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Topic: Timing Hot Top Bean Input (5 msgs / 124 lines)
1) From: Doug Hutson
Sometimes it tastes great to mix two roasts of the same varietal for a great flavor. Tom frequently suggests doing so, such as roasting a coffee to city and mixing it with the same coffee roasted to full city+. With my Hot Top, though, I like to roast from 250 to 275 grams, and to mix two roasts gives me more coffee than I can drink before it starts to get leggy.
Has anyone experimented with adding the beans at different times during the Hot Top roast cycle to achieve the desired mix, or has anyone ever tried roasting in the Hot Top by adding green beans to a cold machine and then adding more beans later to achieve a mix. How do beans roasted with a slow start, such as achieved by adding them to a cold machine before preheating, taste? 
Please forgive me if this has recently been discussed, but I think I have read most everything the past few years.
D  Hutson

2) From: Espressoperson
In a message dated 3/10/2006 2:22:28 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
volboy writes:
Has  anyone experimented with adding the beans at different times during the 
Hot  Top roast cycle to achieve the desired mix, or has anyone ever tried 
roasting  in the Hot Top by adding green beans to a cold machine and then adding 
more  beans later to achieve a mix. How do beans roasted with a slow start, 
such as  achieved by adding them to a cold machine before  preheating, taste? 
I don't think your suggestions for adding beans at different times will  lead 
to the true melange blends that you are looking for.
 
From what I have read about the hottop and seen through my temp  
measurements, it has a slow startup at low pre-roast temperatures to dry  the beans before 
turning up the temperature to start roasting. Presumably this  leads to more 
even roasting and smoother roasts. One extreme of too  long preroast drying is 
a dull or baked roast (i.e., if you put the beans in a  cold machine). The 
other extreme of too short a preroast drying  is producing a roast that is too 
bright or sour (if you put the  beans in a machine later in the roast cycle). 
So it is possible that putting  beans in at different times may change the way 
they taste - but not by changing  the end state roast level. The built in 
hottop profile pulls the  beans along throughout the roasting cycle and I would 
bet that all the  beans would be at the same final roast level at the end of the 
roast.
 
MichaelB
 

3) From: Mike Chester
I have not tried adding to the Hottop during the roast, but last week I 
roasted 250 g of Hula Daddy for 18 min. in the HT and 150 g for 7:45 in the 
I-Roast 2 and blended them together.  I figured that the drum accented the 
body and the air roaster accented the brightness so the blend would have 
both.  So far, the results are good.  The coffee has body and brightness.  I 
plan to try this with other varieties also.  I have noticed differences 
between the two roasters in flavor profiles.  I liked the Java Prince much 
more from the air roaster.  It had enough bright spots to stand as a SO. 
From the HT, it needs to be blended with something brighter.
Mike Chester

4) From: Barry Luterman
That's exactly what I do. I do 2, 250 gr roasts, in the Hottop of a Kenya or 
other high altitude coffee. While the Hottop is cooling between roasts I 
roast a less acidic coffee like Java prince in my I-roast 150 gr. Then blend 
the two roasts together. I am getting some outstanding blends.

5) From: DJ Garcia
Actually I've been loading my HT later rather than sooner. I like the
roasts I've been getting better and I tend to do 280-300 gm loads. I've
been loading when the HT digital temp reads around 250-260 degrees F.,
between one  to two minutes after the load alarm goes off. The beans
appear to me a bit tastier - of course I may be making this up in my
mind ...
DJ


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