HomeRoast Digest


Topic: "Sweetest" Coffee? (12 msgs / 261 lines)
1) From: Gene Smith
Since I am off artificial sweeteners (though I may try Stevia in some form) 
and don't want to load up on sugar either, what are your thoughts on what 
coffees are "sweetest" in the cup?  I realize that perceived "bitterness" 
can come from a variety of sources other than just the bean varietal, but, 
assuming it is properly roasted, rested and brewed, what vairetals - or 
blends - would listers think would least need sugar...or, need the least 
sugar?
Gene Smith
who, unfortunately, still likes his coffee sweet, in Houston

2) From: Jeff Oien
Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Sumatra Lintong and almost any Brazil are those that come to mind.
JeffO

3) From: Paul Goelz
At 12:01 PM 2/6/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
I like CRLM with a bit of cream.  A mild full flavored coffee without 
any bitterness.  But I would not call it sweet.
I trained myself long ago "just because" to omit sugar in my 
coffee.  And now I find that I much prefer it unsweetened.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

4) From: Aaron
but, exactly 'what' makes said coffee sweet?  Are there possibly some 
small amounts of sugars in the bean that are adding that 'sweetness' to 
the overall flavor, or is it something else entirely that is making it 
'sweet'.
if it's something that is not sugar, then maybe we need to start 
studying the coffee bean closer for a true 'non sugar based' sweetener.
Kona has a nice sweet flavor, and most of the brazillians I have found.  
But the 'sweetness' is different between the two.
Just like chocolate is sweet, and so are strawberries, but it's a 
different type of sweet one is tasting..if that makes sense.
aaron

5) From: tom ulmer
The Costa Rican "Miel" at Sweet Maria's has a wonderful sweet flavor =
when
roasted darker. Another one of my favorites is an odd roast of =
Yirgacheffe.
This was an accidental discovery that I've since incorporated into the =
mix.
Approximately  of the way to first crack stop the rotation until a =
few
significant cracks occur - then proceed with the standard roast. A few =
of
the beans do indeed get rather dark, but the roast as a whole turns =
sweeter,
which for my tastes adds a delightful flavor component to Yirgacheffe.

6) From: Jeff Oien
I forgot to mention Mexico as another origin.
JeffO

7) From: an iconoclast
On 2/6/06, Gene Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
m)
<Snip>
,
<Snip>
I think most of the decafs are sweet.  It may have something to do
with the process to decaffeinate them.  I drink them daily and notice
this sweetness all the time. I'm frequently known to say, "Yummm!"
while I dink these at work.  Now I have 2 non-coffee drinkers sharing
my coffee on a daily basis.  I keep a Vacuvin container full of
grounds in my desk drawer.  I show them how to use the Swiss Gold one
cup filter once.  Then they have to get their own as I'm a nurse not a
waitress!
I also think the Brazil YB was very sweet. I'm, sadly, down to 9 lbs.
Ann

8) From: Brent Peterson
Gene,
   
  If sweetness is your objective, then the degree of roast is probably more important than the varietal.  Although it varies a bit, most coffees are at their peak sweetness at a fairly light roast--City to City+.
   
  Having said that, the bean varietal definitely makes a difference.   If your standard is "white sugar" sweetness, then I would say the sweetest coffee I ever had was last year's Bolivia Organic Cenaproc.  Roasted to a city+, I found that it had a distinct "sugar" sweetness that stood apart from the mild fruit flavors in the cup.   It looks like Tom is offering a new Bolivian this month--it appears to cup differently than last year's Cenaproc, but it might be worth a try.
   
  I have also found that most Columbian coffees--when roasted lightly--tend to be very sweet. 
   
  I've noticed a couple of votes here for Brazilian and Sumatran coffees.  Although these coffees can definitely be sweet, the fact that they are usually dry or semi-dry processed will make them less "cleanly sweet" than some of the wet processed coffees of Central and South America.  That's not a bad thing, but you might want to keep in mind that a sweet Sumatran is going to be a lot different than a sweet Columbian.
   
Gene Smith  wrote:
  Since I am off artificial sweeteners (though I may try Stevia in some form) 
and don't want to load up on sugar either, what are your thoughts on what 
coffees are "sweetest" in the cup? I realize that perceived "bitterness" 
can come from a variety of sources other than just the bean varietal, but, 
assuming it is properly roasted, rested and brewed, what vairetals - or 
blends - would listers think would least need sugar...or, need the least 
sugar?
Gene Smith
who, unfortunately, still likes his coffee sweet, in Houston---------------------------------
 Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses.

9) From: Scott Marquardt
Ann -
Just a couple days ago I realized I'd have to start buying decaf on behalf
of others (you know you've turned a corner when you're willing to turn THAT
corner when you don't even drink the stuff yourself ;-)
Any suggestions? Wisdom for a "regular" drinker? The picks are more rare, s=
o
I suppose when you find something good you really have a sense for why you
like it.

10) From: Justin Marquez
On 2/6/06, Brent Peterson  wrote:
<Snip>
at
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
ot
<Snip>
   I have a Guat. "Nimaya" coffee that is decidedly sweet when roasted City
to City Plus. In addition, there is little floral kick in it too. The
roasted beans almost smell like a bunch of flowers in the bag.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com

11) From: Spencer Thomas
You've got to counterbalance this with the fact that lightly roasted coffee=
s
are also "brighter" -- more acidic.  I once had an extremely lightly roaste=
d
Kenyan coffee (at a commercial coffee house/roaster) that was so acidic tha=
t
if you added milk, it curdled.  Roasting the beans darker breaks down the
acids.  It also breaks down the sugars.  I suspect that which flavor goes
away faster depends on the individual bean.
None of which discussion is helpful in determining which beans are sweeter.
Decaf will taste sweeter because caffeine is bitter.  When the caffeine is
removed, the coffee tastes sweeter.
On 2/6/06, Brent Peterson  wrote:
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
--
=Spencer in Ann Arbor
My Unitarian Jihad http://tinyurl.com/6valr)Name is:
Sibling Dagger of Mild Reason
What are you?http://homepage.mac.com/whump/ujname.html

12) From: an iconoclast
On 2/6/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
f
<Snip>
AT
<Snip>
 so
<Snip>
u
<Snip>
Tanzanian Peaberry, Guatemala Huehuetenango,  and Ethiopian Sidamo are
probably my favorite decafs.  I blend the Tanzanian PB and Gauat 50/50
and then add a pinch of Donkey Blend decaf roasted to Vienna. 
Wonderful!  I just roasted (actually my husband, the labor-saving
device roasted) some Sulawesi decaf.  Haven't tasted that yet.  Also
roasted some Costa Rica decaf to go along with it.  Will taste each
seperately and then 50/50 and see what I get.
I also think you get a sweeter cup if you stay away from 2nd crack. 
For the last couple of weeks, I've tried roasting to the verge or a
few snaps into 2nd crack and I haven't really been liking it.  It's
good if I'm going to add cream, but I prefer my black coffee roasted
to City or City+.  I had tried Sandy's darker roasts and have been
getting pressure from my in-laws about roasting darker.  Funny thing
though, they want darker coffee, but use only 5 scoops of coffee for
the KMB.  I use 7+ scoops.  So I think they are confusing dark with
strong.  I think dark brings bitter where more coffee brings stronger
coffee without being bitter. I'm going back to lighter roasts!
Ann


HomeRoast Digest