HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Aeropress (83 msgs / 2182 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Bill Morgan
After reading Tom's notes and the Coffeegeeks thread, this device
looks extremely interesting.  I've been learning lately that my mouth
doesn't much like "bright" flavors, so the Aeropress sounds like my
kinda gadget.
Looking at the pictures, I'd guess that a weak spot in the design
could be the seal between the plunger and the main body.  In one of
the Coffeegeek messages, the inventor claims 500 uses on one device
with no visible wear and seems to imply that the seal is replaceable. 
Does that seem to be true?
Tom, I understand and appreciate your need to evaluate the thing fully
and provide a complete description on your site, and I know that takes
time.  We here on the list have heard your reservations and I suspect
that I'm not the only one who has already decided to buy one as soon
as you offer them.  How about a preview deal for the list denizens?
Thanks for all you hard work on our behalf.
Bill

4) From: Lissa
On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 14:57:35 -0600, Bill Morgan wrote
<Snip>
I've only had mine less than a week, but it is a pretty big plug of solid,
heavy  rubber. I don't know if the seal is replaceable, but I don't think it
will be a problem.
IANAE (I am not an engineer).
Be well,
Lissa

5) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
What's the cleanup like?  Thanks
--
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary
On 2/4/06, Lissa  wrote:
<Snip>
,
<Snip>

6) From: Turbosimba
If you do it right, cleanup is a breeze. The grounds are like an espresso  
puck, hard and pretty dry. So you just use the plunger like a hypodermic syringe 
 and expel the grounds into the garbage disposal, trash, etc. Of course you 
have  to remove the filter and basket first. Rinse out the plunger, brewer, 
filter  basket, and you're done. Much less mess than a French press
Jeff

7) From: Turbosimba
I dunno, I think it is bright flavored coffee, but when the directions are  
followed, there is a mellowness and sweetness to the cup. I used a pure Yemen  
Mokha this morning and it was about as good as a cup of American roasted  
coffee can get.  All the fruit flavors were intact and it was so sweet, it  
reminded me of fruit juice. 
Jeff

8) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Just arrived with 12-2 lbs of beans.  Checked the hot water from my tap 
on the faema; in cup its @ 200. Ground my standard dose of coffee, but @ 
27 - 20 higher than espresso for my Rocky. Pretty std press pot taste. 
No sludge.
Next cup. looked up Tom's instructions, followed them. Ground @ 17. This 
cup is as good as (on the high side) as the americanos I make with my 
Faema.
I'm impressed!
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

9) From: Bill Morgan
Replying to myself here for the sake of the archives:
The seal on the plunger is very, very easy to remove and replace, so
it will be no problem at all, assuming that the manufacturer offers a
reasonable price on replacement parts.
On 2/4/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Hot Coffee
Question: To make four cups, all the concentrate goes into one cup and than 
you pour four equal portions of concentrate into four cups  Is that the way 
it works
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11) From: Jason Molinari
yes, then dilute with hot water.
I've found it impossible to make more than 3 cups when
using fresh cofee because of the bloom!!
Boy does it make good coffee though..
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12) From: Hot Coffee
I got my at noon today and had three cups and want more but I think I better 
wait.  It was great with my solis but I tried it with a whirley blade and it 
was flat or weak.  Just curious.
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13) From: Scjgb3
i just received my aeropress today and have already put it to the test, a  
wonderful cup of Selva Negra.  i was sold on the swissgold one cupper and  
really thought (what i get for thinking) that, that was the one for me but i was  
wrong. the aeropress produced a much smoother cup using the instructions from  
SM. to those who said i should try it, THANK YOU!
 
happy brewing to you and yours
joel

14) From: Hot Coffee
My aeropress is losing its press.  When I put a new filter in the 
plungergoes down with nio resistence for an inch or more and only creates 
pressure for the last half ofthe plunge but ifthe filter is used then there 
is more back pressure.  This is not how it started out.  There was pressure 
during the whole plunge.
John Fellowes
Gibsons B.C.
Say hello to the next generation of Search. Live Search – try it now. http://www.live.com/?mkt=en-ca

15) From: Scott Marquardt
I noticed your remark the other day, but had little to say in reply. After
Saturday, though, I have to add that most useful of responses -- the classi=
c
"Me too!"  ;-)
Saturday at the market I was serving Aerobrews, as usual, and a couple of
them "coughed" back at me! Bloom spurted around the seal in the plunger, up
the column, and browed my hand and wrist. Weird! That's a first.
I suspect I was holding the plunger slightly off-axis with respect to the
column, presenting an elliptical surface on the horizontal (the plunger) to
an what would then be an elliptical surface on the vertical (the column
walls). That's a doubly exaggerated warpage to surface contact.
BUT -- I'm sure I've done as much before. So I suspect I'm beginning to see
what you're seeing -- some dimensional change in the plunger or column (the
boolean there allows for both, as well ;-)  that's causing both your
experience and mine.
Unfortunately, I can't discriminate between the plunger and the column on
age and number of uses, since I have several Aeros and their parts get mixe=
d
up regularly.
Anyone else?
- Scott
On 10/13/06, Hot Coffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Scott

16) From: Steve Hay
On 10/15/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
Not yet, but I've suspected as much might happen.. It seems like the fit is
pretty tight in there that something like this might happen.
Mine is, however, starting to leak ever so slightly through the seal between
the black plastic filter tray and the aeropress body.  Not enough to cause
problems though, and usually only after I start pushing air through the
grounds.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

17) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
yes, another aeropress thread!
got one for christmas, and it cracks me up every time i use it..  :)
it makes such a clean cup of coffee, im not even using milk most of the
time!
but, thats part of the problem. i think its too clean.no oils, no depth of
flavor.
 
is this from the paper filter? is this why some use a polyester filter?  can
anyone give me more info on this, if im heading in the right direction?  i
wonder, rather than a filter, wouldnt making a metal espresso machine type
bottom work?  it looks like a basket would sit in the black piece perfectly
if you cut it.. but then, you wouldnt get to 'eject the puck'. hehehehe

18) From:
Leo:
I guess I would suggest you use a larger amount of ground coffee? What have you been using to make coffee with before the areopress?
ginny
---- Leo Zick  wrote: 
<Snip>

19) From: Scott Marquardt
Well, you shoulda been payin' attention in those other threads.   ;-)
As for depth of flavor, try using hotter water and a lot more of it when
brewing. Brew longer and/or grind finer if necessary. Control the variables
yourself (don't rely on the instructions, pace Alan) and you'll find the
Aero to be a wonderful servant of great coffee.
As for dirtier coffee, yes, polyester solves that problem. Metal does too --
but with much more introduction of fines, unless cake extraction is used
much in the way you suggest (the Aero thread at CG just featured a post with
this illustrated, using a portafilter basket).
I'd suggest you parse out the last few pages of the Aero thread there to
glean more information. My most recent post in the thread lays out which
methods and techniques yield which cup results (for poly).
I vary my method and technique a lot, enjoying pretty much every variation.
I don't use paper for my own coffee, though.
E-mail me your address if you'd like a sample of the poly.
- Scott
On 1/2/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Justin Schwarz
--Apple-Mail-1-604278686
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On Jan 2, 2007, at 5:19 AM, Leo Zick wrote:
<Snip>
 From my experimentation with this I would not advise, it was a fun  
project though.
There are actually very few fines, But I haven't been able to get a  
drinkable cup from this.  A tamped PF basket is problematic because  
you cannot get the correct pressure needed to infuse a puck and I  
have yet to find a decent way to diffuse water inside the AP.   I  
gave up trying to make the thing into a poor man's espresso machine  
and used the filter basket simply as a metal screen, but even that  
doesn't com anywhere near the results I get using  invert AP W/ 
Polyester.
If anyone does want to try mutilating their AP, Aerobie does have  
replacement screens available for $5 which includes shipping.
Justin Schwarz
houstini
If there is anything worth doing, it's worth doing right.
--Apple-Mail-1-604278686
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On Jan 2, 2007, at =
5:19 AM, Leo Zick wrote:

From my experimentation = with this I would not advise, it was a fun project = though.  
There are actually very few = fines, But I haven't been able to get a drinkable cup from this.  A tamped PF basket is problematic because you = cannot get the correct pressure needed to infuse a puck and I have yet = to find a decent way to diffuse water inside the AP.   I gave up = trying to make the thing into a poor man's espresso machine and used the = filter basket simply as a metal screen, but even that doesn't com = anywhere near the results I get using  invert AP = W/Polyester. 
If anyone does want to try = mutilating their AP, Aerobie does have replacement screens available for = $5 which includes shipping.
Justin = Schwarzhoustini
If there is anything worth = doing, it's worth doing right.

= --Apple-Mail-1-604278686--

21) From: Scott Marquardt
Interesting. As I understand it, though, you were just covering the puck
area -- not really having anything against the top of the grind to keep it
in place and compact. No?
The method I used as mentioned at CG worked great -- too great, really. Alan
repeated my effort and actually got 25% extraction out of it.
I think you just need to have something that keeps the grind compact. I have
no idea how to think about tamp or anything like that just yet.
I still like your idea. Don't give up!
- Scott
On 1/3/07, Justin Schwarz  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Jason Sheldon
I picked up an aeropress the other day. Wow, I'm really impressed.  I
was a die hard press pot person.  I think I'm going to pack the press
put up.  The only problem with it is that everyone at work calls it my
Swedish Coffee Pump.  I tell them, "That's not my bag, baby".
In other news, a coworker ordered an iRoast2.  I have converted
another to the Dark side.  Not too dark, more to the C+ to FC+ side.
Jason

23) From: Brandon Kolbe
I agree.  The aeropress makes a really good cup.  I keep mine at work during
the week.  I take fresh ground coffee each morning so I can make a cup at
work.  It is quick and oooooh sooooo goooood!!  Besides the great cup it
makes I really like how easy it is to clean up.
Brandon
On 3/1/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"We are what we think.
All that we are arises
With our thoughts.
With our thoughts,
We make our world."
       -- Buddha

24) From: Scott Marquardt
On 3/1/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm convinced that I've freaked out a few people at work. The
"Aeromess" (coffee mess) is free to all, but only a handful of us use
it. A few people have spotted me making coffee almost on autopilot.
The series of operations is brainless to perform:
1. Enter kitchenette, remove bag from freezer, remove poly from bag
and place in Aero cap.
2. Fill inverted Aero about half with water from the Bunn hot water spigot.
3. Measure and grind beans.
4. Pour all water from Aero through the frozen poly in the cap, into the cup.
5. Add a half inch of hot water to the inverted Aero, then grind, then
more water.
6. Stir the slurry away from the sides, agitate, add as much water as possible.
7. Cap the column, press inverted at an angle over cup to get oils, then revert.
8. Backflush with air a bit, then finish the press in normal orientation.
9. Twist off the cap and pop the puck into the trash with one-hand.
10. Rinse the poly and everything else.
11. Park the filter back in the freezer, top off the cup, and go back to office.
Those eleven steps I could perform in my sleep. It's automatic. Above
all, it's FAST.
The most important discovery I recently made was that the rapidity of
the extraction is not so much a tribute to under-extraction as to puck
extraction. Aeropress coffee isn't as under-extracted as early
experiences of many with the device led a lot of folks to conclude.
A good hard press will result in very efficient extraction during puck
formation in the bottom of the Aero.
- S

25) From: Sandra Andina
--Apple-Mail-17--867083470
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I have had more than one person express surprise on occasion that at  
my age I would still be using a breast milk pump.  It DOES look  
disturbingly similar to one, however!
On Mar 1, 2007, at 8:27 PM, Jason Sheldon wrote:
<Snip>
Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-17--867083470
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I have had more than one person =
express surprise on occasion that at my age I would still be using a =
breast milk pump.  It DOES look disturbingly similar to one, =
however!
On Mar 1, 2007, at 8:27 PM, Jason Sheldon =
wrote:

The only = problem with it is that everyone at work calls it my

Swedish Coffee = Pump.

Sandra = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-17--867083470--

26) From: Brett Mason
Sandy, you think they ask YOU questions.....  Imagine being a guy and
facing the same scrutiny....
Brett
  RWA
P.S. OK, so I don't actually have a coffee-breast pump, but he image
is equally frightening....
On 3/2/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

27) From: Scott Marquardt
Aaargh! see key correction, below:
On 3/1/07, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
6.5  Toss the water out of the cup.
<Snip>
Mea culpa.
- S

28) From: Casey Jones
I'm constanly harrassed by my co-workers about the appearance of the
AP.  Mind you, they are mostly single men in their 20's.
I keep waiting for the day when my carry-on is randomly selected by
TSA.  I can just imagine the agent removing it from my bag and
announcing to the crowd "And sir, what exactly is THIS for?"
-Casey
On 3/2/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Mejia, Carlos
Scott,
Can you explain your process a little more and how you came up with it?
I just bought an Aeropress and I'm just following the process that came
with it.  By 'frozen poly in the cap' ... do you mean, put the paper
filter in?  Why do you keep it in the freezer?  Are you running water
through the filter first for some reason?  Also, why are you pressing at
an angle?  
I love the results I'm getting but the two scoops of beans for one 6 oz
cup seems like a lot of coffee!  Also, ground at the mid level on my
grinder it takes a LOT of pressure to finish the cycle...maybe I'm not
grinding coarse enough. How much coffee are you using for what size cup
and how coarse is your grind?
~carlos
On 3/1/07, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
the cup.
<Snip>
<Snip>
possible.
6.5  Toss the water out of the cup.
<Snip>
then revert.
Mea culpa.
- S

30) From: Jason Sheldon
I'm still confused...
So put the plunger in it and stand it up with the plunger on the
bottom.  Put in coffee and water.  stir.  put the filter and cap on.
let it steep.  flip it over and press.
Is that right?  the advantage here is the coffee has more time to steep.
Thanks,
Jason
On 3/2/07, David Echelbarger  wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: Brett Mason
And if you're feeling swollen, you can do some double duty...
Just came to help,
Brett
  RWA
On 3/2/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

32) From: Scott Marquardt
On 3/2/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
<Snip>
Not really.
I'm not sure what Imbibe believes the advantage is, if they're not
doing any of the actual press inverted. Avoidance of wash-through? If
the grind is fine enough to make for a brief press, that's not a
problem. Why grind coarser? To steep longer? That makes no sense
either, because grinding finer, one doesn't need more time.
There's no point in steeping longer if the grind is fine enough -- one
would over-extract. I'll add that I think some brewing advice on a lot
of sites is irresponsible if it doesn't mention that steep duration
(regardless of method) is utterly dependent on the fineness of the
grind. It is, and for sites to talk about 4 minutes all the time as if
it were some kind of universally applicable figure, irrespective of
grind, is nuts.
I advocate inversion for specific purposes, but I remain mystified by
some applications of the method. Still, it shows the versatility of
the device -- you can tweak variables and resolve difficulties in
diverse ways.
- Scott

33) From: Scott Marquardt
On 3/2/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>
Right. A good starting point, but then add to that your own brewing
experience and you'll do even better. Think about each variable, and
modify them one at a time. Vary them MORE than you think necessary, so
you can see more obviously what the effect is of such variations.
You'll strike the happy medians before long.
Generally, selecting a good grind level is the first thing. For the
Aero, I'd suggest a conventional orientation (sitting on a cup as
normal) with paper, and put in one scoop of beans, ground. Add 6 oz of
hot water (200 degrees) and stir vigorously for 20 to 30 seconds. Look
in the cup -- there should be about a tablespoon of coffee, perhaps
two. That's a good starting place for a grind.
<Snip>
I'm using 5 micron [nominal] polyester felt, rather than paper. The
point of inversion is to press some oils through; they tend to
accumulate in the bloom, which with a normal Aeropress technique ends
up with 'em filtered through the puck. Pressing a bit of the slurry in
an inverted orientation gets the bloom through the filter first, then
the press can continue and finish in a conventional orientation.
I used to press a bit totally upside down and quickly turn it over the
cup before things spill; I've fell to inverted pressing while holding
the thing in my hands, about 20 degrees from vertical and over the
cup. I don't spill a drop and the effect is the same with regard to
oils.
One problem with the inverted method is that "doubles" are difficult
-- the column loses about an inch and a half to the plunger, which
could otherwise be used for water.
Trick: if you're going for normal strength coffee, use as much water
in the Aeropress as you can. You can do 6 oz. cups easily without
adding any water after pressing.
<Snip>
Yikes no. One Aeroscoop of whole bean (level) is actually a gram or
two too much for a 6 oz brew (which should yield about 5.7 ounces of
coffee). If you grind an average good Aero grind directly into the
scoop (as opposed to scooping coffee from a container of grind) and
scrape-level it, you're likely to have darned close to an even 10
grams. Whole bean is likely to average 2 to 4 grams more.
I use a drip grind on an SMP. You can go a few clicks either way from
that and do fine, just adapting your variables as needed. At work I
use a whirly and, to avoid heterogenous grind and the entailed broad
extraction profile, I grind very fine -- much finer than at home with
the SMP. I simply have to ensure that the extraction is either
briefer, less efficient, or both.
Don't press too hard and the press might go more quickly for you. Or
yeah, go coarser. But let the quality of the cup -- extraction depth
-- be your principal feedback to tweak your method.

34) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
So would Austin be using it?
ROFL!!!!!
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
Safety Dept 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean 
 "On station and on point 84 and counting down..." 
 
 
 
On Mar 1, 2007, at 8:27 PM, Jason Sheldon wrote:
		The only problem with it is that everyone at work calls
it my
		Swedish Coffee Pump.
	
	Sandra Andina
	www.sandyandina.com

35) From: Mejia, Carlos
Scott said...
"I'm using 5 micron [nominal] polyester felt, rather than paper."
Do you feel there's an advantage of this type of filter over paper?
Where do you get them?  Do you buy the material and cut it round?  How
many uses do you get with them?
Scott said...
"If you grind an average good Aero grind directly into the
scoop (as opposed to scooping coffee from a container of grind)..."
Unfortunately, my burr grinder can't grind into the scoop as it would
throw coffee grinds all over the counter!  So, I need to either measure
the whole beans or scoop the grind out of the container of my grinder.
Sounds like the amt of ground coffee should be about 2 Tablespoons
(heaping?) for the full ~6oz of Aeropress.  Does this sound right?
Actually, my preferred drink is a 'grande' (~10-12 oz) Americano with
room for a splash of half/half.  Can anyone suggest a process for
extracting the proper strength of coffee to add about 4 oz of water and
end up with a good strong grande Americano?
This is a great discussion!  I've learned a lot about my Aeropress that
I didn't know.  I didn't know about the inverted method.  Does anyone
have a blog or know of a good website with pictures or videos showing
this and maybe other methods of the Aeropress?

36) From: Scott Marquardt
On 3/4/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>
Advantages include:
1. Faster throughput, allowing a wider latitude for brewing variable control.
For example, I can use a finer grind if I'm interested in a very fast
brewing cycle or if, perhaps, my grinder is inconsistent at a
relatively coarser grind. No risk of stall with finer grind gives me
room to solve problems and dial in my preferences.
The Aeropress already offers a lot of control over brewing variables.
This means that innovations in its use can take advantage of that by
constraining those variables somewhat. One's method can be limiting in
some way without making proper extraction too difficult. In the case
of using polyester felt, though, the latitude is widened. This
increases the range of choices for variable constraint that one might
adopt. A bit of an arcane philosophical point, I admit.   ;-)
2. Oil permeability.
Paper generally stops oils. This kind of material doesn't.
Some discussion of (1) and (2) together: Anyone trying a press with
poly felt in order to get oils in the cup may be discouraged on two
fronts. First, the fast throughput makes conventional use of an Aero
difficult; there's a lot of wash-through. Grinding finer resolves that
problem, but still won't produce oils in the cup. The reason for this
is that the oils are generally suspended in the bloom of the slurry.
They're near the top of the extraction column during brewing. Stir as
you will, that's where they'll be when you go to press. As you press,
a puck begins to form at the bottom of the column. The closer the
surface of the slurry gets to this puck, the more grind the puck
assimilates and the tighter the puck becomes. This increases
extraction efficiency quite a bit; the pressing operation results in
extraction disproportionately greater than its duration alone would
warrant. But what's sthe last thing to enter the puck? The bloom, and
its suspended oils. The puck captures them and they never make it into
the cup.
With that in mind, to capture the advantages of poly, one has to use
the inverted method. This allows you to use grind of any coarseness
you wish, because there's no wash-through at all. And it allows you to
press the bloom through the filter first, so that all oils make it
into the cup. This can result in a ridiculous amount of oils.http://coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/268272#268272What's sacrificed in the inverted method? First, you can't use as much
water. I advocate abandoning the instructions for the device when it
comes to the amount of water to use. Use as much as possible. The
inverted method robs you of an inch or two of headroom that could
otherwise be water. Second, although the device is stable in the
inverted position, the center of gravity is higher, it's not locked
onto the top of a cup, and it's statistically almost certain that
regardless of the care you exercise, the day will come when you have
your first messy spill -- and it could be an uncomfortably hot one if
it spills in the direction of your person. It hasn't happened to me
quite yet, though I've had a couple filter mishaps that wouldn't have
happened with normal orientation use of the Aero.
3. Complete control over cup character.
Clear, no oil: paper filtering
Clear, oil: puck extraction with poly
Turbid, little oil: poly extraction, normal orientation (dirtier using
plunger pump method)
Turbid, oil: poly extraction, inverted orientation
Very turbid, oil: poly extraction, inverted orientation, plunger pump
method to break up puck during press
<Snip>
I obtained some sample material from a couple suppliers. I intend to
sell rounds of it eventually, but not until I obtain material from a
supplier who can certify the stuff's pedigree all the way back to vats
of goo; however pure such material appears, I want it to be FDA-happy.
Having said that, the sample material I obtained is very clean and
you're welcome to some; e-mail me your addy.
I obtained a die to cut the material -- a manual process but the
quality is high. I wish I could afford a process which would work,
which would make it unnecessary to file the Aeropress cap. I know what
I'd need to do, but geez -- the costs.
The rule of thumb for such material's lifetime -- presuming it's
cleaned as best as possible and is kept in the freezer between uses --
is that once its throughput begins to slow noticeably, it's time to
chuck it. That's because of buildup of very fine particles in the
depth of the felt. Different cleaning techniques can ameliorate or
exacerbate this.
I find that a filter at work lasts me all week -- about 15 cups worth.
It would probably last longer, but I've opted to just let Fridays be
"chuck the filter" day.
The one at home lasts forever, because it only sees Saturday duty (I
get a Sunday's worth at church, where I brew in quantity).
<Snip>
How you measure isn't important, so long as you can measure
consistently. I mention the distinctions dependent on method because
it's important for such conversations to reduce to actual weight of
grind. If you don't have a small, accurate gram scale yet, put it on
your short list. Even if you're content with your extractions, the
most valuable imaginable thing for coffee conversations is to be able
to specify how much coffee you use in a universally repeatable unit of
measure. Volume is inherently problematic for communicating amounts. I
never have any idea what anyone's talking about when they speak of
tablespoons -- and that's rightly so because one finds that people
vary widely in what they mean when they use that term! When someone
speaks of grams, there's no doubt at all about the amount of coffee in
question.
Not that one needs to know the amount in grams to make good coffee.
But to advise someone when a technique works for oneself, it can get a
bit crazy if fundamentals like the actual amount of coffee are not
certainly nailed down.
With that said, I'd say "experiment." My concern is that no one should
imagine that the Aeropress inherently uses more coffee than other
brewing methods. Perhaps it does if instructions for the device are
followed, but I've insisted in forums where this issue has been raised
that it's not really sane for coffee geeks who participate in such
forums to let a manufacturer's method be the last word on how an
innovative device is used. The value of an innovative device doesn't
end with how its inventor conceived of its use; it begins once a
thousand more inventive people get their hands on it and abandon the
instructions.   ;-)
<Snip>
I'm probably the method's most enthusiastic advocate where it's used
with polyester (some, as I mentioned elsewhere, use it just to avoid
wash-through -- an approach I consider ill-advised because they should
be using enough more water that a bit of wash-through wouldn't matter;
or they need to grind finer), but ironically others have posted better
pictorials than I (no links on hand, sorry). My descriptions are far
too verbose and, alas, already in need of much editing. But it might
help you:
I'm switching my google pages over to my domain, but I broke the full
size pictures in the process. First try:http://scott.marquardt.googlepages.com/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffeeOnce you've explored others' approaches, carve out some exporatory">http://marquardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.htmland if you need full-size images of the embedded shots, go here instead:http://scott.marquardt.googlepages.com/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffeeOnce you've explored others' approaches, carve out some exporatory
territory of your own. Have fun!   :-)
- Scott

37) From: Bill Zambon
Do you mean that the AeroPress can also be used to make coffee?
Well I'll be darned.
Big Bill Z

38) From: Brett Mason
Doubles the pleasure, boggles the mind!
Brett
On 4/8/07, Bill Zambon  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

39) From: Michael Mccandless
Gives a whole new meaning to "bloom".
McSparky
On 4/8/07, Bill Zambon  wrote:
<Snip>

40) From: Scott Marquardt
On 6/24/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
The inverted method is two things. First, it's a method of dealing
with "wash-though" -- cases where an Aeropress's fill of water
migrates through the filter during stirring much faster than a user
might wish. IMO, use of inversion in such a case is bailing out of the
process of dialing in one's grind. One shouldn't resort to inversion
without having first done one's due diligence with the grind.
The second point of inversion is to get coffee oils in the cup. IMO,
use of good polyester felt (5 micron) is necessary to make this
worthwhile. Some have reported good results with paper, which I still
find surprising. However, it's surprising in the direction of the
common sense which rationalizes the technique.
The bloom in an Aeropress suspends much of the oils, which migrate to
the surface of the extraction slurry. This migration ensures two
things. First, that conventional extraction in an Aeropress will
result in the oils being pressed through the resultant puck last,
never making it to the cup. Second, that inverted extraction in an
Aero will give those same oils a chance to make it through the filter
first -- especially if the filter media is of a kind that's pleased to
pass those oils.
The idea is to begin the press fairly inverted (60 degree angle or
so), pressing upwards but allowing the flow to roll off the side of
the cap/bayo area into the cup -- then "re-verting" the Aero once the
bloom has been pressed through, finishing the press in conventional
fashion.
[Aside: there's a noticeable difference between a dark and a light
roast's blooms: namely, the light roast -- having volatilized less of
the lighter molecular weight oils present in the bean -- produces a
more durable bloom. The darker roast generates a frothy, easily
collapsed bloom.]
The downside of inversion is that in inverted Aero is a risky thing on
a countertop; it's easy to bump it and make a mess. Although I've only
done this once among hundreds of inversions, it's a real risk.
Again, IMO paper media is not ideally suited to inversion if the
purpose is to get the most coffee oils possible into the cup.
See here for more information, though it's in need of edits.http://snipr.com/1nibkHTH">http://snurl.com/invertedSee here for a picture of possible oil outcomes. http://snipr.com/1nibkHTH
- Scott

41) From: Scott Marquardt
On 6/24/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
Paper's not as permeable for oils, right. Some have reported good
results for oil with paper, but it's difficult to imagine that it
could succeed as well as poly.
Playing with poly led me to appreciate it for other reasons as well.
At a 5 micron nominal rating, it introduces very little fines --
though the turbidity of the cup may be controlled for with technique
("pumping" the press somewhat during pressing prevents early puck
formation, and results in what I call "darned fine fines" making it
into the cup; they don't introduce bitterness). The key thing I
appreciate is its dramatically high flow rate. If you fill an
Aeropress with water and press through the stuff, the plunger just
slams to the bottom of the press immediately.
There are a lot of implications for this high flow rate. I have two
favorite implications. The first is that sewing a #8 or #10 cone
filter allows for brewing more than 10 oz. in a manual pourover
(provided the grind isn't inconsistent and laden with dust, which
slows the flow). It's no problem to get a perfect extraction, and to
terminate that extraction with precision and without marooning brew in
the cone.
The second implication has value for Aeropressing, and that's that one
may use a much finer grind without fear of stalling the press. Because
of the higher flow rate (which is due to the "depth filtering" the
felt material presents to a slurry, in contrast with the "surface
filtering" paper or metalic filters offer), a finer grind may be used.
This may or may not be valuable to the user, depending on how
different folks dial in their variables. However, it's potentially
very valuable indeed for "whirly" grinder users. The reason is that
whirlies -- which grind with notorious inconsistency -- increase their
grind consistency at finer grind levels. The finer you go, the more
consistency you achieve. Because extraction consistency is a
determinant of cup quality, and because extraction consistency depends
utterly on grind consistency, this means that a better cup is in
theory achievable with a very fine whirly grind (or course, this is
moot for those with good burr grinders, who may choose any grind level
they wish and get good results). And in practice, I've found that to
be true.
I grind with an SMP at the farmer's market, with great results from a
stock Aero (no poly). But at work, we have a cheap whirly and I
Aeropress using very fine grind. Those with whirlies could probably
understand when I speak of a "10% grind" -- by which I mean that
tapping the thing upside down into the Aero funnel results in about a
third of the circumfrence of the grinder's chamber retaining a thin
rind of grind constituting about 10% of the grind's weight. That's
fairly fine -- though not so fine as a 40% grind.   ;-)
All this is subjective stuff, but it's not rocket science to see that
at such fine grind levels, grind consistency is much improved. And I
believe the theory is validated in the cups I enjoy daily, which I
favorably compare with anything I'd do at home with a much better
grinder (and when I am at home, I use a more conventional grind for
the Aero -- a bit finer than drip).
Anyway, the poly's throughput means you can grind finer with a whirly
without risking a press stall, and with enough throughput that you can
also press at the faster rate you must press in order to avoid
over-extraction with the much finer grind. IMO, this is a great way to
make whirlies respectable grinders!
- Scott

42) From: Rob Piirainen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Frank,
I also have an Aeropress & found your formula gives good coffee. Also I have
founf my french press with a good grinder, Zass or Saeco,  gives as good
maybe better, wich would depend on taste, 10-12 oz with one Aeropress
measureing scoop. I believe the advantage of the Aeropress is you don't need
a good consistent grind & easier to dispose of grounds & clean up.
Rob

43) From: Scott Marquardt
I'd have to disagree about not needing a consistent grind -- though in one
sense, under-extracting somewhat (thus using more coffee than by other
methods) will result in fewer products of over-extraction, and in that sense
an inconsistent grind won't yield as bad a result as by other methods (such
as drip).
However, there's another thing about the Aero. A whirly does an inconsistent
grind, as we all know. But though I haven't proven it, I believe its grind
becomes more consistent the finer one grinds. If that's true -- and
experientially in the cup I believe it is -- then a very fine grind
extracted in a relatively quick Aeropress cycle should be close to burr
quality brew.
At home I use an SMP, but at work I use a cheap whirly taken fine, and my
experience has been that I can achieve something like a normal extraction
without incurring bitter elements of over-extraction.
Thus the Aeropress is a device that can redeem cheap whirlies.
- S
On 8/19/07, Rob Piirainen  wrote:
<Snip>

44) From: Rick Copple
Frank Awbrey wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks, Frank. I did a little experimenting, and used two scoops. The 
bloom wasn't as bad (coffee's more rested now) and I ground to near 
espresso grind (7/8 around on my Zass), then filled it with water to 
near the top of the three mark. I ended up with a decent amount of 
concentrate in the cup. Added water up near the top. I made a good cup 
of coffee.
It did have a slight edge to it, and I'm not sure if that was due to the 
finer grind I had, or due to adding more water than 2 scoops calls for 
so in essence over extracting for the coffee I had. Maybe a bit of both. 
Yet, it wasn't a bad edge, and the coffee was good.
I think I'm zeroing in on what works for me. At least I'm getting close. 
I think the problem was last time I was getting an excessive amount of 
bloom, leaving little water actually in the cup.
However, I did get a very smooth "cup" of coffee one of those times. I 
think I used three scoops and it only put out a couple ounces of 
concentrate even though I filled it to the top of the three. I added 
about half as much water which made it a 4-5 oz cup. The flavor was very 
smooth and rich, and the chocolate in it was delicious. It just wasn't 
enough and took a lot of beans to produce that cup. :)
My standard brew method right now is a Yama vac pot, and I love the 
coffee that makes. I use a glass rod so I get the oils and all (I have 
the cloth filters, but no reason to really use them) So far I don't 
think I've made a cup from the AP that has beat that, but some that have 
come close to matching it. But I mainly got it for trips and the times I 
just want to make one cup, and because it is quick and cleans up easily. 
My swiss gold one cup filter works okay for that, but it is a pain to 
sit there and pour a little water in every once in a while. I don't know 
why they don't make those to hold a whole cup of water in the top so you 
can just put it in, slap the lid on and wait. But, that's another 
thread. It makes good coffee but takes longer and is a little 
bothersome. So I'm hoping the AP can take its place as my normal one-cup 
solution. :)
-- 
Rick Copple

45) From: John Carlson
Hello,
 
I've often read and re-read the Aeropress description, but never quite bought in. I currently use a crusty, aged, Swiss Gold single cup pour over (no longer available) when I want a single cup. Do you folks recommend I make the jump? 
<Snip>
See how Windows connects the people, information, and fun that are part of your life.http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/msnnkwxp1020093175mrt/direct/01/Homeroast mailing list
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46) From: Steve Barber
John,
I really like my Aeropress.  I think it will give you a cleaner cup than the
gold filter will....which you may or may not like.
On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 1:33 PM, John Carlson  wrote:
<Snip>
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47) From: Ira
At 11:33 AM 9/23/2008, you wrote:
<Snip>
It's inexpensive, it works, it's very consistent, it's easy to clean, 
the coffee is hot. When I don't want to wait for the espresso machine 
to heat up and I want one cup, it's what I currently use.
Ira
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48) From: Brian Kamnetz
John,
There's probably nothing wrong with your current method (depending on
the "crusty" part, that is). But the AP is quite popular, which
probably indicates it has some things going for it, and it's a pretty
cheap alternative that you can try to see how much you like it in
various situations compared to your current method. I don't know that
anyone will want to say you should "make the jump", if by that you
mean buying the AP thinking it is somehow "better". It is likely to be
different, you will likely like some things better, and likely will
prefer some things about your current method.
Not much help, I know, but I tried....
Brian
On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 2:33 PM, John Carlson  wrote:
<Snip>
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49) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd call ~$25 for an Aeropress for single cup brewing a baby hop at most,
~$1k and up for espresso machine and grinder for single cup brewing would be
"making the jump":-) 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIIhttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/Homeroast mailing list">http://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVII.htmSweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/Homeroast mailing list
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50) From:
Yes it is a nice clean cup....super easy for single cups and an ideal travel buddy. Not bad for thirty bucks. I stopped using my pourover entirely because the rate and brew time can't be well controlled.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.

51) From: John Despres
Yes
John Carlson wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
ght in. I currently use a crusty, aged, Swiss Gold single cup pour over (no=
 longer available) when I want a single cup. Do you folks recommend I make =
the jump? =
<Snip>
<Snip>
eroast> Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Aeropress prob=
lem> > Seth,> What is your #1 favorite method?> > On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 1=
1:27 AM, Seth Grandeau  wrote:> > > I would not call it=
 my favorite, but it is now indispensible for me. So> > much easier than ot=
her options when I just want a single cup, or an iced> > coffee, or I'm at =
work. So maybe it's #2 on my list. :)
<Snip>
<Snip>
 your life.
<Snip>
e.com
<Snip>
e.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
<Snip>
-- =
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JD’s Coffee Provoked Ramblings =
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52) From: Dennis
YESSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
John Despres wrote:
<Snip>
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53) From: raymanowen
"...Swiss Gold single cup pour over (no longer available)"
Did you know the TechniVorm can't brew any less than the full 10 cup
capacity? All hope abandon, ye who attempt brewing less than full capacity
with any brewer. Can't work if you think so...
It hasn't blown a fuse when I load 25g of grounds in a Gold filter in the
closed TV filter basket. Top it off with 16 oz boiling H2O, after tempering
the empty basket with boiling H2O and dribbling to break the crust. Makes a
4 cup equivalent Steinway.
A blend of the last of the 78-hour aged Brazil and 6 hour Costa Rica at City
was magic in the Leaker just now. Thursday afternoon's cup was built from
streams of Crema. What aroma and flavor!
This evening's cup will be a Brazil (C) creation of the Bialetti Venus. Note
to self: RESET GRINDER!!!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Tue, Sep 23, 2008 at 7:28 PM, Ira  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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54) From: Peter Minkow
I just received an AP as a present and have two observations. First, the one
I received does not have the column cup markers as depicted on the AP and
Sweetmarias website. It has dot markers. Secondly, I noticed that the scoop
seems to be about twice the size of my Yama vacpot.  My first cup was weak,
but the second one was quite good. I used enough water to get to the level
between the 2 and 3 markers. So, am I correct in concluding that it takes
about twice as much coffee to make a 10 ounce cup?
Peter
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55) From: Joseph Robertson
Peter,
The AP has been my home system of choice for the last two years. AP america=
n's.
JoeR
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 7:44 AM, Peter Minkow  wrote:
<Snip>
one
<Snip>
op
<Snip>
eak,
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
-- =
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.
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56) From: Yakster
I just picked up a second AP for work because I got tired of taking it back
and forth.
My routine is to grind three level scoops (or a little less if I'm running
low on home roast) and put on the tea kettle to make two cups of coffee for
the Wife and I.  If the homeroast is fresh, I grind as much ahead of time as
my tight morning schedule allows to help outgass some of the C02 and I
usually fill up the AP to the 4 dot and press into a small milk frothing
pitcher (the kind with the handle).  I pour out half into my cup and then
mix a spoon of sweetner in for my wife and pour into her cup.
These are probably around 6 - 8 oz cups, I put hers in a Bodum Pavina 9 oz
tumbler and mine in a travel cup to go off to work.
At work, I use 1 to 1.5 level scoops and press into my cup.  I recently
tried making three cups with four scoops when I had company and it seemed to
work ok, but that's pretty much the limit.
It definitely uses more coffee, but the coffee tastes really good.  Cleanup
is easy (just pull off the filter and pop the grounds into a pan to save for
your garden or compost) and if your cheap or concerned about the environment
you can even reuse the filters.  Much easier then getting the grounds out of
a French Press which is why I like it for work or at home when I'm in a
rush.
-Chris
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 7:44 AM, Peter Minkow  wrote:
<Snip>
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57) From: Yakster
The three scoops is for two cups of coffee.  One for me and one for my
Wife.  Not sure if that was clear in my first post.
-Chris
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 10:44 AM, Yakster  wrote:
<Snip>
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58) From: J.W.Bullfrog
I use the same amount of coffee as I would for a double espresso, etc. 2
scoops.
I fill the water up to the top, stir the foam around, add more water, press,
and then fill the missing vloume in the cup with water. (notice no talk
about dots, etc)
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 9:44 AM, Peter Minkow  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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59) From: Maxwell Heathcott
As far as dosing goes, I could be wrong, but I'd guess that there are about=
 as many different AP methods as there are people using them. Personally, I=
 don't like the idea of making a "coffee concentrate" that is then diluted =
with hot water--just doesn't make sense to my brain.  =
I use mine more or less like a french press: I grind moderately course (jus=
t a touch finer than a french press grind), dose at 17:1 (water:coffee), th=
en hit it with water one minute off the boil, let it steep for 3.5 minutes,=
 then cap it and press it into the cup. One cup of coffee good to go!
Note: I use the upside down method of brewing with the Aeropress, so there =
is not coffee dripping out into the cup while it brews. =
--mh
............................................................
............................................................
<Snip>
<Snip>
can's.
<Snip>
<Snip>
e one
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
coop
<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
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<Snip>
ffee.com
<Snip>
ffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
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60) From: Allon Stern
On May 7, 2009, at 10:44 AM, Peter Minkow wrote:
<Snip>
That's one biiiig scoop. I wonder why you're still getting weak  
coffee :)
On May 7, 2009, at 1:48 PM, J.W.Bullfrog wrote:
<Snip>
I use 1.5 scoops.
I usually microwave 1.5 cups of water in a 2-cup glass pyrex  
measuring cup for 3 minutes, then stir until it stops boiling, pour  
to fill the AP, swish for around a count of 20, while pouring in more  
water; if I don't think there's quite enough water, I'll wait a tiny  
bit for it to dribble through some, then top off again; I can gauge  
by how much water is left in the measuring cup the right amount. Then  
I dip the plunger in the remaining water in the measuring cup to wet  
it so it presses more smoothly, and press.
Also, I use approximately a drip grind, maybe slightly finer. If the  
puck falls apart when I remove the filter cover, I go a notch finer.
This morning's cup - 1 scoop Guatemale Oriente DP, .5 scoop Yemen  
Mokha Sana'ani. Chocolate fruit. Mmm.
-
allon
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61) From: Ira
At 10:48 AM 5/7/2009, you wrote:
<Snip>
That's exactly what i do. Start by measuring 25-26 grams of coffee, 
place in Rocky set to 22 and grind using that funny lid to blow the 
grounds out of the chute. Then when I'm finished I rinse off the 
screen of the Aeropress with hot water into the cup filling it to 12 
ounces or so.
Ira
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62) From: Frank Awbrey
I love my AP. My AP is the older one with the circles, no dots. Experiment
to your taste. I pretty much do mine the same way as JW. After the pressing,
I put water in the plunger to the bottom of the 2 mark +/-. The one
complaint from most people is the amount of coffee beans recommended used in
the AP. I am the only coffee drinker in the house and drink, normally, two
cups a day +/-, using two scoops per cup. Still, this amounts to
approximately $1.00 spent on coffee beans daily. Not bad for two cups of
good SM's coffee.
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 10:48 AM, J.W.Bullfrog wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"
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63) From: decrisce.md
I love the AP. I use three blue scaa scoops at 15 on the rocky. Fill the water up to the 4 dot, wait ten seconds and stir for ten, then press. For me, I add about an inch of water in the 10 oz mug (10-12) and fill the rest with ice. It makes a beautiful cup. 
Buy the way, I also got a cheap gold tone #4 or # 6 cone filter, and cut out two discs the size of the paper disc. I put them together in the filter holder. In my opinion makes for a substantially better cup than the paper (which I now never use). 
Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile

64) From: MichaelB
IMO the most important variables in making aeropress coffee are:
1. Dose or amount of coffee used
2. Fineness of grind (and quality too = amount of fines/dust produced by
grinder)
3. Amount of water for extraction (coming in contact with grounds vs added
after)
4. Temperature of the water
5. Amount of stirring
6. Brew time
7. Technique, e.g., inverted style only advantageous as it allows better
control of above variables
8. Type of filter material
There are several sets of directions out there for brewing, each of which
produces very different tastes. The way to get the best results from the
device is to understand how each variable affects taste and vary
systematically to achieve your desired result.
IMO the variable with the biggest effect is temperature. Use of the lower
temp the inventor recommends (with larger dose - the big spoon) will get you
a smooth, non-bitter, but limited taste extraction. Using higher temp (with
normal SCAA dose) will get you a more complex extraction more revealing of
the complexity of the coffees we buy and roast here.
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 10:44 AM, Peter Minkow  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB
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65) From: R Nepsund
The big aeropress thread with 1,768 posts  is athttp://coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/195166Personally I do it inverted with a 5 micron polyester felt filter
which I soak in oxyclean between uses.   The paper filter blocks the
coffee oils.
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 1:35 PM, MichaelB  wrote:
<Snip>
you
<Snip>
th
<Snip>
oop
<Snip>
weak,
<Snip>
el
<Snip>
fee.com
<Snip>
ee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
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66) From: J.W.Bullfrog
22 on the rocky! EXACTLY!!
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 1:06 PM, Ira  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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67) From: J.W.Bullfrog
22 on the rocky! EXACTLY!!
On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 1:06 PM, Ira  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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68) From: Dave
Huh. I set Rocky coarser than that, I use 40 (about +35 from true zero). I
might be able to go a little finer, but even at 40 I still sometimes get
over-extracted coffee. I think it happens when I don't hold the kettle off
the burner long enough before pouring. I try to just use 10 seconds or so
off-boil time (I live at sea level, for all practical purposes).
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On Sun, May 10, 2009 at 8:34 PM, J.W.Bullfrog wrote:
<Snip>
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69) From: Dean De Crisce
Hmmm...I use 21 (true zero at 5, therefore about 16). I wait ten seconds
after the water is poured and then stir for ten seconds. Works perfect. I
dont actually know the water temp, because I use the hot water dispenser
(steam wand) on the side of the saeco; it appears off boil.
I must add that I use a double gold filter and not the paper filter, which
may account for the difference in grind. If I go coarser then the water just
flows through. If I go finer, the push through pressure is too high.
Dean De Crisce
On Mon, May 11, 2009 at 12:48 AM, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>
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70) From: mpj100
Has anyone ever tore open a pod and used its contents in the Aeropress? My office has the Keurig/ Green Mtn commercial brewer and the coffee is just horific. I've been contemplating on bringing my Aeropress in and using the pods contents in the AP instead. 
Thoughts?
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71) From: decrisce.md
Interesting thought. If using the pods, why not just use the pod as is, without an additional filter. 
-

72) From: Bob Hazen
Life's too short for bad coffee.  Why not bring in some homeroast?
Bob

73) From: Joseph Robertson
Sounds like a desperate resort. Hey if you don't have a choice. I
might even use a sock in a pinch. <];^) .
I love the AP every day at home.
On Mon, May 11, 2009 at 1:31 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.
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74) From: Joe Scarborough
I read this too quickly and thought why would anyone want to break open an
ipod and put it in their AP?
Joe Scarborough
On Tue, May 12, 2009 at 10:18 PM, Joseph Robertson wrote:
<Snip>
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75) From: mvivit
Have to agree with Bob on this one. We've got the same machine in my  
office, and part of the problem is old coffee. (Given that I live in  
Utah, I shouldn't be surprised we still have pods from over a year  
ago!) I quit drinking it a while ago, except for the emergency  
pick-me-up or iced afternoon coffee. If possible, try to bring your  
own homeroast.
Mary in Utah
...where it's much too nice to be cooped up in the office
Quoting Bob Hazen :
<Snip>
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76) From: Seth Grandeau
We have the pods also.  I found if if I use 2 pods for a mug (stopping each
one halfway), I get a cup that's strong enough to make up for it's lack of
freshness.  By "make up" I mean it is drinkable.  I bring in a thermos of
homeroast each morning, so this desperation move is for that late afternoon
pick-me-up.
On 5/13/09, mvivit  wrote:
<Snip>
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77) From: Sandy Andina
I was able to use my AP over the weekend by doubling up on the  
contents of two K-Cups.  But our K-Cups are always pretty fresh, as in  
our house we go through quite a few of them--over a dozen--a day and  
thus order them often.
On May 19, 2009, at 11:10 AM, Seth Grandeau wrote:
<Snip>
Peace & song,
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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78) From: Demian Ebert
I have a whirly blade grinder for my AP at the office. No need to
resort to pods (even if they existed in my office).
Demian
On 5/19/09, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Sent from my mobile device
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79) From: John Fellowes
My rubber seal is too worn to do the inverted method but is still  
works well right side up
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80) From: kevin creason
You can get any part replaced for $5 from aerobie. Just call them.
 On Apr 26, 2013 3:52 PM, "John Fellowes"  wrote:
<Snip>
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81) From: Bob
Good laugh on this post--maybe its the large mug of icy cold Racer 5 I had 
with lunch. Emailing Aerobie now for a $5 left shoulder and right knee.

82) From: Greg Gearheart
I can't do the inverted method either, but that is a long story.  I just
paypalled $5 to Aerobie.  Will report back soon.
On Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 3:09 PM, Bob  wrote:
<Snip>
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83) From: Barry Luterman
Think they might have an Infundibulum for me. I really don't need one .I
just love saying it. My students always knew it was going to appear on one
of my tests because I kept repeating it in class.
On Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 3:09 PM, Bob  wrote:
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