HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee Storage (66 msgs / 1458 lines)
1) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
I stumbled on the following recommendation on the CaffeRosto.com site:
"Caffe Rosto storage tips:
Place your beans in an airtight container and store them in a cool dry
place. This will allow them to remain fresh for a year or more.
Vacuum sealing large quantities of beans will keep them fresh for years."
We are storing our green beans the traditional way, in burlap or other
fabric bags; in "elevated well ventilated open bins" in coolish, dry and
somewhat dark place inside our home. Would vacuum sealing (in plastic bags)
be a better green bean storing method?  Why, or why not?
Ken Davids wrote on page 106 of his "Home Coffee Roasting" about deliberate
aging:
If you live in the tropics, however, or close to them, you may conduct a few
experiments of your own. Put some good green coffee in burlap, put it on a
pallet in the carport, where the ventilation is good, and rotate the bags
occasionally. Then write to me in time for my next book."
Has anybody tried it?  Is the "hot and often humid" Texas Hill Country
"close to tropic" conditions?
Regards, Lubos in the Texas Hill Country part of Austin
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2) From: floyd burton
If you seal them up and get condensation-that is not good.  Best storage
would be in a relatively low humidity and not excessive heat with air
circulating around them.  I guess a partial vacuum would also work.  Tom has
said several times he is really antsy about buying beans that have been
stored in really hot and humid places like New Orleans with SF being an
optimal climate.  I still remember living in Atlanta and people having UV
lights in their closets to keep their shoes from getting covered with
mildew.  This was back before the days of AC.  If beans get moist, many
different molds can and will grow.  I sell hospital air purification systems
and you would really cringe if you knew all the nasty things swimming around
in supposedly clean outside air.  Just do not give the nasties a place and
conditions to set up house keeping and your beans will be "cool".

3) From: Steve D - Kc4rkf

4) From: John Blumel
On 7/26/01 5:22 PM, Steve D - Kc4rkf wrote:
<Snip>
Wow, where'd you get the 1/2 gal and 1 gal ones? How much green can you 
fit in each size?
John Blumel
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5) From: Steve
One thing I have found that works really well are the large (2 qt or
larger), plastic juice bottles. The lids have a nice seal and they hold
about 3#s or more.
steve
In Seattle
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6) From: Irene and Lubos Palounek
Until tonight, I did not know that Half-Gallon and Gallon Mason Jars
existed. A simple Google.com search shows some sources for BallŪ Half-Gallon
Wide Mouth Mason Jars. They seem to be popular for dry or vacuum storage and
for quick vacuum marinating. However, I could not find anything about One
gallon Mason Jars. Where do you buy them?
Cheers, Lubos
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7) From: Gary Zimmerman
 
floyd burton wrote:
<Snip>
What about monsooned beans?
-- garyZ
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8) From: Steve D - Kc4rkf

9) From: Monty Harris
At 07:19 PM 7/26/01 -0500, John wrote:
<Snip>
Doesn't everyone buy pickled eggs in gallon jugs?
;0)
Monty
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10) From: John Blumel
Approximately how many lbs of green coffee can one fit per quart of
jar?
John Blumel
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11) From: Mike & Debi McGinness
<Snip>
I just filled a 1qt mason jar with Sumatra Tawar greens (first bag I grabbed) to see, emptied out to
my Postage Scale @ 22.6 oz which equals 1.41 pounds...
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver USA
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12) From: Richard Estes
Hi All;
Just a couple of questions on coffee storage;
fresh roast, I am planning on modifying 1 gal. glass jars by placing a
vacuum wine jar cap in the lid, not sure that you have seen them, but they
are rubber "corks" with a one-way valve, then there is a little suction
plunger that fits over the cork to suck air through the valve.  This way I
will be able to remove and air that is in the jar and vacuum seal the beans
between uses. I will also be able to pull out any "gas" the fresh roasted
beans give off.
Green; I have read that green coffee beans need no special storage
requirements, is this true?
Thanks
Richard Estes
<Snip>
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13) From: Steve Shank
How long were you planning to store it? I generally remove the beans from=
 the plastic containers and use the 35 cent cloth ones. Not sure there is=
 any reason to. I roast it fresh a couple of times a week, and so don't=
 bother about worrying how fresh roasted are stored. I use mason jars, but=
 it's gone in a week.
My calculations are like this: 1 year is totally safe by anyone's standard=
 for green bean storage. I give Tom 6 months and take 6 months myself. So I=
 try not to order more than I'll drink within 6 months. Really not too hard=
 and lets me try new stuff as it comes out. I tend to order some every=
 couple of months.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 02/12/2002 at 4:04 PM Richard Estes wrote:
<Snip>
 beans
<Snip>
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Richard Estes
Hi Steve;
I have a pretty large lot (5#) of roasted that I need to store long term,
that's why I was thinking of vacuum sealing it. On the green beans, my
concern with storing in cloth bags is that they may pick up odors of things
around them, but perhaps they have enough oil to "seal" against stuff like
that.(?)
Richard
<Snip>
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15) From: The Scarlet Wombat
I would not recommend storing roasted coffee for more than a week, the 
whole point of roasting is to get the coffee at the flavor peak.
The problem with the vacuum units is the same for coffee as for wine.  When 
you draw off most of the air, (saying it is a vacuum is inaccurate), you 
allow the more volatile oils to emerge from the beans or wine and they are 
destroyed.
If you need long term storage of several pounds, I would recommend getting 
a can of inert gas from a wine store, I forget the brands available, but 
the gas is usually a mixture of nitrogen and carbon dioxide.  Place the 
beans in the jar, gas them with a generous amount, shake them up with the 
lid on, gas them again and they will probably be reasonably good for 
several months if kept in a dark place and if the jar's lid is truly airtight.
The real bottom line is that after about ten days from roasting, no matter 
what you do, they will never be quite as good as they once were.  Give it 
away to peoplw who love good coffee. [smile]
Dan
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16) From: The Scarlet Wombat
I would not recommend storing roasted coffee for more than a week, the 
whole point of roasting is to get the coffee at the flavor peak.
The problem with the vacuum units is the same for coffee as for wine.  When 
you draw off most of the air, (saying it is a vacuum is inaccurate), you 
allow the more volatile oils to emerge from the beans or wine and they are 
destroyed.
If you need long term storage of several pounds, I would recommend getting 
a can of inert gas from a wine store, I forget the brands available, but 
the gas is usually a mixture of nitrogen and carbon dioxide.  Place the 
beans in the jar, gas them with a generous amount, shake them up with the 
lid on, gas them again and they will probably be reasonably good for 
several months if kept in a dark place and if the jar's lid is truly airtight.
The real bottom line is that after about ten days from roasting, no matter 
what you do, they will never be quite as good as they once were.  Give it 
away to peoplw who love good coffee. [smile]
Dan
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

17) From:
Hey list, 
In your experienced opinions, what is the best way to store roasted coffee?  Would it be in Mason Jars, or the gold valve bags from SM's?  
And if it is Mason Jars, should u wash them before putting different coffee in them?
<Snip>

18) From: Tim TenClay
I use mason Jars with plastic lids - they're cheap, resuable and I
write on them with a wax pencil/thingey.  I label each jar with the
bean, date and how long it took to roast it.  (The wax stuff comes off
REALLY well with a drop of goo gone.)
I use a 1/2 pint jar for about 100 grams or less and a 1 pint jar for
more and run them through the dishwasher every so often.  (Usually I
wipe them out with a dry coffee filter before I put fresh beans in
them, it grabs the oil pretty well.  I always use a paper filter to
measure my greans before roasting them so I have it handy when I'm
ready to wipe out the jar.)
If it matters, I put the beans in the jars quite warm.  Place the lids
on (not tightened) and tighten the lids after they cool.
Hope it helps!
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
-- 
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253

19) From: Wandering Curmudgeon
Matt
  I use vacuum sealed bags and/or vacuum sealed mason jars.  The
FoodSaver  does the work on the bags and the mason
jars.   The Mason Jars are the small jars that just hold 1/4 pound. 
If you don't have a vacuum device then I'd opt for the valve bags - a
little more expensive but a positive seal - with outgassing port built
in.
   In all cases - clean the container after use -some of the oils are
very light and hard to see, but will eventually turn rancid and spoil
the contents when reused.
John - loving life and La Pluma doubles in my mini mug
On 6/3/05, matt633  wrote:
<Snip>
e?  Would it be in Mason Jars, or the gold valve bags from SM's?
<Snip>
ee in them?
<Snip>

20) From: Wandering Curmudgeon
On 6/3/05, Wandering Curmudgeon  wrote:
<Snip>
fee?  Would it be in Mason Jars, or the gold valve bags from SM's?
<Snip>
ffee in them?
<Snip>

21) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
I use both - mason jars (definitely cleaned and for short-term
storage) and the valved bags from SM (for gifts).
I also use the FoodSaver vac jars for longer storage (over a week). 
They came out with a handheld vac (just for the jars, not for bags)
last year and it works really well.  Fill the jar with beans, put on
the lid, let rest for a day, then vac seal.
They all work really well for different uses.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
For a Drip/Moka/Presspot Brew
On 6/3/05, matt633  wrote:
<Snip>
e?  Would it be in Mason Jars, or the gold valve bags from SM's?
<Snip>
ee in them?

22) From: Rick Copple
matt633 wrote:
<Snip>
Just to toss in another post to this...
I use the gold valve bags to store in. I put a piece of masking tape on 
the bag and write on it the type of coffee, roast level and date of 
roast. Works good for me! I usually bag the air popper roast shortly 
after cooling down, but the wok roast I tend to let sit out for a few 
hours as I've found that it helps them to degas better, at least in my 
experience. Then I bag them.
Works well for me.
<Snip>
I do wipe out the bags with a paper towel before putting new coffee in, 
and I rotate the bags by occasionally giving away some coffee in one, 
and occasionally ordering some new ones from SM. As a matter of fact, 
the order I put in last weekend I meant to get some more but forgot to 
include them in my non-Harvey order. Darn!
-- 
Rick Copple
Marble Falls, TX

23) From: MMore
As at least some of you are aware, I am in the process of opening up a coffee 
shop.  However, as I mentioned before, if these questions are not appropriate 
for this forum, please let me know and I'll ask them off line.  Or, you can 
always answer me off-line so it doesn't clutter up this board.
My question is this....
What methods have you all seen for proper display and storage in coffee 
houses you've been to?  I'm seeking that nice mix of aesthetically pleasing with 
keeping the beans fresh.  I've seen the big jars with lids, but I'm not so sure 
this keeps the freshly roasted beans their freshest. 
Thanks, everyone for all your help and the support I've already received.
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna, Va.

24) From: Matthew Price
On 7/11/05, MMore  wrote:
<Snip>
. 
<Snip>
. 
<Snip>
ng
<Snip>
not
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
Is this for beans you are going to brew in the store, or stock waiting
to be sold in bags?
For beans to be brewed in the store, I would hope your throughput
would mean that nothing could stale.  Let the freshest batches sit out
in whatever kind of case would best display them while they rest. 
About the only reason I wander through the Gloria Jeans at the mall is
to ogle the plastic-faced hoppers - and to check prices so I can
impress my wife with my savings :) .
The same principle - only having enough to not worry about freshness -
/should/ apply to bean sales, but it probably won't.  In Chicago, the
Coffee and Tea exchange has a raised island in the middle of the shop
that has barrels with the beans inside.  The barrels - probably about
2' in diameter and 4' tall - have plastic liners (nsf cert trash bags)
and lexan lids.  They do a brisk and well deserved business, so not
much staling there.  This is very attractive and definitely adds some
charm to the shop.  Manage your stock levels as best you can so that
you don't have as much of the slow selling beans.  Establish a maximum
sit time for the beans.
Matt

25) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I agree with Matt that this is a nice display method.  The one thing that I 
worry about is  the damage that can be done by slovenly help when you're 
not watching them closely.  What I fear is dumping fresh beans in on top of 
older ones.  Easy to say "it wouldn't happen," but I don't like a setup 
where it is all too easy for stuff like that to happen.  Which is one 
reason why the old(er) fashioned visible storage where beans go in one end 
and come out the other is preferable, I think.  With that arrangement there 
is no way to cover up older beans with new.
Gene Smith
threading the wild learning curve, in Houston

26) From: MMore
In a message dated 7/11/2005 3:55:28 PM Eastern Standard Time,  
gene writes:
 
I was thinking of having two areas - a "we're resting" area where beans  
would go first and then a "ready to serve" area.  The only problem with  this is 
space.  My shop is only 1500 sf total area.  The architect  hasn't worked up 
the "usable space" calculations just yet, but I'm guessing it's  going to be 
somewhere in the 1000 to 1100 sq ft. range.
 
agree  with Matt that this is a nice display method.  The one thing that I  
worry about is  the damage that can be done by slovenly help when  you're 
not watching them closely.  What I fear is dumping fresh beans  in on top of 
older ones.  Easy to say "it wouldn't happen," but I  don't like a setup 
where it is all too easy for stuff like that to  happen.  Which is one 
reason why the old(er) fashioned visible  storage where beans go in one end 
and come out the other is preferable, I  think.  With that arrangement there 
is no way to cover up older beans  with new.
Gene Smith
threading the wild learning curve, in Houston  
Michael A. Roaster of Vienna,  Va.

27) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
One thought I had and did not enunciate, Michael, is that if you used an 
"in at the top - out at the bottom" storage method, you could place markers 
in the tube (chute, pipe) that would indicate the date/time they went 
in...that way you would always know just how long they had been in there. 
This would be kinda colorful, handy for you, and reassuring to your 
customers.  I always appreciate a shop that clearly indicates when 
something was roasted.
Also, if you could get the "flow rate" approximately right, it would 
definitely save on storage space.
Just another madcap thought from Houston, where the sky just fell (as in 
rain) (as in Flaming Monsoon).
Gene Smith

28) From: Tim TenClay
Can I make a suggestion?
How about starting a frequent buyers' club?!  The Local Brew Pub, here
in Holland, MI, has a Mug Club where that you buy into (all your
in-house beer purchases give you a dollar off!).  You get a mug with
your name engraved on it (it looks like a mason Jar with a handle). 
Of course, they also sell growlers where you can buy a half a gallon
of beer for a reduced price to take home.
You could do the same thing.  For a price, get someone's name engraved
on a mason Jar (or look alike).  Print up a bunch of lids (with your
logo and address) and fill the jar with freshly roasted beans for a
preset (and slightly reduced) price.  Most people don't need more than
a full mason Jar for a couple of days or even a week.  They break the
jar, they buy a new one.
It would be envoronmentally friendly, reusable, cool, and give you
automatic brand loyalty....
I know it's not related to the in-store storage question (although you
could do the same thing with 1/2-gallon or 1-gallon jars instore.) 
But I think it'd be cool.
Grace and PEace,
  `tim
-- 
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253

29) From: Cedrick Stanton
MMore wrote:
<Snip>
How much coffee do you need to store, and how long do you plan on 
storing it?
Ideally, you would sell your roasted coffee quick enough that it 
wouldn't be a huge issue.
One coffee shop in Berkeley, CA had a system where there was some 
display coffee in a glass jar, but when you bought coffee it was kept in 
a separate opaque storage container.  I always thought that was a good 
system.
   --Cedrick

30) From: Alchemist John
At 12:53 7/11/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Or put a padlock on it - talk about locking in freshness :-) Seriously.
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

31) From: Gerald and Beth Newsom
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Do mason jars work well for storing roasted coffee beans?  I have a =
large collection of pint-sized mason jars and seem to be collecting an =
equally large number of different kinds of roasted coffee beans.
Gerald

32) From: Zara Haimo
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I use mason jars, both pint and quart sized, for my roasted beans.   =
After I roast, I put the beans in mason jars and simply screw the lids =
on.  A few hours later, I vacuum seal the lids (if I did it sooner, the =
outgassing would immediately break the vacuum).  After that, each time I =
take beans out, I reseal the lids.  I have a vacuum sealer with a jar =
attachment and use that to seal the lids - takes a few seconds to do. 

33) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Gerald,
They work perfect, as do the quart jars. The vac sealers with the jar lid 
attachments also help to keep the beans at their freshest.
Bob

34) From: Gerald and Beth Newsom
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
So, I just need to find a vacuum sealer with a jar attachment?  I =
haven't even heard of that before, but I will certainly be looking for =
one now.  Thanks for your help, Zara and Bob!
Gerald

35) From: Demian Ebert
A lot of folks vacuum seal their beans, but I'd hazard a guess there are
quite a few that don't. I store roasted beans in small jars w/o vacuum
sealing them. I don't have a vacuum sealer and beans generally don't last
long enough to get even close to stale. Most of my greens are either in the
cotton bags from SMs or in the ziplocs they are shipped in.
Just had to offer a counter-point of view.
Demian
On 2/7/06, Gerald and Beth Newsom  wrote:
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
ew
<Snip>

36) From: Lissa
On Tue, 7 Feb 2006 10:26:15 -0600, Gerald and Beth Newsom wrote
<Snip>
Yes, just keep them out of direct sunlight. Doesn't hurt to open them after
24-48 hours to let the CO2 out, too.
Be well,
Lissa

37) From: Brian Kamnetz
I'm idly wondering, has anyone ever done side-by-side comparisons of
roasted beans kept in mason jars with vacuum seal vs. those without
vacuum seal? I'm wondering how long the beans have to be stored before
the vacuum makes a significant difference.
Brian
On 2/7/06, Gerald and Beth Newsom  wrote:
<Snip>
r I
<Snip>

38) From: Sue
I store my greens in the cotton or burlap SM bags and my roasted beas in
mason jars. I don't vacuum seal mine. I roast once a week and the beans hav=
e
plenty of flavor for me.  I guess if I pt them around longer I might
consider it. Maybe I have a dulled sense of taste, I don't know.......
sue
On 2/7/06, Lissa  wrote:
<Snip>

39) From: Aaron
I keep my roasted coffee in these twist top canisters you can get from 
ziploc.  They are quite convinient and just the right size.  I rarely 
have roasted coffee around enough to start getting nasty,  typically two 
weeks to 3 at outside tops is all my roast will last on a slow week.
My greens, I keep in the cloth bags from sweet marias, or as someone 
else mentioned, the plastic baggies SM's ships them in when I am out of 
cotton bags.
So far I have not noticed any ill effects from either.
Aaron

40) From: Aaron
Brian I will add another twist to that.
Mason jars are not really a vaccuum seal, but just an airtight seal.  
Granted there may be a slight vaccuum created as the beans fully cool, 
but the amount will be insignificant to really be called vaccuum sealing.
I will try an experiment here.
I will roast up a batch of coffee and split it into 3 containers.
1. screw top container, not really airtight
2. a mason jar, not really vaccuum container but airtight
3. a jar with a professional vaccuum sealer that I can acutally put them 
under a deep vaccuum and store them that way.
I will let them set a week, and taste all 3 to see if I can tell any 
major difference between them.  Note: My taste buds are probably 
comparable to those of a peasant in regards to knowing all the 'things' 
that make up the flavor of coffee but I will do my best to see if I can 
taste any noticeable difference.  Ill do a writeup as well as to if any 
group of beans 'oiled' more than others, etc etc etc.
How's that sound?
Aaron

41) From: Gerald and Beth Newsom
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hmmmm, so maybe I can go ahead and store them in my mason jars for the =
time being anyway.  If I run across a vacuum sealer with a jar =
attachment and I can afford it, I'll be forced to make a decision.   :-)
Thanks,
Gerald

42) From: Gerald and Beth Newsom
Are these twist top canisters made of plastic?  If so, does plastic absorb
odors and coffee oils that might affect the next batch of stored beans?
Gerald

43) From: Demian Ebert
That sounds interesting. I'll be looking forward to the results.
On 2/7/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

44) From: Jeff Oien
I would let them go longer than a week. Some beans don't really
start to change until well after a week.
JeffO
Aaron wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: Brian Kamnetz
Aaron,
Sounds very interesting and I look forward to the results.
Brian
On 2/7/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

46) From: Jeff Bensen
Aaron -
This sounds like a good test. I'd be interested in the outcome as well.
I've been vac-sealing mason jars for about a year now. The one instance 
I've found this method to be useful is for freezing roasted coffee prior to 
traveling so I can have a decent cup when I return (I've had frost on some 
beans that were not vac sealed prior to freezing). But I also do this to my 
beans that I use day to day without questioning it's value.
Two comments on your test:
1) Would you consider adding a valve bag to the mix?
2) Extend the test to, say, three weeks (or more)? Most beans taste fine to 
me in the short term.
Thank you,
- Jeff Bensen
   Palm Bay, FL
At 12:32 PM 2/7/2006, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: Randolph Wilson
<Snip>
Just the opposite.  When I have put freshly roasted beans in jars the 
tops bulge up from CO2 outgassing.  I suppose you might wait for the 
major CO2 flow to subside, then vent and heat the jars to get the 
result you are talking about.
I've wondered about purging bags with nitrogen, then using a vacuum 
sealer on them.  That way, whatever gas the sealer leaves behind will 
be nitrogen, not air.
I store greens in cloth and burlap, but I have wondered if vacuum 
storage might be helpful.  My concern is that this may adversely 
impact the moisture content of the greens.
Regards,
Randy

48) From: Sandy Andina
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I store my roasted beans (except for the espressos, which see  
constant use) in one-way valve bags which then go into spring-bail- 
lid canisters (ceramic and stainless). The espressos go into Gladware  
(the regular) and Click-Clack containers, with the lids on loosely  
for the first day or so to facilitate outgassing. My greens stay in  
the bags they were shipped in--except for one bag of another vendor's  
decaf Guat. (SM's was out of the Huehue decaf at the time) which came  
in burlap; I transferred those greens immediately into a stainless  
container to get rid of that printers-ink scent the burlap had. Need  
to air them out more, though.
On Feb 7, 2006, at 10:55 AM, Demian Ebert wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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I store my roasted beans (except =
for the espressos, which see constant use) in one-way valve bags which =
then go into spring-bail-lid canisters (ceramic and stainless). The =
espressos go into Gladware (the regular) and Click-Clack containers, =
with the lids on loosely for the first day or so to facilitate =
outgassing. My greens stay in the bags they were shipped in--except for =
one bag of another vendor's decaf Guat. (SM's was out of the Huehue =
decaf at the time) which came in burlap; I transferred those greens =
immediately into a stainless container to get rid of that printers-ink =
scent the burlap had. Need to air them out more, though.
On =
Feb 7, 2006, at 10:55 AM, Demian Ebert wrote:
A lot = of folks vacuum seal their beans, but I'd hazard a guess there are quite = a few that don't. I store roasted beans in small jars w/o vacuum sealing = them. I don't have a vacuum sealer and beans generally don't last long = enough to get even close to stale. Most of my greens are either in the = cotton bags from SMs or in the ziplocs they are shipped in. =   Just had to offer a counter-point of view. =   Demian   On 2/7/06, Gerald = and Beth Newsom <gnewsomjr> = wrote: So, I just need to find a vacuum sealer with a jar = attachment?  I haven't even heard of that before, but I will certainly = be looking for one now.  Thanks for your help, Zara and = Bob!   Gerald =

49) From: Peter Zulkowski
Maybe I am wrong, but I think of that mason jar lid as a good seal. 
imho, when the jar is full, and even as I use it, the beans are fine. I 
keep my daily afternoon coffee beans in one and they stay about a week, 
or more.
My tastes are not that refined, and I enjoy them to the last.
For daily morning use we have a quart size wire clamp see through 
plastic jar with a silicon washer on top.
The roast gets dumped into that, and sealed, and sealed after every use. 
This lasts for about a week also, and the coffee is always great!
I did buy a vacuum attachment to seal the jars, but could perceive no 
difference. YMMV.
PeterZ
just my .02, here in LHC
Demian Ebert wrote:
<Snip>

50) From: Aaron
Yes they are plastic, fairly cheap and very durable.  No oils that I see 
however if I do find that I had a batch that turned out a bit oilier 
than normal, these containers go right in the sink and get washed just 
like any other dish would and come out fine.
aaron

51) From: Aaron
I was thinking about that jeff after I hit the send key of course.  What 
I will do is I will go in week intervals. until probably a month or so 
have passed maybe,  do one cup a week out of each batch.. that way we 
should start hitting the point where something not wanted should start 
happening to the beans and we can then see which method will let them 
hold out the longest before they are ready to be sold to charbucks.  Ill 
also do one in some of those ziplock vacuum breaker bags tom has.  so we 
have 4 methods to try.
Ill cook the beans tonight and try my first 'cupping' this coming sunday 
and do it every sunday until im out of beans or one goes truly nasty.  
Ill report in every sunday then and if there are any big changes, I can 
also throw up some pictures on my website, ie if one has excessive 
oiling or anything like that.
I am going to do 9.5 grams a cup of grounds into my swissgold filter.  
They all will be ground at the same time as one grinding batch,  and the 
water will be kept at the same temp when i dump it in to try to keep 
some of the variables out of the equation that might cause differences.
I will then let them sit in the cup a bit, smell the cup and let it get 
down to a few temp ranges and taste them at different temperature 
intervals too.  Hey, might as well have fun while playing with the coffee.
Aaron

52) From: Aaron
*******I've wondered about purging bags with nitrogen, then using a 
vacuum sealer on them.  That way, whatever gas the sealer leaves behind 
will be nitrogen, not air. ***** could also use CO2, either gas is just 
as easily obtainable.  even though, if the beans are letting out CO2 on 
their own, this will already displace the O2 in there as CO2 is 
heavier.  just hook them up the vaccuum thingie every few hours to suck 
off the oxygen that is displaced until eventually you are left with 
pretty much a rarified CO2 atmosphere in them.
****I store greens in cloth and burlap, but I have wondered if vacuum 
storage might be helpful.  My concern is that this may adversely impact 
the moisture content of the greens.****  Well this is a hard one to 
gauge.  Technically yes it might help remove some of the water from the 
bean BUT they are sealed tight in the container, so Id think the air 
would quickly saturate in there and not much would be lost, there's 
nowhere for it to really go .. they probably lose more moisture sitting 
in a dry house in open air.  From running distilling plants, I can tell 
you that you don't really have to worry about water flashing at room 
temperature until you start getting over 29 inches of vaccuum, and those 
containers get nowhere near that.   Also if you are worried about 
potential water loss, instead of a plastic container, vaccuum seal them 
in a vac bag, that way it is squeeeeeeezed up tight against the beans 
and there really isn't any air or space for the water to go really.
good questions though.
Aaron

53) From: Sandy Andina
I tend to be able to keep beans for about a month (if there's any  
left) post-roast, except for espressos, which last 10-14 days at the  
outside before the crema pales and dwindles.  I need to rest regular  
espressos at least 2-4 days, and decaf espressos 12 hrs.
On Feb 7, 2006, at 12:45 PM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

54) From: Brian Kamnetz
Aaron,
You mention:
"I am going to do 9.5 grams a cup of grounds...".
Do you mean the standard half-pint, 8-oz cup, or the (quasi-standard)
6-oz coffee cup, of water?
Thanks,
Brian
On 2/7/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

55) From: Brian Kamnetz
Aaron,
One more thing I just noticed:
"...let it get down to a few temp ranges...".
I really like that idea. Just this morning, all of a sudden, my coffee
drastically improved, most likely to hitting a "sweet spot" of
temperature.
Brian
On 2/7/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

56) From: Aaron
that would be a standard 8 ounce cup brian.  Yes I  know... coffee can 
be made stronger, but this way, it's strong enough to get all the 
flavors without being 'overly strong' and looking like Green Acres 
coffee where you can stand the spoon up in it, and because of that, 
harder to tell any subtle differences.
I am sure some are going to argue this logic but to me it seems to make 
sense.  If I am way off in left field here, someone please explain why 
so I can learn from it :)
Aaron

57) From: Woody DeCasere
just a thought, but the enemies of fresh coffee are, water, air (oxygen) an=
d
sunlight correct.
I store my beans in a ceramic opaque flip top jar, which while it isnt a
vacuum, it does keep out the sunlight, moisture (i know to a degree) and
more air from getting in, my beans never last more than a week to a week an=
d
a half and stored this way i dont have any freshness issues.
the only thing i sometimes do is move the beans to a smaller container when
they start to dwindle.
On 2/7/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
--
"I must crush you"

58) From: Jim Sheets
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have been using SM's one way valve bags for all my espresso roasts.  I've
had really good success in keeping the beans fresh from the results of the
crema on my shots.  I clean them and reuse them a few times (4 or 5) before
tossing.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Woody DeCasere
Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2006 4:06 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Coffee Storage
just a thought, but the enemies of fresh coffee are, water, air (oxygen) and
sunlight correct.
I store my beans in a ceramic opaque flip top jar, which while it isnt a
vacuum, it does keep out the sunlight, moisture (i know to a degree) and
more air from getting in, my beans never last more than a week to a week and
a half and stored this way i dont have any freshness issues. 
the only thing i sometimes do is move the beans to a smaller container when
they start to dwindle.
On 2/7/06, Aaron < beerbong  >
wrote: 
that would be a standard 8 ounce cup brian.  Yes I  know... coffee can 
be made stronger, but this way, it's strong enough to get all the
flavors without being 'overly strong' and looking like Green Acres
coffee where you can stand the spoon up in it, and because of that,
harder to tell any subtle differences. 
I am sure some are going to argue this logic but to me it seems to make
sense.  If I am way off in left field here, someone please explain why
so I can learn from it :)
Aaron-- 
"I must crush you" 

59) From: Randolph Wilson
<Snip>
Good answers as well.  It had crossed my mind that the CO2 was in the 
mix but I figured the nitrogen might be a more neutral shielding 
agent.  However, that was just SWAG on my part, along with a sick 
desire to add one more large steel cylinder to the growing collection 
in my garage (maybe it's a Freudian thing).
As for the greens, I was thinking plastic vacuum bags, and given the 
limited volume you are right - the bean would hit equilibrium with 
its environment pretty quickly.  For sure we aren't getting anywhere 
near a "real" vacuum - just reduced pressure and atmosphere - I was 
just considering the H20 migration that occurs anytime that there is 
a differential in the beans interior and its exterior.  Even I 
haven't gone off the deep end enough to use a diffusion pump to suck 
out "Seal-A-Meal" bags!
I guess the only other vague question in my mind is whether the 
greens need to have any sort of gas exchange to maintain freshness. 
That would seem a little bit out there, but I'd be interested if you 
or others know the answer.  My only experience with seed storage has 
been peanuts and corn, and in both cases they were just waiting to be 
shipped, or processed into feed, so storage times were a days to 
weeks, not months.
Thanks for the input.  I guess now I'm going to replace my 25 year 
old non-vacuum "Seal-A-Meal" with one that sucks (the air out of the 
bag).
regards,
Randy

60) From: Larry Dorman
I've been wondering about this...  how long does it take for the CO2
to escape once the jar is opened?  Presumably, good old fashioned air
repaces the concentrated CO2...  does this speed the oxidation
process?  If the CO2 escapes quickly after opening, is it better to
keep it sealed until you are ready to use or to bleed it off
occasionally?
LarryD
<Snip>
er
<Snip>

61) From: Randolph Wilson
<Snip>
Well, I think you get CO2 out of the beans on a diminishing basis for 
a long time, so in one sense, semi-forever.
<Snip>
Not if the jar is level, the air reasonably calm, and you just loosen 
the ring slightly - then it vents, but as CO2 is heavy, you could 
hold on to some of it if you wished. And, of course, at a rate 
dependent on roast age, it will be replenished to some degree
<Snip>
Well, I haven't had a jar explode yet.  I suppose if you were trying 
to let the roasted beans generate their own shielding gas you could 
wait a while, then vent (hopefully releasing any trapped air first, 
retaining mostly CO2), then reseal.
However, if you have a really good roast of Jamaican or Kona, you 
should leave all of the CO2 so the top bulges up.  Then you can tell 
everyone that those jars have an experimental culture of clostridium 
botulinum growing in them and no one is to touch them but you.
Regards,
Randy

62) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
I have done a mod on a few Mason jar lids. I have removed the one way valve
from a few of Toms Gold bags and drilled a hole just large enough for the
valve to fit in and leave the lip of the one-way valve over the edge of the
hole in the lid. I sealed them with Silicone around the edge of the lip. Now
I have jars that can be tighten on the lids seal and the one-way allows for
degassing but will not let the air back in. I used brand new lids for this
experiment. It seems to work just fine.
RK
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.2/252 - Release Date: 2/6/2006

63) From: Tomenid
Has anyone ever tried putting the beans in a white bottle and then using  
the stopper plus pump that is used to pump the air out of the bottle? It 
works  great to keep wine and I suspect it would work just as well for beans.
Tom
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64) From: Bob Hazen
Now that's an interesting idea.  I use a Vacu-vin for wine.  I'll have to 
give it a go on coffee beans.  Seems to me it will remove the oxygen around 
the beans and replace it with carbon dioxide from outgassing.  The stopper 
would then get loose.  I'm thinking it fits well enough, though, that the 
trickle of CO2 around the stopper might keep the O2 out.
Bob

65) From: Joseph Robertson
Sounds like a great idea Bob. Great roast training tool too. Any oil on the
beans would prevent the beans from pouring out of the bottle. I got to give
this a try.
Joe
On Sun, May 15, 2011 at 2:36 PM, Bob Hazen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Joseph Robertson
Sasquatch Coffee Roasters
Craft Coffee Roasting by Design
joe http://www.jolindas.com(360)521-3104     PO Box 451 Stevenson,Washington 98648 USA
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66) From: Bob Hazen
Wish I could take credit for the idea, but it wasn't mine.  I'm interested 
in giving it a try.  No oil on >my< beans, however!  :-)
Bob
<Snip>
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