HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Brazil CoE (26 msgs / 525 lines)
1) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
The price at Brazil CoE is hard to even discuss without either 
laughing, or feeling deep revulsion. It has nothing to do with the 
coffee. It has to do with egos. I am against it. My philosophy is to 
stay true to the cup, and to your own interpretations of what you 
sense, and what you enjoy about coffee. I won't say that the #1 lot 
was a crap, but I will say it scored lower on my sheet than 9 others. 
#2 was much better. Many lots had very good sweetness, and were 
impressive on that account alone, but some lacked personality. I had 
my personal #1 as the lot in 13th place. I know how these CoE works - 
they rerank the top 10 in the final round and pump up the scores. So 
there is a good chance that coffees in the 11-20 range were actually 
in the top ranks until the last round, and than process involves much 
more work than one one final round of cupping by a capricious 
international jury where many of the jurors are then going to be 
bidders. The Japanese are, beside being good cuppers, very interested 
in the ranking, in the numbers. They have bought #1 for the last 5 
years. These Australians just decided to spoil that and get the media 
attention. What does this have to do with the coffee in the cup? 
Nothing.
Consider this: for the past 7 years we have been fighting nonsense 
prices for commodity coffee. Farmers can't make a living or improve 
quality with what has been paid. We left that behind, and paid prices 
unrelated to the market. Not the market is sane for base-level 
coffees. On the other extreme though, we have a different kind of 
nonsense pricing that promotes confusion for farmers and for 
consumers. It has as little to do with reality as paying .55 per lb 
for Vietnam Robusta. It is not sustainable, nobody benefits except in 
terms of marketing.
I'm just not down with this - I believe in premium prices based on 
the extra work farmers and mills have to invest in good coffee. I 
think there should be a quality premium that includes future 
improvements, benefits for workers (better 
schools/healthcare/pay/etc) and a reasonable profit for the farm 
owner. This Brazil thing has just been distracting.
Tom
BTW: I think Gant was just confused on his terms there... As far as 
the clover, it makes a lot of sense. We have a new brewer we are 
offering called the aeropress. I like the results, but Maria is put 
off by the company (aerobie, the  weird frisbee people), and I am a 
bit put off by the claims they make (it is NOT an espresso maker). 
It's basically a great 1 cup press method that produces a very, very 
clean cup, and can be used to make a concentrate. I used it traveling 
and really liked it and it does not strictly require 200 degree water 
- it actually works good at 175-180, surprisingly. Anyway, if you 
ignore the package ("smoothest, richest, purest, fastest" - I hate 
claims like that) it actually does work very well.
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

2) From: Thbull
Tom,
Being new to roasting, and having been direct to SM in the fall, I
really appreciate your comments and opinions, and the fact that you
are very concerned about the coffee/farmers/workers/farms and that you
say so.
Thanks for talking out!!!
-Arron
On 1/26/06, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

3) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/26/06, Thbull  wrote:
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Hey, guess what...!  You can help them out, too, via a small donation at:
www.coffeekids.com
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

4) From: Walter R. Basil
I had my first roasting of the Brazil CoE. I did the first batch to a  
FC+ and it was very full flavored. Last night I roasted one to C+ as  
Tom suggests. Like he said, it doesn't look pretty. I'll see what it  
tastes like tonight or tomorrow.
--
Walter R Basil
www.basilweb.net

5) From: Woody DeCasere
the #5 or the #13 ??
On 5/10/06, Walter R. Basil  wrote:
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--
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

6) From: Jason Brooks
I'm still nursing a CoE13 - Nazareth Dia Pereira, roasted to City+ on the
7th.  Brewed this morning in the Chemex.  Off to work in my Nisan Thermos
16oz, a bit cool now, but sweet and smooth.  Good stuff.
Jason
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-- 
Jason Brooks
jbrookshttp://members.kinex.net/~jbrooks/blog/blog.html-----------------------------------------
This email was sent using Kinex WebMail.
   "Webmail for the World!"http://www.kinex.net/

7) From: Reed Taylor
Hi Walter -
I just finished off my first 200g of the Brazil CoE #13, which I had
roasted to FC because I was too scared of the appearance at C+ (in spite
of Tom's assurances).  I liked the results at FC, but it seemed like I
had maybe smoothed out a good bit of the varietal character.
I'm still a relative newbie.  I had originally planned to stop my roast
at C+, but I was biting my nails because many beans were so
non-uniform.  They still had lighter-colored, "poofy" patches, which
reminded me too much of a "C-" Kona roast I once made, which could
charitably be described as "yucky."  It was my first real error in the
trial-and-error process.
Since then, I've been a little gun-shy about roasting lighter than FC,
though I realize I need to get over my fears.  So I'm steeling my nerves
so as to run an ugly C+ batch of the CoE#13 tonight, my misgivings
notwithstanding.
So, I'll be very interested to hear what you think of the C+ batch!
Could you describe the appearance of these beans at C+?
Thanks,
Reed
Walter R. Basil wrote:
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8) From: James House
Man I am just the opposite.  I just started roasting and I think I
under-roasted some Malabar Gold (very light and non uniform, not too far ou=
t
of 1st crack) as well as some sumatra, that at day 3-4 I have to choke
down.  However my Kenya AA which I pulled at C+ was pretty good.
I havent tried the MG yet though.  Was letting it rest a little longer for
some espresso.
On 5/10/06, Reed Taylor  wrote:
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9) From: Reed Taylor
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I know just where you're at.  That Kona I pulled too soon gave me a case 
of Cityplusophobia.  (In truth, I think that Kona was only about a third 
of the way through first crack.)
But I'm trying to confront my fears.  After that early mistake, I would 
almost always decide to play it safe and wait until the first snaps of 
second crack. This resulted in some really tasty FC+ roasts, but in most 
cases I would only pick up the varietal characteristics that Tom was 
mentioning as a background note, and only when the cup had cooled off 
quite a bit. 
Since then, I've gotten pretty good at recognizing and stopping ahead of 
second crack in a solid FC, and I guess I'm working my way backwards.
There was a comment earlier today about how having too much variety 
(i.e. a dozen one-pound bags) can make it really hard to learn... I 
totally agree with this.  Having a decent-sized pile of one thing 
(Brazil CoE#13 in this case) helps me to want to push myself into new 
territory, since I don't feel like I have only 3 attempts with each 
coffee before the beans are all gone.
Reed
James House wrote:
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10) From: Steve Hay
On 5/10/06, Reed Taylor  wrote:
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I've had similar experiences with coffee at City+.  Specifically, I remembe=
r
the Bolivia Montana Peaberry having a rather flat and sour flavor at C+.  I
recently picked up the rest of that bag and have been roasting it at FC+ to
Vienna and I like it a bit more, although I'm definitely blasting through
some origin complexity.  I wonder sometimes if the iRoast2 roasts fast
enough that its hard to get a nice even C+ roast.  Still, I have had pretty
good success with the Harar I currently have.  Some sat overnight and in th=
e
morning it tasted like milk chocolate..  Fresh, it was Blueberries.
Amazing.
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

11) From: James House
Yeah I agree, I am about to settle into 2-3 greens max and get a handle on
them, roasting into various profiles and trying at different rest periods.
On 5/10/06, Reed Taylor  wrote:
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12) From: Steve Hay
On 5/10/06, James House  wrote:
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FWIW, I've found that about 10 pounds is about what I need to really feel
like I've explored a bean and am ready to move on.  I tend to do two batche=
s
at a time, so I guess that would translate to about 5 pounds equivalent.
Much less than that and I feel longing for more roasting experience.  That
said there have been a few that I kinda got tired of after the first
pound..  Like the Sumatra Timtim Blangili Longberry (did I get that right?)
which was a bit too much (I think it was) Sorghum for my tastes..  Kind of
mediciny syrup..  It would probably be good at the 10% levels or so in
blends.  I've been holding of on blending because SO has been so much fun..
Plus, SO is where its at anyway, isn't it?  Who drinks a Johnny Walker when
you can have Macallan?
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

13) From: Ed Needham
Malabar Gold is a blend of several types of beans, including Indian 
Monsooned Malabar and is not likely to roast evenly.  Sumatra is sometimes 
ugly as heck and looks like it's not roasted evenly but tastes wonderful. 
I'd roast  Sumatra at least FC.  Many Kenyas will be great at a lighter 
roast  but can be a bit citrusy or overly bright if roasted too light.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

14) From: Les
Interesting to see the newbies struggle!  Experience will build
confidence.  Remember even your screwups are going to be better than
what 90% of America is drinking!
Les
On 5/10/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
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15) From: Ed Needham
Been homeroasting for 30 years and still feel stupid at times.
If I'm not a 'newbie' at something almost every day, then I'm not trying 
very hard.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

16) From: Woody DeCasere
On 5/10/06, Les  wrote:
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I totally agree, i don't consider myself a roast master or anything close,
and sure i screw up the occasional batch, but even my bad batches are
awesome in  comparison. Enjoy your roasting experience, don't worry about
perfection, you will never achieve it, but great coffee you will, for me
it's a holistic experience, i buy the greens, i drool over which to roast, =
i
roast (sometimes poorly), i brew and drink and i am glad!
Woody
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

17) From: Walter R. Basil
On May 10, 2006, at 12:59 PM, "Woody DeCasere"   
wrote:
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The #13. Had a cup of it tonight. I'm not one to tell what it tastes  
like. Plum, raisin, bright, I have no clue. I can tell the chocolate  
taste, but that's about it. If I had to choose a word, I'd say earthy  
for this one. I liked it.
--
Walter R Basil
www.basilweb.net

18) From: Walter R. Basil
On May 10, 2006, at 8:52 PM, Reed Taylor  wrote:
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I under-roasted some Kona. My first batch of kona actually. I had  
just been scared by a batch of Kenya (turns out I don't like that  
one) and this Kona was making me worry a bit. I through the remainder  
of the beans back in the roaster for a few more minutes, and this was  
about a day later. Turned out pretty good. Much better than just  
throwing it away!
My advice on some under-roasted coffee is to heat it up again. YMMV.
--
Walter R Basil
www.basilweb.net

19) From: James House
Yeah I messed up my MM and my Sumatra, C/C+ and not good to my taste.
However my Kenya AA, which was my first roast ever, I stopped between C+ an=
d
FC, and it is great!  Just got through having a cup of it from my ibrik,
wonderful.  So that gave me some confidence that I just might be able to do
this.  :)
On 5/10/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
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20) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 5/11/06, James House  wrote:
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How is your ibrik brewing coming? I'd be interested in hearing how
your process has evolved, and how you are "ibriking" now.
Thanks,
Brian
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21) From: Jeffrey Bair
I did the same thing with a batch of Yemen once - I freaked out and thought
it was in second when it was just quiet first and ejected WAY too early. Pu=
t
it back in the roaster the next day to finish up and it was probably the
best batch of Yemen I ever roasted!
Jeff
On 5/10/06, Walter R. Basil  wrote:
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22) From: James House
You can throw back on the roaster?  I had no idea.....
On 5/11/06, Jeffrey Bair  wrote:
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23) From: Don Cummings
I am skeptical about this but I can't even make it throught this tasting cu=
p
of Santa Adelaida. It is horrible.  I might as well give it a try because i=
t
certainly can't get worse.  Well, it could, but who cares since it is
garbage as it stands.
Don
On 5/12/06, James House  wrote:
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24) From: Don Cummings
Update:
I threw the SA back in the roaster for a couple of minutes. Interesting.
Seemed like it just picked up where I left off yesterday.  After a couple o=
f
minutes I started hearing 2nd crack-like pops.  I gave it a few more second=
s
and voila! Now it *looks* like FC.  Time will tell.
I'm serious though. That funky flavor I got from the City - roast was so
pervasive that I had to brush my teeth again to get it out of my mouth.
Yuck!
Don

25) From: Jeffrey Bair
In fact, if I recall an earlier discussion on this topic some months ago,
there is a commercial roaster somewhere out west that actually double roast=
s
several of his coffees before sale. I imagine it's a gimmick as much as a
technique, but it worked for me. Only tried that once, though - not my
preferred method : )
J.
On 5/12/06, Don Cummings  wrote:
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26) From: Larry English
Double roasts can work with some roasters.  I had a batch of Yemen "spoiled=
"
when one of the heating elements of my 1st iRoast2 stopped heating at the
3:00 mark - very pale tan roast!  While waiting for the replacement iRoast2
(thanks to Maria!) I decided to continue the roast with my FreshRoast - and
got a wonderful, though not repeatable, batch of coffee!  That might not
work with the iRoast2 itself, since that roaster insists on controlling the
first 3 minutes before responding to a program.  With the FreshRoast I coul=
d
control the roast much better.  Not sure why someone would do this as a
standard practice, though.
Larry
On 5/12/06, Jeffrey Bair  wrote:
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