HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Alpenroaster (7 msgs / 254 lines)
1) From: Rstyler49
I plan on becoming a home roaster - only way to get fresher coffee (though I 
wish I could just buy it fresh).  Anyway, I like the Alpenroast, but have 
some reservations because me and my Brother only drink 10 oz/day.  So a 1/4 
lb. lasts us five days (I buy it by the 1/4 lb.).  From what I read it says 
it is better for 1/2 lbs., but then my coffee will be sitting for ten days.  
I can freeze it, but will ten days stale it?  I suspect that ten days of 
fresh roasted coffee will be far fresher than what I currently have access 
to.  
I do not like that I cannot SEE the coffee roasting (a minus).  Too bad they 
did not consider that when designing the unit, but perhaps they did, and you 
don't need to see it.  I mean it would be nice but maybe useless.  I don't 
know very much about roasting coffee.  
Robert

2) From: coffenut
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Robert,
 
There 
can be several reasons to buy the AlpenRost, but I'd say from your post, 
most of them won't do you much good or would suit your interests.  
Sounds like your needs line up more with the hot air-roasters (poppers, 
Fresh-Roast, Hearthware, etc).  Unless you want to give the poppers a try, 
the Fresh-Roast may be your best choice.  It's reasonably priced, cranks 
out smaller quantities and appears to be less failure prone than the 
Hearthware.
 
Tom 
does a really good job of pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of the 
roasters he sells.  To me, this was a "breath of fresh air" in a 
vendor and I highly recommend reading his plus's and minus's on each 
product. 
 
Coffenut  :^)   
 
 

3) From: Steve
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The best roaster around is the Fresh Roast. You can 
see it, hear it, time it, cool it, and it keeps on running!
It roasts enough for a pot. So just figure how 
days/pots you need and roast that many.
 
steve
 

4) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
Robert wrote:
" ... I like the Alpenroast, but have some reservations because me and my
Brother only drink 10 oz/day ..."
If you like darker roasts, may I suggest that you have a serious look at the
CR-120 Caffe Rosto?  After a LONG research, we bought one from Tom some
weeks ago and we are very happy with it.  The batch size is perfect for our
needs, and I like darker roasts with full body. We roast 100g (about 3.53
oz) batches of green beans and blend after roasting.
Regards, Lubos
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5) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
Rob wrote:
"I plan on becoming a home roaster - only way to get fresher coffee (though
I wish I could just buy it fresh).  Anyway, I like the Alpenroast, but have
some reservations because me and my Brother only drink 10 oz/day.  So a 1/4
lb. lasts us five days (I buy it by the 1/4 lb.).  From what I read it says
it is better for 1/2 lbs., but then my coffee will be sitting for ten days.
Well, then that about does it for me."
"All my life I have recognized pro equipment and purchased it.  Mostly
because of the quality of the construction and the performance.  Guess home
roasting is not for me."
Rob,
As you do, I also like well designed equipment. With all respect, I believe
that you will find out that home roasting IS for you.
There are professional roasters available. Look, for example, at the Caffe
Rosto PRO 1500. It has:
Roasting Capacity : 0.9~3.3 lbs.
Compact Size; Unit can be installed on your Counter Top
Dimensions :W15.5 x D17 x H19.3 inches
Net Weight :77 lbs
Fully Digital Operation for Perfect Roasting; Light Cinnamon to Dark French
Create your own Roasting Programs using Three Modes of Operation ..."
I believe that most professional roasting machines are too large and too
expensive for home use. However, I think that you would be happy with the
"amateur" Caffe Rosto CR-120 -- if you like darker roasts.  One batch of
roasted coffee will last you about five days. And the unit is, in my
opinion, very well designed and built.  You can see the roasting through the
glass top.
Regards, Lubos
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

6) From: Robert Cantor
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It is nice to see the roast but then a drum roaster 
would have to be made of (obviously heat resistant) glass - glass drum and glass 
top and front side to really let enough light in.  Really not a bad idea if 
it was affordable.  I'd love to beta test one if someone was going to build 
one.  None of the professional drums are like this, though.
 
The primary determinant should be taste.  The 
alp emphasizes body and depth, the HWP and its ilk emphasize brightness.  I 
know nothing about the Rosto or Kinetics roasters - those who own them have to 
do the talking!
 
You can roast less in the alp you just have to 
watch the timing more carefully.  Seconds matter even more with a small 
load.  Opening the lid to peek briefly every 2 min or so may be beneficial 
with small loads.
 
 
Bob C.
rcantor

7) From: John C.
 
<Snip>
Although I have nothing against buying the very best equipment (and have 
been guilty of doing so many times), coffee roasting is really, really, 
really dirt simple.  I believe that 98% of the results obtained in a $10K 
roaster can be achieved in a $2.00 popcorn popper, just on a smaller scale.  
I use about 20g of coffee to make my morning mug these days, and I get about 
80g per popper batch.  So one batch lasts four days.  Perfect fit for me.  
Total equipment investment - about twelve bucks.  I am sure others have 
invested even less, and probably get better results than I do.homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast


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