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Topic: SC/TO...mod pics posted.... (2 msgs / 100 lines)
1) From: Ron Feroni
I'm no photographer so you'll have to just deal with the pics..:).  The pics 
should give you a good idea of what I did.  I will briefly explain a few 
things again as you now have the pics to look at.
Steel shaft mod..2" long 1/4" thread hex bolt JB welded(epoxied) into a 1/4" 
drive 7/16" socket.  Let that sit per epoxy destructions.  Once cured, I 
used a 1/4" drive 1/2" socket turned upside down over the bolt.  This socket 
is used as a centering device so the whole shaft doesn't wobble while 
turning.  I then slipped on a normal size 1/4" flat washer so it sits on the 
socket.  I then put on the stirring arm I made(more on that later).  I then 
cut two slots in a 1" wide 1/4" hole 'fender washer' and bent the washer 
slots over and around the stirring arm.  This holds the stirring arm in 
place so it doesn't turn as the motor turns the beans.  I then put on a 1/4" 
nut(duh!) and cranked it down nice and snug.  I then did the slotted copper 
cap mod.
Couple things...for the bottom socket to fit thru the SC and on the motor 
shaft a few simple things need to be done.  First, you have to drill out the 
bottom hole on the base of the SC(The black plastic base part of the SC, NOT 
the metal pan where the beans go!).  I followed the web directions and used 
a 1/2" bit at an angle to make sure the socket would fit.  I would say if 
you have a 9/16" bit try that, maybe even a 5/8" bit.  It's a little messy 
using the drill at an angle with the 1/2" bit and if your not careful it 
will tear up the plastic.  If all you have is a 1/2" bit make sure you take 
your time and that the drill is fully engaged before you touch it to the 
plastic.  If the bit is touching the plastic base as you pull the trigger it 
will likely gouge(sp?)out the base.
Secondly...I sliced off the pointed tip of the motors plastic shaft so the 
socket would slip on a little better.  Remember, you now have a hex bolt 
welded inside the socket acting as a stop.  By shaving just a bit off the 
point it will let the socket drop down to where it should be.
STIRRING ARM...I made mine exactly how the old one was.  It took me a couple 
hours of tweaking to get it just right.  In the pics you will see how close 
the tolerances are to the SC pan.  You really want to make sure that the 
arms are just a 'hair' above the base.  Even if they are rubbing(especially 
where the 'bump' is on the pan)ever so lightly it should be fine.  If the 
arms are to far above the pan you will trap beans and cause the motor to run 
back and forth, as I'm sure many of you know.....this would result in a 
somewhat uneven roast I think...
I just want to say I did not come up with any of these mods, I just tweaked 
them to my preference.  The following are the web pages I used, and also my 
pics of my tweaks.
I'd also like to say to those that are going to do this make sure and take 
your time.  Make sure the parts you have fit your setup.  Where I used a 
certain size socket you may need a different size to get better tolerances.  
Just double check everything you do so you don't have to do it twice.
Oh yes, I disables the heating element on the SC also...http://www.bish.ws/coffee/TurboCrazy.htmlGood luck all, any question let me know!">http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ronf27/album?.dir=f3a0&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ronf27/my_photoshttp://biobug.org/coffee/turbo-crazy/http://www.bish.ws/coffee/TurboCrazy.htmlGood luck all, any question let me know!
Ron

2) From: Demian Ebert
Thanks Ron-
I just posted a few of my own pictures from the modifications to the Stir
Crazy in the Roasting Data yahoo groups site. Sorry, no other web vehicle
right now.http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roasting_Data/The modifications are basically those Ron described for the center shaft. I
used a 13mm 3/8 drive socket for the spacer with a 1/4 inch flange washer
that centers the shaft within the socket. The socket itself perfectly fills
the hole in the Stir Crazy pan. I like the way this works. I had to bend th=
e
stirring arm to get it close enough to the pan to stir properly. I think
this is probably the most critical element of this roaster. After two roast=
s
I'm not too happy with the way the beans move, but then I'm used to the
iRoast where they move much more. I ended up using two pieces of aluminum
tubing on the arms. They are sort of held in place by a couple of 1/4inch
binder clips for now. I found that the round worked better for moving beans=
.
I had some paddle arms that were ok and even tried a mix of the paddle with
a roller. Perhaps the best would be an upright paddle with and downward
facing brush... Maybe next time.
I managed to roast two 1/2 lb batches of UGH as a test. The flaming chaff
was a bit disconcerting and I think I'll have to improve the chaff ejection
system. Other than that, and the rain which started pouring on me during th=
e
second batch, I kind of liked having control of the process again.
Demian


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