HomeRoast Digest


Topic: top 6 coffees (14 msgs / 397 lines)
1) From: susan oppenheim
hi all
can you suggest your top 6 favorites-not exotics but staples-all in the
affordable but not cheapo nor expensive
what you would consider the good old dependables for a newbie that wants to
have success at roasting and is just getting their feet wet
I am trying to remember those days myself-but it's 3 years ago now
so far I have in mind
costa rican 
brazilian
indonesian (sumatran or java )
kenyan
colombian
either on list or off
thanks
java mama
susan oppenheim
toronto

2) From: Darliene Stanhope
The six staples in my stash are:
Kenyan
Ethiopian
Yemen
Costa Rican
Nicaragua
Columbian
Darliene
in cloudy Florida
On 2/23/06, susan oppenheim  wrote:
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3) From: Woody DeCasere
beginning roasters? I've been roasting for about 3 years now and am still a
newbie so here is my top 6 always in my stash
Kenya AA
Sumatra
Paupa New Guinea
Ethiopian Dry Processed
Guatemala
yes i love african and Indonisian Coffee's
On 2/23/06, Darliene Stanhope  wrote:
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s
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--
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

4) From: an iconoclast
On 2/23/06, susan oppenheim  wrote:
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to
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Java
Brazil
Ethiopia
Tanzania
Guatemala
Costa Rica
Yummm.
Ann

5) From: Sandy Andina
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My affordable staples :
Guatemalan Huehuetenango (regular and decaf)
Rwanda Gatare AA
Mexico Chiapas UDEPOM
Harar Horse (FTO Organic is an acceptable substitute)
Espresso Donkey
Espresso Monkey
Liquid Amber
Greenline & Decaf Greenline (Metropolis' homeroaster green versions  
of their Red Line espressos)
Costa Rica SHB Decaf
Sumatra Lintong
On Feb 23, 2006, at 7:22 PM, Woody DeCasere wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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My affordable staples =
:Guatemalan Huehuetenango (regular and decaf)Rwanda =
Gatare AAMexico Chiapas UDEPOMHarar Horse (FTO =
Organic is an acceptable substitute) Espresso =
DonkeyEspresso MonkeyLiquid =
AmberGreenline & Decaf Greenline (Metropolis' homeroaster =
green versions of their Red Line espressos)Costa Rica SHB =
DecafSumatra Lintong
On Feb 23, 2006, =
at 7:22 PM, Woody DeCasere wrote:
beginning roasters? I've been roasting for about 3 = years now and am still a newbie so here is my top 6 always in my = stash   Kenya AA Sumatra = Paupa New Guinea Ethiopian Dry Processed = Guatemala   yes i love african and = Indonisian Coffee's   On = 2/23/06, Darliene Stanhope <darlienestanhope&= gt; wrote: The = six staples in my stash are: Kenyan = Ethiopian Yemen Costa Rican = Nicaragua Columbian Darliene = in cloudy Florida   On = 2/23/06, susan oppenheim <opulence > wrote: = hi all can you = suggest your top 6 favorites-not exotics but staples-all in = the affordable but not cheapo nor expensive what you would = consider the good old dependables for a newbie that wants to have = success at roasting and is just getting their feet wet I am = trying to remember those days myself-but it's 3 years ago now = so far I have in mind costa = rican brazilian indonesian (sumatran or java = ) kenyan colombian either on list or = off thanks java mama susan oppenheim toronto = homeroast mailing = list http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast= To change your personal list settings (digest options, = vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
--= "Good night, and Good Coffee" = = --Apple-Mail-13--771173285--

6) From: Aaron
Here's what Id rate as the top 6.
1.  Anything NOT Starbucks.
2.  Anything NOT Maxwell House
3.  Anything NOT Folgers
4.  Anything NOT Bean Street
5.  Anything NOT Millstone
6.  Anything NOT Gevalia
after that, let your individual tastes and preferences preside.
Aaron

7) From: Jeff Oien
A list:
Mexico
Brazil
Harar
Colombia
Java
That's only five. But take any of those too far and you've
still got really nice coffee. I personally wouldn't put Kenya
on the list for a beginner because it's easy to go a little
too far with the roast and lose so much of what it has to offer.
That may also be the case with some of Tom's fantastic Colombia
and Brazil offerings but I've ruined a few Kenya roasts by
going to far and totally flattening them.
JeffO
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8) From: mIke mcKoffee
Hey Java Mama, 
Jeff makes a good point. I believe you're looking for suggested coffee
greens to have for newbie home roasters. IMO you don't want anything extreme
and do want coffees that work well in a wide range of roasts. Uganda, Timor,
Panama first 3 that come to mind. Plus agree with a Sumatra and or Sulawesi
and Rwanda. I disagree with Costa Ricans as a whole as they tend to have a
narrow sweet spot. Horse too wild for most. Definitely not Yirg' or Kenya
for beginning palates. Brazil often too bland as an SO as a rule and as
mentioned can easily be over roasted. Maybe a Columbian, actually probably
should have a Columbian since so many people are familiar with Juan. A good
Mexican also well balanced coffee taking wide roast range. Maybe offer one
"extreme" taste coffee at a time at most rotating them until you learn your
customers and they learn too!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.http://www.mdm.livingfreeandclear.com<Snip>

9) From: Jeff Oien
I agree with you as far as palate and Harar goes. I was
just thinking about the roasting aspect. It seems to always
come out well. But it is probably a bean that people either love
or hate. I think you could say the same for Sumatra, especially if
roasted on the lighter side. My wife says it tastes like dirt. :)
I would stick with Brazil, as most beginning roasters probably
aren't doing espresso. Brazil is becoming my favorite origin
for drip, especially after having the Cerrado CoE #2.
JeffO
mIke mcKoffee wrote:
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10) From: Turbosimba
ok, just for the fun of it, I'll add my favs:
 
1. Yemen Mokha, the best fruit flavors, very, very unusual and bursting  with 
flavor
 
2. Kenya, wine, fruit and earth
 
3. India Monsoon  earthy, earthy, earthy
 
4. Papua New Guinea what Indonesian coffees are all about 
 
5. Guatemala Antiqua or Huehuetenango, coffee lovers' coffee
 
6. Jamaica Blue Mountain, when you can get it fresh. Sweet and smooth, not  
really worth the sky high prices, but fun as a treat once a year.
 
That takes you around the world, almost... 
 
There isn't one of these that I'd take all the way to the second crack. I  
love the varietal flavor of each and want to preserve it at all cost. 
 
Jeff

11) From: Brett Mason
Colombia Popayan
Brazil Fazenda
Uganda Bugisu
Mexico Chiapas
Sulawesi Toraja
Honduras Fabio Caballero
OK, well there are some of mine...
Brett
On 2/23/06, susan oppenheim  wrote:
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to
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

12) From: Scott Marquardt
Colombia
PNG
Kenya
Brazil (Daterra)
Harrar
Guatemala (Huehuetenango) for iced in the summer ;-)
It's worth having a "stock" bean you can roast in your sleep -- something
you'd be willing to serve to anybody, anytime, anywhere, and know they'd
enjoy it. It's also handy if it's a bean and you use a roast that doesn't
absolutely need a rest to be good -- something that's good the next morning
and a week later too.
I'm currently using a Colombian as my staple -- one with a great cherry
aromatic in the cup. Everyone loves it. The Daterra Sweet Yellow I'm almost
out of of, though, got absolute raves from everyone, and if it were
available consistently I'd make it a staple. PNG would be my third choice
for a staple.
Since I've only been roasting for a year, there are a LOT of origins I need
to explore yet, though. I'm quite convinced I haven't tasted the most
awesome exemplars of each, yet. On the other hand, you can't count on alway=
s
having the most awesome of any given bean, so it's worth coming to terms
with merely excellent coffee, not just the occasional 10 pounds of
breathtaking stuff you come by.  ;-)

13) From: Scot Murphy
On |Feb 23, at 8:24 PM|Feb 23, Jeff Oien wrote:
<Snip>
Okay, I'll step in:
1. Always constant, Papua New Guinea. It's the most consistently  
smooth, flavorful, mild, "coffee-est" coffee.
2. If I could buy another 60 pounds of the Indian Pearl Mountain MNEB  
Nuggets from last year, I would.
3. Ethiopian Harrar Horse. Mmm, blueberries.
4. Ethiopian Ghimbi in a good (blackberry) year.
5. Ugandan Bugisu on the top of its (chocolate-bomb) game.
6. Panama Boquete. Clean, sweet, sometimes with plum- or cherry-like  
notes.
Scot "now, that Brazilian Fazenda Ipanema Dulce...yum!" Murphy
---
"Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom: it is  
the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves."
		--William Pitt

14) From: Michael Dhabolt
You gotta go for the gusto.  If you are a homeroaster why not figure
out what this is all about.  None of these are difficult to roast
well, - - some have a learning curve to roast great (even if you've
been at it for years).  When you even get close, it is -----"  Oh My
!", if not it is still really good coffee.  And, with me at least, an
occasional accident gets me to a great roast and keeps me learning.
Harrar Horse,
Yirgacheffe,
Bugisu,
Monsooned Malabar (blend in 10 or 15% with anything).....at first,
any two Brazils that tom sells.
Mike (just plain, waiting for ....)


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