HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Advice needed - Am I getting to be a snob? (13 msgs / 401 lines)
1) From: Frank Parth
Like most of us who are "ahem", over 50, I grew up with percolators. And like most technical wienies I poured the stuff from the commercial pot into my cup, got distracted, and ended up drinking it cold. I cleaned my cup every six months whether it needed it or not. 
Later I graduated to grinding my own (thought that was really hot stuff) and using a Krups machine to make drip coffee. On a trip to Seattle in the early 90's I discovered what real coffee should taste like. So I started buying beans at Starbucks (please don't start another thread on this!). When a Diedrich's shop opened near my house I tried that and liked that a lot more. It wasn't as heavily roasted as Starbucks beans. At the time, Diedrichs had their own roaster in Orange County (CA) so the beans were pretty freshly roasted. Then the Diedrich sons inherited the place, got macho, and dragged the company into dept faster than you can say "Sanka? Not for me." In cutting costs the quality went pretty far down. 
So I kinda went back and forth between the two before I discovered green beans and roast your own. Some of the coffee is good, some is better. Still trying to find that magic combination of grind, temperature, and time to make it perfect each cup. 
But now I'm on a trip to the Boston area for a couple of weeks. Tried the hotel coffee and went yuck. (I don't have an Aeropress and absolutely no room in my suitcase for anything bigger). So I stopped at a Starbucks on the way to the client the other day and almost gagged on the coffee. It was much more bitter than I remembered. Is this a bad shop, or am I just getting to be a snob?
Frank Parth

2) From: Aaron
Both frank.
Charbucks is nasty coffee, AND you being more educated now, realize that 
immediately, so yes... a bit of snobbism is in there too.
Aaron

3) From: National Prison Consultants
I was thought you didn't want to start another thread on *$????
However, being familiar with Boston, I can recommend the Espresso Royale
shops.  There are 2 or 3 around metro Boston:  1 on Newbury if I recall.
However, you do want to head up to the North End where you can find some of
the best Italian eateries in NE as well as some fine "unnamed" espresso
bars. They really, do have, names I just don't recall them Don't be afraid
to go so some of the restaurants just for a shot or two of espresso. Hanover
Street has most of them. 
Without starting another thread on "you know who" I cant respond to your
last question......
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Frank Parth
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2006 9:29 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Advice needed - Am I getting to be a snob?
Like most of us who are "ahem", over 50, I grew up with percolators. And
like most technical wienies I poured the stuff from the commercial pot into
my cup, got distracted, and ended up drinking it cold. I cleaned my cup
every six months whether it needed it or not. 
Later I graduated to grinding my own (thought that was really hot stuff) and
using a Krups machine to make drip coffee. On a trip to Seattle in the early
90's I discovered what real coffee should taste like. So I started buying
beans at Starbucks (please don't start another thread on this!). When a
Diedrich's shop opened near my house I tried that and liked that a lot more.
It wasn't as heavily roasted as Starbucks beans. At the time, Diedrichs had
their own roaster in Orange County (CA) so the beans were pretty freshly
roasted. Then the Diedrich sons inherited the place, got macho, and dragged
the company into dept faster than you can say "Sanka? Not for me." In
cutting costs the quality went pretty far down. 
So I kinda went back and forth between the two before I discovered green
beans and roast your own. Some of the coffee is good, some is better. Still
trying to find that magic combination of grind, temperature, and time to
make it perfect each cup. 
But now I'm on a trip to the Boston area for a couple of weeks. Tried the
hotel coffee and went yuck. (I don't have an Aeropress and absolutely no
room in my suitcase for anything bigger). So I stopped at a Starbucks on the
way to the client the other day and almost gagged on the coffee. It was much
more bitter than I remembered. Is this a bad shop, or am I just getting to
be a snob?
Frank Parth

4) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-64-97390332
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
If it's still there, head around the corner from the Copley Plaza  
Hotel toward the Copley Place mall and cross the street to Speeder &  
Earl's (in the small hotel, I think it's the Copley Sq. or Copley  
Place or something like that). Great, fresh coffees and breakfasts to  
die for.
On Mar 5, 2006, at 8:28 PM, Frank Parth wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-64-97390332
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
If it's still there, head around =
the corner from the Copley Plaza Hotel toward the Copley Place mall and =
cross the street to Speeder & Earl's (in the small hotel, I think =
it's the Copley Sq. or Copley Place or something like that). Great, =
fresh coffees and breakfasts to die for. 
On Mar 5, 2006, =
at 8:28 PM, Frank Parth wrote:
Like most of us who are "ahem", over 50, I grew up = with percolators. And like most technical wienies I poured the stuff = from the commercial pot into my cup, got distracted, and ended up = drinking it cold. I cleaned my cup every six months whether it needed it = or not.  Later I = graduated to grinding my own (thought that was really hot stuff) and = using a Krups machine to make drip coffee. On a trip to Seattle in the = early 90's I discovered what real coffee should taste like. So I started = buying beans at Starbucks (please don't start another thread on this!). = When a Diedrich's shop opened near my house I tried that and liked that = a lot more. It wasn't as heavily roasted as Starbucks beans. At the = time, Diedrichs had their own roaster in Orange County (CA) so the beans = were pretty freshly roasted. Then the Diedrich sons inherited the place, = got macho, and dragged the company into dept faster than you can say = "Sanka? Not for me." In cutting costs the quality went pretty far = down.  So I = kinda went back and forth between the two before I discovered green = beans and roast your own. Some of the coffee is good, some is better. = Still trying to find that magic combination of grind, temperature, and = time to make it perfect each cup.  But now I'm = on a trip to the Boston area for a couple of weeks. Tried the hotel = coffee and went yuck. (I don't have an Aeropress and absolutely no room = in my suitcase for anything bigger). So I stopped at a Starbucks on the = way to the client the other day and almost gagged on the coffee. It was = much more bitter than I remembered. Is this a bad shop, or am I just = getting to be a snob?Frank Parthhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-64-97390332--

5) From: National Prison Consultants
There you go again, Aaron.  Now they are going to blame me for starting
another Starbucks thread.  Thanks brother! 
John Webster

6) From: Aaron
But I didnt start the thread, I just replied.  and I was actually fairly 
civil this time too.... must be the caffeine overdose from this 
morning... yeah that sounds good... :)
Aaron

7) From: Brett Mason
I had a 6x3 after dinner - maybe that's why I didn't engage...
Starbucks just didn't compare with my Colombia Narino 6 shots... 
Sounds like John got him over to some good places in Boston.  Thanks
John!
Brett
On 3/5/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

8) From: b cook
I read an interesting thing on a co-op forum recently.  A guy who claims to
have coffee connections in Nicaragua said that his coffee people there tell
him that Dunkin Donuts buys their best quality beans and then Charbucks
comes in and buys much of what's left over.  That gave me a chuckle and
partially explains why I prefer DD over Charbucks any day!
brad

9) From: Brett Mason
have you considered that Starbucks drives a lot more coffee through
their roasters?  They have to maintain their roast profile - there's
no way they can do the volume, and the quality, and also maintain the
highest quality beans.  They have to buy far enough down the quality
chain to get the volume that meets their delivery requirements.
Same is true of many chain restaurants...
It's why I always like the local bistros.  And why I roast my own...
Brett
On 3/5/06, b cook  wrote:
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
ll
<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

10) From: Aaron
doesn't S bucks also add flavorings to most of their coffee's too. or is 
all that oil in them just because they are so overdone?
If they do flavor them, then it matters even less the quality of bean 
they use, they'll just cover up the nastiveness with the flavoring of 
choice, in which case it makes good business sense to buy the cheapest 
bean they can get away with.
Brett you are correct, most chain restaraunts, or 'industry' foods, they 
bulk order the not very good stuff, and chemically bring it up to 
'edible' and 'preservable'.
Not every slab of meat gets to be a porterhouse steak... McDonalds needs 
inventory too.
Aaron

11) From: Brett Mason
I don't think Starbucks flavors their beans.  They just roast them
darker - gets more caramelized sugars inside the bean, masks some of
the other stuff.  Oil is cause how long they roast.
Unfortunately, they have attained a size which precludes them from the
highest excellence.
For example, look at their expensive coffees available  for purchase -
the date says "Best if used by" and then goes about 6 months out.  How
does this compare with your study on storage?
Exactly,
Brett
  Zass not suitable for *$ beans....
On 3/5/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

12) From: Ed Needham
Brett, maybe you meant to say more 'carbonized' sugars.  When the beans go 
oily, they are either old or roasted very dark.  The cellular structure 
breaks down when it goes that dark and the oils come to the surface faster. 
In roasting, the starches are converted to sugars, the sugars melt and are 
caramelized, and then the caramel burns to carbon.
I've found the sweet spot for many beans and to maximize the caramel and 
still allow for a roastiness is to stop just at second crack, before any oil 
begins to show.
Of course what I like might be different than the millions who frequent 
Starbies every day.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

13) From: Brett Mason
Yes Ed - thanks for clarifying - indeed I did mean carbonized...
Brett
On 3/6/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
r.
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
oil
<Snip>
ce)
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!


HomeRoast Digest