HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Selling small quantities of home roasted coffee (35 msgs / 1098 lines)
1) From: an iconoclast
For those who sell some of their home roasted coffee:
How do you choose what greens to purchase?  How much do you roast?  Do
you take orders or do they buy what you have?  How do you package it?
If not appropriate for the mailing list, I would appreciate advice off
line.  I had saved some messages related to this, but I have to say
Google mail is crap for filing and saving stuff.  Delete one message
in the thread and it's all gone even though I've starred it and
archived it.
Thanks so much.  My brain is hurting with all this thinking!
Ann

2) From: Brett Mason
Hi Ann,
I use a "standard" coffee for all my selling
I make a Christmas Blend for December
I roast it all the same way
I use cellophane lined bags to pack the beans
I usually do free shipping if 4lb are ordered
I charge $10 a lb
My coffee is always a Colombia (Supremo or Narino)
I buy my coffee from Sweet Marias in 20lb bags for price efficiency
I have cultivated some standing orders to keep my business moving
I also give out 1/4 lb samples to friends, but they know I sell, and
they come back for more...
My goal is
a reasonable amount of effort will make Brett's coffee free to me...
Regards,
Brett
  Zassman
     Yep, I buy zasses and trossers online, fix em and sell em sightly
abopve cost - pelpe like to grind what they buy from me...
On 3/12/06, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

3) From:
Hi:
This is not inappropriate at all. Many here roast to sell in a variety of way Ann.
I started out just roasting for a few friends and then at my local Framer's Market on the weekends. I sell more beans at the market only due to the fact that I have a larger population around at one time when I am roasting. I actually roast at the market.
I have been out of comission for a couple of months but will start again in another week as a guest chef at the Phoenix Public Market on Saturdays from 8 until 2...
When I started selling I  would just sell what I liked. It always sold. I would get orders for more or a coffee similar or a completely different coffee it the drinkers were spirited enough to try different coffee's. I did get a huge sack of plain old Columbian since 60 percent wanted it.
I sold it all but have decided that I want to stick with Tom's beans since they are always great. I can now buy larger amounts such as the 10 pounders which is perfect.
I can up the price since most folks "expect" to pay more for fresh roasted greens.
I am going to do a glass for the Scottsdale Community program and am busy trying to put it together.
I would start out selling what you like. You can get bags from many sources. You are limited to the n umber you can buy from Tom. I have a list of sources if you want to email me off list at thebeanbabe
regards,
ginny
<Snip>

4) From: Aaron
brett is that pound the weight before you roast it or after?
aaron

5) From: an iconoclast
On 3/12/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks, Brett. The samples are the hook. I was hoping to find a home
roasting buddy with those samples, but they just want to buy it
already roasted.  So my newest passion has turned into a bit more than
a hobby.  And today is my first anniversary of home roasting!
Take care,
Ann

6) From: Peter Zulkowski
I take orders,
but I only have two customers, and they always want the same thing.
PeterZ
Wishing for more customers, here in LHC
an iconoclast wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Brett Mason
I always look at it from the buyers perspective.
   1 lb = roasted beans, prior to placing in the bag.
I use a balance scale to get it right.
Does that help?
Regards,
Brett
On 3/12/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

8) From: Brett Mason
By the way, there's a thread started as well on selling your coffee -
take a look at homeroasters.org:http://homeroasters.org/php/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=13&thread_id==172
Cheers,
Brett
  Zassman
On 3/12/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

9) From: Brett Mason
Ginny likes those construction hunks - that's why she sells at the
Framer's Market...
Big, bold coffee no doubt too..
Brett
On 3/12/06, beanzebub  wrote:
<Snip>
 way Ann.
<Snip>
's Market on the weekends. I sell more beans at the market only due to the =
fact that I have a larger population around at one time when I am roasting.=
 I actually roast at the market.
<Snip>
in another week as a guest chef at the Phoenix Public Market on Saturdays f=
rom 8 until 2...
<Snip>
 would get orders for more or a coffee similar or a completely different co=
ffee it the drinkers were spirited enough to try different coffee's. I did =
get a huge sack of plain old Columbian since 60 percent wanted it.
<Snip>
e they are always great. I can now buy larger amounts such as the 10 pounde=
rs which is perfect.
<Snip>
d greens.
<Snip>
 trying to put it together.
<Snip>
es. You are limited to the n umber you can buy from Tom. I have a list of s=
ources if you want to email me off list at thebeanbabe
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

10) From: Brett Mason
Here's a how-to tip when you buy your beans:
Sweet Marias' beans compete in price with other bulk vendors when you
buy three (3) of the 20lb bags - the shopping cart system gets it
right, and the price allows a very fair profit.  This is why I buy in
the 60lb range for most orders...
Regards,
Brett
On 3/12/06, beanzebub  wrote:
<Snip>
 way Ann.
<Snip>
's Market on the weekends. I sell more beans at the market only due to the =
fact that I have a larger population around at one time when I am roasting.=
 I actually roast at the market.
<Snip>
in another week as a guest chef at the Phoenix Public Market on Saturdays f=
rom 8 until 2...
<Snip>
 would get orders for more or a coffee similar or a completely different co=
ffee it the drinkers were spirited enough to try different coffee's. I did =
get a huge sack of plain old Columbian since 60 percent wanted it.
<Snip>
e they are always great. I can now buy larger amounts such as the 10 pounde=
rs which is perfect.
<Snip>
d greens.
<Snip>
 trying to put it together.
<Snip>
es. You are limited to the n umber you can buy from Tom. I have a list of s=
ources if you want to email me off list at thebeanbabe
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

11) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-95-770895528
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I don't dare sell at my Farmer's Market...not with Metropolis down  
the block!!!
On Mar 13, 2006, at 3:29 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-95-770895528
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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	charsetO-8859-1
I don't dare sell at my Farmer's =
Market...not with Metropolis down the block!!!
On Mar 13, =
2006, at 3:29 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
Ginny likes those construction hunks - that's why = she sells at theFramer's Market... Big, = bold coffee no doubt too.. On 3/12/06, beanzebub <beanzebub> wrote: = Hi: This is = not inappropriate at all. Many here roast to sell in a variety of way = Ann. I started out just roasting for a few friends and = then at my local Framer's Market on the weekends. I sell more beans at = the market only due to the fact that I have a larger population around = at one time when I am roasting. I actually roast at the = market. I have been out of comission for a couple of months = but will start again in another week as a guest chef at the Phoenix = Public Market on Saturdays from 8 until 2... When I = started selling I  would = just sell what I liked. It always sold. I would get orders for more or a = coffee similar or a completely different coffee it the drinkers were = spirited enough to try different coffee's. I did get a huge sack of = plain old Columbian since 60 percent wanted it. I sold = it all but have decided that I want to stick with Tom's beans since they = are always great. I can now buy larger amounts such as the 10 pounders = which is perfect. I can up the price since most folks "expect" to pay = more for fresh roasted greens. I am going to do a glass for the = Scottsdale Community program and am busy trying to put it = together. I would start out selling what you like. You can get = bags from many sources. You are limited to the n umber you can buy from = Tom. I have a list of sources if you want to email me off list at thebeanbabe ginny From: = "an iconoclast" <an.iconoclast>Date: 2006/03/12 Sun AM 10:36:36 PSTTo: homeroast= s.comSubject: +Selling small = quantities of home roasted coffee For those who sell some of their = home roasted coffee:How do you choose what greens to = purchase?  How much do = you roast?  Doyou take orders or do they buy what you have?  How do you package = it? If not appropriate for the mailing list, I would = appreciate advice offline.  I had saved some messages = related to this, but I have to sayGoogle mail = is crap for filing and saving stuff.  Delete one messagein the thread and it's all gone even though I've = starred it andarchived it. Thanks = so much.  My brain is = hurting with all this thinking! Annhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings --Regards,Brett = Mason HomeRoast      = __]_   _(( )_  Please don't spill the = coffee!homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-95-770895528--

12) From: Jane Hill
I am assuming, and hoping, that everyone selling "small quantities of 
home roasted coffee" knows that they need a business license.  :-\

13) From: Aaron
You shouldn't need a business license if you are selling at a flea 
market I don't think.  Don't you just have to pay your few dollars for 
the booth and that's that?  It'd be like a fancy garage sale or a craft 
sale or something like that Id think.
Granted if one is doing it full time they might want a business license 
but for an occasional thing is it actually mandatory to have a license 
or will this vary from state to state?
Aaron

14) From: National Prison Consultants
....and insurance for the customer claiming to have contracted some rare
tropical disease from consuming your gratuitous gift of HR.  Remember, there
may be a shortage of Kona and JBM, but there is no shortage of lawyers
looking to sue someone for some silly reason.

15) From: Geary Lyons
Well not necessarily. Depends on jurisdiction.  Generally not at Farmer's
Markets because they are of a transitory nature and primarily sell food
products, which in most jurisdictions are not assessed sales or use tax.
Most states require a seller's or resale permit primarily to assess if sales
or use tax is collected and by whom. If one were to establish a retail
location, most likely. Selling to a few friends? Doubtful.
Always best to check with the powers that be if you are concerned.
Cheers,
Geary

16) From: Brett Mason
Recommended:
  Figure out how much you plan to sell, figure out where, then call
the office which has jurisdiction, and ask them for guidelines on
business volume, etc.  As long as you are looking at business
licensing, may as well get a reseller's permit and buy supplies
wholesale...
Good luck,
Brett
On 3/13/06, Jane Hill  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

17) From: Peter Schmidt
In Milwaukee, I asked a city health inspector who checks up on restaurants.
He said that since I'd be roasting and selling a 'food item' I'd need to be
roasting in an inspected and up-to-code establishment.  It would be doubtful
that this would be possible in one's home, as it's a residence in a
non-commercial zoned building.
Our Wisconsin laws allow for up to $600 in sales before any earnings need to
be reported as income.
If you tie all this together, the need for health inspection, up to all
applicable codes, sales tax, income tax, FICA, insurances......  there's no
way a home-roaster could even think about going above the table.
If they ever lock me up, my loyal following having been deprived of their
precious beans will come and bust me out!
Anonymous (pay no attention to the name on the header)
Recommended:
  Figure out how much you plan to sell, figure out where, then call
the office which has jurisdiction, and ask them for guidelines on
business volume, etc.  As long as you are looking at business
licensing, may as well get a reseller's permit and buy supplies
wholesale...
Good luck,
Brett
On 3/13/06, Jane Hill  wrote:
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

18) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Most, if not all, health departments WILL NOT ALLOW you to sell food that was 
prepared in your home kitchen.  Witness B&B's which have to have a separate (and 
inspected) kitchen for guests from the owner's kitchen.
I know of no 'business license', perhaps that varies from state to state.
Besides a certified kitchen, you may need a resaler's license even if you then 
report no taxable income.  Best to check first.  I know that state officials 
will roam a flea market event asking to see everyone's resale certificate.  If 
you don't have one you must buy one on the spot form them or tear down your 
booth.
The reason I know this is because I'm a mfgr., we sell at flea markets, and I've 
checked with my county health department about what I need to roast and sell 
coffee.
Fore warned is fore armed,  Dan

19) From: Michael Wascher
Dan,
In Ohio, every business is required to have a "business license". They're
administered by the county. Cost is a modest annual fee. You get a numbered
scrap of paper, the license, that is to be displayed at your place of
business and a couple of wallet size cards. They have your "tax number" on
it, which is required to buy items for resale, without paying sales tax. Yo=
u
are required to file quarterly reports of sales & tax collected. When you
file you include a check to forward the sales tax you collected to the
state.
I'm sure they have something similar in most states, though implementation =
&
name may differ.
--MikeW
On 3/13/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
I know of no 'business license', perhaps that varies from state to state.
<Snip>
--
"Life is just one damned thing after another."
  - Elbert Hubbard

20) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Roasted coffee is a food item, true, but I thought there were special 
circumstances for Farmers Markets. Maybe I am confused, because you 
certainly wouldn't want to buy, for example, home processed chicken 
(mmm, avian flu central!) from a market with no assurance of 
cleanliness/sanitary practices. You can get food poisoning from 
coffee, like many other things that you would not suspect (isn't ice 
actually a top source, because people do not suspect it).
Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

21) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike,  Sounds like a  state resell certificate that is used to collect =
and pay taxes with. Indiana has no business licensing requirement. I =
just checked with the state website and it say, "Indiana does not have =
any one single, comprehensive business license."  It then goes on to =
talk about a tax account and resell certificate.  Dan
  Dan,
  In Ohio, every business is required to have a "business license". =
They're administered by the county. Cost is a modest annual fee. You get =
a numbered scrap of paper, the license, that is to be displayed at your =
place of business and a couple of wallet size cards. They have your "tax =
number" on it, which is required to buy items for resale, without paying =
sales tax. You are required to file quarterly reports of sales & tax =
collected. When you file you include a check to forward the sales tax =
you collected to the state.
  I'm sure they have something similar in most states, though =
implementation & name may differ.
  --MikeW
  On 3/13/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
    > In Milwaukee, I asked a city health inspector who checks up on =
restaurants.
    I know of no 'business license', perhaps that varies from state to =
state.
  -- 
  "Life is just one damned thing after another."
    - Elbert Hubbard 

22) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Tom, I wouldn't be surprised. And remember, many of the items sold in Farmer's 
Markets are not processed food. They are simply picked and sold. Since there is 
no preparation for fresh tomatoes, corn, cantalope, etc. then there is no need 
for a kitchen, certified or not. It's a moot point.
When I talked with my county health department I specifically mentioned wanting 
to sell at the Farmer's Market downtown, and just a few blocks from his office. 
He said I'd need a county inspected kitchen before I could sell any roasted 
coffee anywhere in the county, including at the Farmer's Market. He said the 
health of the county citizens is more important than my convenience.  I agreed.
It's not a big deal.  All you need is what he called a 'caterers kitchen', which 
is smooth clean walls, moppable floor, 3-hole clean-up sink large enough for the 
largest item you need to wash, a separate hand-wash sink and nearby bathroom. 
All items that touch the food must be SS, glass or NSF compliant.  Dan

23) From: Randolph Wilson
<Snip>
I would hope that you realize that the law in 50 states and many 
thousands of localities varies dramatically.  Not all of the country 
is so overreaching (yet).
Perhaps parade precipitation is your preferred practice?
<Snip>

24) From: Michael Stock
Farmers Markets definately also sell baked goods (or every farmers market
I've been to has).  In New Mexico, they also do fresh roasted green chile
both at the farmers markets and outside the grocery stores in the fall (the
rest of you states are probably deprived of the wonderfulness that is fresh
roasted green chile, it's done with a setup very similar to an RK drum but
bigger), usually roasted by people who speak little to no english.  It seem=
s
hard to believe that all these people have a 'inspected kitchen' to cook in=
,
especially with the green chile roasters.  On the other hand, New Mexico is
one of the more backward states.
--mike
On 3/13/06, Randolph Wilson  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Rich Adams

26) From: Matthew Price
On 3/13/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
, which
<Snip>
for the
<Snip>
oom.
<Snip>
Aren't some commercial drums plain steel?
Matthew

27) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
<Snip>
Yes, I believe some are.  Dan

28) From: Matthew Price
One of those don't ask don't tell kinda things, I guess.  From what
others have said over on the roasters guild bbs, food inspections are
just the stuff you need to wade through.  Things like the 3 tub
sink+hand wash sink+mop sink and storage sterile enough to birth
babies on don't really apply to coffee, but that's what government is
for, right? :)
You can't really 'slip' into commercial roasting.  There's a lot of
up-front costs and hastle that will require you roast a lot of beans
down the line to cover.  Keep quiet if you want to stick to just your
bbq drum and circle of friends.
Matthew
On 3/14/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

29) From: Tom Bellhouse
Rich,
Fire codes might be your biggest problem.  I thought about demonstrating
glassblowing with a portable rig but the code restrictions were
formitable.  That said, lots of local craft fairs allow individuals and
civic groups to set up BarBQs, so the RK drum rig might be OK too.
Tom in GA

30) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Okay, one more email on this (we are probably flogging it to death 
and basically everyone agrees). But I think the ethics of selling to 
a circle of friends and to the wider public via farmers 
market/ebay/etc are different. Theres a point where you owe it to 
people to assure safe food handling, no matter how common sense, 
nomatter how much jumping bureaucratic hoops is ridiculous. I think 
Matthew hits it with the casual circle of friends thing (where there 
is trust/responsibility because people know you personally) versus 
other forms of selling. It does make me take pause about some ebay 
roasted coffee where they roast in their garage etc. I mean, there 
are some bad things you can be doing to coffee in a bbq (like 
exposing it to bad effluence of unburned fuel, chemical taint from 
cleaners) or in bagging the roasted ... garages are not food handling 
spaces. BTW - most roasters use NSF plastic barrels, that is BRUTE 
type trash cans either lined with food poly bags or not. One of the 
bad things with this is keeping the stale old coffee oils from 
tainting the next batch. I use NSF food bins and use a clean cloth to 
remove oils after each use, then a special food cleaner with water to 
get rid of any unseen buildup after a few uses, and air dry. The bins 
are always covered, with or without coffee in them. We bag coffee 
right after roasting so nothing sits in a bin, but whats to say a 
spider doesnt fall into an uncovered bin and die there ...mmmm! Also, 
when we receive back some glass item broken in transit, I have seen 
glass bits get on the floor- whats to say some could not get into an 
uncovered bin. Anyway, there are lots of things that can happen even 
in a very safe food service place - things hard to forsee - imagine 
the things that can happen in a home garage
Okay - now I am just being neurotic...
Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

31) From: Ebeneneezer Shay
ahh, fresh green chile. Thats the stuff!
I live in Las Cruces (NM), it is to chile, what Sweet Marias is to coffee!
My stepfather is a health inspector here, was in Arizona and Colorado
as well. All of the commentary about the "Regs." is true for most
states. You really need the environment described in this thread even
out at events<-- key word is events. Farmers Market is usually a
variable defined by each states statutes, but is always a special
case, especially in heavy Ag states. Further if you call your local
health department (always state run, like a state agency), and if you
get the regulations nazi just try back later. Usually you can wind up
talking to someone that is willing to give you information with out
starting an indictment. Here there are an abundance of what we call
"Roach Coatches" that sell burritos and the like and they all have
three bowl SS sinks, seperate hand washing, etc. Meanwhile the chile
roasters do it in the parking lot and put the end product in a nappy
looking burlap sack lined with a trash bag using modified shovels!!! I
am sure if you look closely there are caveats in your local system to
work around as long as you are small potatos and don't work outside
the caveat.
BTW- I have been experimenting with an 80% - 20% blend of Ethiopian
Ghimbi and the 2ond place Faz Araras. It works well with either being
dominant, this is a very long lasting cup. The flavor just progresses
as you drink it for a long while!!  Mmmmm!!!
--Ebeneezer
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2006 10:52:25 -0700
From: "Michael Stock" 
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Selling small quantities of home roasted coffee
Reply-To: homeroast
Farmers Markets definately also sell baked goods (or every farmers market
I've been to has).  In New Mexico, they also do fresh roasted green chile
both at the farmers markets and outside the grocery stores in the fall (the
rest of you states are probably deprived of the wonderfulness that is fresh
roasted green chile, it's done with a setup very similar to an RK drum but
bigger), usually roasted by people who speak little to no english.  It seem=
=
s
hard to believe that all these people have a 'inspected kitchen' to cook in=
=
,
especially with the green chile roasters.  On the other hand, New Mexico is
one of the more backward states.
--mike

32) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 3/14/06, Ebeneneezer Shay  wrote:
<Snip>
!
Make mine green, please....
Brian "chile stash nearly gone" Kamnetz

33) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 In this little rural British Columbia town the usual
inpected kitchen only for food products also applies, but
I've made a living selling home roasted coffee for 6 years.
My wood fired brick oven bakery was shut down pretty quick
because there was a local bakery, and they complained to
the health dept. There is no local comercial roasting
company, and coffee is considered a "non hazardous" food
item, so until they get that oficial complaint we're ok-so
far. The health inspecter is a good customer. I have a
kitchen building that's pretty much up to code, but I still
don't know if my RK drum can be set up safely and legaly in
there.For now all the greens and roasted beans are stored
there, no junk or dangerous chemicals etc., no bugs or
mice. The coffee is roasted out on my porch, though....not
legal. My cooling box has stainless screen on the bottom ,
but wood sides.  Good thing about coffee, though--no sales
tax on it unless brewed and sold that way. No duty or sales
tax bringing greens into Canada.
 The income tax folks get the expenses and profits details,
but they aren't connected to the health inspecters. It's
the weights and measures guys that are more likely to come
after me some day when checking the packaging in some store
I sell to. My scale is not inspected and sealed,my cash
register is a cardboard box,and my labels might not have
every detail in the right spot acording to their codes.
      shhhhh,
  Charlie
--- Peter Schmidt  wrote:
<Snip>
                                         Oaxaca dreamin'
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

34) From: Ed Needham
I spend nine years working to design stores for a very well known fast food
company.  I have been in hundreds of kitchens that 'pass' health inspections
and are deemed 'commercial kitchens' over the years.  I'd place the
sanitation of my roaster/workshop against just about any of those
'commercial kitchens' any day of the week, my three roasting dogs included.
Even with what I've seen, I still eat fast food, but avoid anything that
gets handled and not dropped into a 375F fryer.  I definitely don't do fast
food salads or tacos.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
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35) From: Aaron
I could tell you horror stories about some of the stuff i have seen at 
Arby's.. but ill save your stomachs..  needless to say I will never ever 
eat at an arby's ever again..  P.S.  don't trust the deep fat fryer either.
Aaron


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