, I suspect that the "tingly feeling" came from dissolved CO2 --
freshly roasted beans contain a lot, and it will dissolve into the brew as
carbonic acid.  When I must brew shortly (immediately) after roasting, I
grind the coffee and let it rest for 5 minutes or so.  This lets more CO2
escape, and probably some of the other changes that occur when you rest the
whole beans for longer.  To my taste, I get a much better tasting cup when =
I
do this than if I just grind and brew.
--
=Spencer in Ann Arbor
My Unitarian Jihad http://tinyurl.com/6valr)Name is:
Sibling Dagger of Mild Reason
What are you?http://homepage.mac.com/whump/ujname.html

39) From: Cheryl Alexander
We all have a dark side, Scot....
 
 cheryl
 
so many pens...so little time... 
 http://www.gcwr.org/----- Original Message ----
From: Scot Murphy 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2006 02:53:02
Subject: Re: +1st and 2nd crack newbie question
On |Jan 16, at 5:58 PM|Jan 16, Cheryl Alexander wrote:
<Snip>
To whom may I send the condolences?
Scot "she was a good lass while we knew 'er" Murphy
---
"Americans will put up with anything provided it doesn't block traffic."
        --Dan Rather

40) From: Les
I figured you would give us the scoop on the Aikane!  However, most
folks get stuck with inferior beans unless they do their homework.  I
sure am glad he nailed his roast.  It would have been a shame to see
those go to waste!  I highly suggest new roaster start with a high
quality bean that is $5.00 or less a pound.  However, I started my
homeroasting adventure with JBM at $12.00 a pound for greens in 1983. 
So maybe I am not the best person to be giving advice I didn't listen
to myself!
Les
Confession is good for the soul!
On 1/16/06, mIke mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
m
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
th
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
nt
<Snip>
re.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

41) From: amyrobb
Well, I've roasted a total of five batches so far (at 4 oz. per batch).  And so far, I haven't burned up a single one!  It must be a combination of really good luck and doing my homework.  I'm having so much fun with this new-found hobby!
I must make another admission; at times I can be a complete obsessive freak, especially with a topic that I really like (e.g. coffee).  Because of this, I wasn't about to just jump into this home roasting thing without having some idea of what I was doing.  I really scoured the Internet for two weeks before finally deciding to give it a try.  Being obsessive, I like to make sure I have everything in place and know as much as possible before I start something, just to make sure my odds of succeeding are as high as possible.  I really hate failing in anything, and I REALLY would have hated burning up some good quality Kona.  I got the majority of my roasting information from Sweet Maria's, so kudos and thanks to everyone involved at SM.  You really made my start in this hobby very easy!
I kicked off my new hobby with a high grade Kona bean.  Yes, this was indeed a big gamble.  But Kona is my absolute favorite coffee, so why not start with what I like?  Also, let's put this into perspective.  When I was buying roasted Kona, I was going to my local Bad Ass Coffee franchise and paying $45 per pound for 100% Kona Peaberry!!!  The first batch of Kona greens that I bought from Aikane Kona Co. was 3 lbs. worth at $15 per pound.  Let's see, for pre-roasted Kona, 3 lbs. times $45 is $135.  For unroasted greens, 3 lbs. times $15 is only $45.  That's a savings of $90!  And firing up the WB Poppery II that was collecting dust in my pantry cost me nothing at all.  The way I saw it, even if I completely burned up my first pound trying to get the hang of home roasting, I was still ahead of the game.
I chose to start with Aikane Kona greens because of Tom's 2005 Kona Cupping article.  I would have started with the #1 winner Rancho Aloha, but at $20 per pound, that was a little too steep for a beginner (yes, I do have my limits).  Now that I have received my Kona greens and successfully roasted my first few batches, I will start to branch out and try other varieties.  I cannot wait to dive right in to the entire world of coffee!  I just placed an order with SM for two pounds of Sumatra Blue Batak Peaberry.  A couple months ago, I bought a pound of Blue Batak from Caribou Coffee (it was their special reserve coffee).  I loved it.  So now I'm going to try roasting it myself.
As I see it, the home roasting hobby should give me the very best of both worlds.  I get to try fantastic coffees from all over the world while only paying a small fraction of the cost I would have paid for roasted beans at my local specialty coffee shop.  How can I lose?!?!  Hee, hee... my wife is going to rue the day I discovered home roasting.  And shell never be able to complain about the money Im spending on green beans.  All Ill have to do is compare what Im spending on greens to what I COULD have spent on pre-roasted.  (But look, honey, I saved!  I thought that was important to you?!)  I'm positive this is one of my hobbies/obsessions that WILL NOT fade away!  Thank you all for contributing to this wonderful forum.  I look forward to many years of roasting and brewing bliss!
[quote title=Les wrote on Tue, 17 January 2006 11:24]I figured you would give us the scoop on the Aikane!  However, most
folks get stuck with inferior beans unless they do their homework.  I
sure am glad he nailed his roast.  It would have been a shame to see
those go to waste!  I highly suggest new roaster start with a high
quality bean that is $5.00 or less a pound.  However, I started my
homeroasting adventure with JBM at $12.00 a pound for greens in 1983. 
So maybe I am not the best person to be giving advice I didn't listen
to myself!
Les
Confession is good for the soul!
On 1/16/06, mIke mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
--
Robb W.
If only some genius could bottle a Kona Peaberry Pinot Noir.  Mmm, coffee wine...  Would that be weird?

42) From: Les
Robb you are a man after my own heart.  I love a good Kona too!  After
experiencing Carabou and Tom's Blue Batak, you are in for a real
surprise!   However, take care!, you are on the edge of a slippery
slope!  My wife smiles when I tell her I am saving money homeroasting.
 $1,000.00 espresso machines, expensive grinders.  A collection of Vac
Pots and Moka Pots.  A side business started out of homeroasting! 
Welcome, have fun and order a sample pack to really experience the
world of coffee!
Les
On 1/17/06, amyrobb  wrote:
<Snip>
And so far, I haven't burned up a single one!  It must be a combination of =
really good luck and doing my homework.  I'm having so much fun with this n=
ew-found hobby!
<Snip>
ak, especially with a topic that I really like (e.g. coffee).  Because of t=
his, I wasn't about to just jump into this home roasting thing without havi=
ng some idea of what I was doing.  I really scoured the Internet for two we=
eks before finally deciding to give it a try.  Being obsessive, I like to m=
ake sure I have everything in place and know as much as possible before I s=
tart something, just to make sure my odds of succeeding are as high as poss=
ible.  I really hate failing in anything, and I REALLY would have hated bur=
ning up some good quality Kona.  I got the majority of my roasting informat=
ion from Sweet Maria's, so kudos and thanks to everyone involved at SM.  Yo=
u really made my start in this hobby very easy!
<Snip>
eed a big gamble.  But Kona is my absolute favorite coffee, so why not star=
t with what I like?  Also, let's put this into perspective.  When I was buy=
ing roasted Kona, I was going to my local Bad Ass Coffee franchise and payi=
ng $45 per pound for 100% Kona Peaberry!!!  The first batch of Kona greens =
that I bought from Aikane Kona Co. was 3 lbs. worth at $15 per pound.  Let'=
s see, for pre-roasted Kona, 3 lbs. times $45 is $135.  For unroasted green=
s, 3 lbs. times $15 is only $45.  That's a savings of $90!  And firing up t=
he WB Poppery II that was collecting dust in my pantry cost me nothing at a=
ll.  The way I saw it, even if I completely burned up my first pound trying=
 to get the hang of home roasting, I was still ahead of the game.
<Snip>
ng article.  I would have started with the #1 winner Rancho Aloha, but at $=
20 per pound, that was a little too steep for a beginner (yes, I do have my=
 limits).  Now that I have received my Kona greens and successfully roasted=
 my first few batches, I will start to branch out and try other varieties. =
 I cannot wait to dive right in to the entire world of coffee!  I just plac=
ed an order with SM for two pounds of Sumatra Blue Batak Peaberry.  A coupl=
e months ago, I bought a pound of Blue Batak from Caribou Coffee (it was th=
eir special reserve coffee).  I loved it.  So now I'm going to try roasting=
 it myself.
<Snip>
 worlds.  I get to try fantastic coffees from all over the world while only=
 paying a small fraction of the cost I would have paid for roasted beans at=
 my local specialty coffee shop.  How can I lose?!?!  Hee, hee... my wife i=
s going to rue the day I discovered home roasting.  And she'll never be abl=
e to complain about the money I'm spending on green beans.  All I'll have t=
o do is compare what I'm spending on greens to what I COULD have spent on p=
re-roasted.  ("But look, honey, I saved!  I thought that was important to y=
ou?!")  I'm positive this is one of my hobbies/obsessions that WILL NOT fad=
e away!  Thank you all for contributing to this wonderful forum.  I look fo=
rward to many years of roasting and brewing bliss!
<Snip>
d give us the scoop on the Aikane!  However, most
<Snip>
ates
<Snip>
rom
<Snip>
his
<Snip>
a
<Snip>
with
<Snip>
ust
<Snip>
ment
<Snip>
fore.
<Snip>
 wine...  Would that be weird?
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

43) From: mIke mcKoffee
Thought I'd fan the obsessive flames a bit;-) From one KJ (Kona Junkie) to
another don't limit yourself to the Aikane! For a number of reasons. First
the Kona Cupping Competition isn't the end all be all of how a year's crop
from various Estates will be. Sometimes the highest elevation farms can't
even enter because the Competition is so early in the crop cycle. Beyond
that there's potential major variation processing batch to batch from the
same Estate same crop year. Try some other high elevation Konas! You don't
have to go as extreme as I got at one point but variety is good IMO. (peaked
at 16 different Kona greens, 63 overall different greens;-) While for
whatever reason I didn't order any from Aikane I did order some Rancho Aloha
greens. Decided to limit myself this year, only stashing 6 different Kona
greens. The Kowali greens Tom has being one (had and will have again),
compared very favorably. The Kowali actually had more acidity but was not
quite as balanced and complex as the Rancho Aloha. Haven't cupped the
Mountain Thunder yet, just roasted it today but from the smell of the roast
and post roast bean munch it may beat them both. 
Then there's the rest of the World of coffees! Highly suggest making the 8#
samplers a part of your journey. Great way to try a wide variety and at a
great price to boot. Whether you end up liking a particular green or not
getting them from Sweet Maria's at least you'll know you've tried a high
quality representative of that varietal.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

44) From: Rick Copple
amyrobb wrote:
[snip]
<Snip>
My first batch, just over a year ago, was some Costa Rican Tarrazu, my 
favorite bean at the time. Still one of my favorites, but I have so many 
now!!! I too had an old Pumper in the garage collecting dust. I wasn't 
even sure we still had it, feared we had sold it at a garage sale. But 
my wife finally found it and I had ordered some beans from Tom, I think 
about 3 pounds to try out this home roasting thing. Like you I had read 
up and it seemed simple enough...and amazingly enough, it was.
I too immediately ground up some for my press. I think the CR Tarrazu is 
a little more forgiving on the rest thing than the Kona. All I can say 
is I couldn't put the cup down...no, I couldn't even take it away from 
my lips. It was so far superior to any coffee I had ever had before in 
my life. I was blown away, literally and I knew right then I would be 
hard pressed to drink any other coffee than good quality home roasted 
coffee.
The past year has been wonderful in the coffee department. I now have a 
"stash" (though not as big as some here, big enough for me), and all 
told I've spent somewhere over the course of the past year about $150.00 
on coffee equipment. Part of that is that low because of the generosity 
of a list member. I've spent practically nil on roasting equipment 
though. I now use my wok to roast with.
I'm sure when I get my first best seller and the doe comes rolling in, 
I'll be in line for a good drum roaster and eventually a level espresso 
machine. For now, I'm good and in coffee heaven...just glad to be here!
Welcome to the wonderful world of coffee nirvana!
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TXhttp://blog.copple.us/?sectionid=5

45) From: Jared Andersson
Welcome to the list Amy or Robb?  Congrats on a good first roast.  Like the
others said if you do a little homework and are good at following direction=
s
roasting coffee is really very easy.  You and me are about 80% of the way t=
o
a perfect roast.  To get that last 20% we would need to work on roast
profiles and have the kind of experience Les has.  This is one of the thing=
s
I really have loved about home roasting.  I can start with great coffee and
know that I have a lifetime of learning and continually improving coffee.
jared
On 1/16/06, amyrobb  wrote:
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
it
<Snip>
 II
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
na
<Snip>
I
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
st
<Snip>
 on
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
e a
<Snip>
any
<Snip>
ow,
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46) From: Sandy Andina
How'd Greenwell Farms do?
On Jan 17, 2006, at 6:26 PM, mIke mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com


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