HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New DeLonghi BAR32 Espresso Machine (9 msgs / 432 lines)
1) From: Earbud1
Today my two new espresso machines, purchased through an eBay seller,  
arrived. I had laid in a pound of Tom's roasted Amber espresso blend in  
anticipation but, although they had not been included in the auction description  list, a 
tin of 18 Illy espresso pods came with the machine I unpacked.
 
After reading the instructions and filling the tank, I used one of the illy  
pods and the small filter to test the machine for the first time. I preheated  
the machine and filter holder as instructed and then inserted the pod and 
waited  for the Ready light to come back on. When it did, I activated the pump 
and was  pleased to see crema froming in the cup with the first drizzle of 
espresso.  Unfortunately, I ran the pump too long and diluted the cup strength. 
Regardless,  I found the (over) shot tasting like a strong, not-so-great cup of  
coffee.
 
I next tried grinding some of the Amber blend using a zass manual grinder.  
It was producing a decent grind (rubbed between fingers no grit could be felt)  
but about 150 cranks produced less than a one shot measure that came w the  
machine. I then adjusted the mill to produce a grind in which I could just feel 
 grittiness using the above technique, a possible mistake. The measured 
amount  when "tamped" (using the built-in plastic tamper integral to this model) 
seemed  to press down easily but, when I'd gone through all the preliminary 
steps and  activated the pump, the espresso emerged only after about 25 seconds 
and took  the better part of a minute to produce a shot size portion.
 
It was flavorful but had no crema.
 
While I realize that the espresso elite turn their noses up at thermo-block  
machines like these, I can't help believing they should be a considerable  
improvement over the steam machines. Still, with these two basically failed  
experiments in my brief history w the machine, I am not favorably  impressed.
 

2) From: Brett Mason
Good points, all.
I think the espresso machine people aren't trying to be snobbish.  The
issue for them (me too) seems to be temperature control and pressure
control.  All the espresso pursuit seems to be about getting hot
enough temperatures and stronge enough pressure to pump the hot water
through the grind.
Tom wrote about a drip machine with 180 degree temp in his latest Tiny
Joy.  (See Sweetmarias.com to read).   The issue was flat tasing
coffee.  The problem was temps about 20 degrees low.
You know I love my zasses, and yet I do understand longer times
grinding.  I get the temp right by using an electric kettle and a
french press - at least at work.  For home I have stepped up to Miss
Silvia and Mr Rocky.  But I use my zasses and other methods too...
Maybe you should run a french press with 203 degree water to compare
with your new machine.  Budget should still be low enough that this
isn;t a $$$ issue.
Just 2cents...
Brett
    Zassman
On 3/15/06, Earbud1  wrote:
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he
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e w
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 to
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--
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

3) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-9-888998913
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Does your machine have an unpressurized portafilter? If not, you will  
not get decent, real crema no matter what. If you do have an  
unpressurized portafilter, you need to make sure of the following:
1. The beans are no more than 2 weeks (preferably, a week-10 days at  
most) post-roast.
2. You are grinding just before pulling each shot.
3.  You are grinding evenly, enough coffee (14 gm in a 2-shot  
basket), the right consistency for the machine, the weather, and the  
age of the beans. (An electric burr grinder rather than the Zass  
would make that easier and less frustrating to achieve).
4.  You are using a real, separate, heavy-enough (cast metal or  
weighted wood) tamper, and tamping hard enough.  If you are choking  
your machine, despite using the built in plastic tamper,   then the  
grind is too fine (it should have the slightest amount of grit).  If  
you are still choking your machine with a grind that is not too fine  
and an "easy" tamp, it sounds like you've got either a pressurized PF  
(which slows the flow of the water in the basket till air pressure  
can be built up ) or inadequate temp and pressure. I can practically  
guarantee you that your PF--pressurized or not--is too lightweight  
and flimsy to hold sufficient heat at a consistent temperature  
necessary to give you a decent-sized 23-28 second pour with good  
crema. The feast-or-famine flow you describe is typical of  
thermoblock machines--I ought to know, as I owned several of them  
(two Krups and a Capresso) before I moved up to a Silvia.
Yes, a thermoblock pumper is an improvement over a steam toy in that  
it technically produces "espresso," but you will never get a really  
good shot, or even a consistently decent shot. The next step up, a  
true boiler-and-pump machine like a Saeco/Barista or Gaggia, is a  
quantum leap in terms of quality, especially the Gaggia--adequate  
pressure and temp out of the boiler, a heavyweight pro portafilter  
with standardized baskets, and the possibility of getting  
consistently decent shots with good crema.  You needn't move up as  
high as a Silvia, but you will eventually want one.
Again, the reality check is that your De Longhi is better than a  
steam toy but not as good as a boiler pump machine.  If you doubt  
that, go back to a steam toy or a moka pot and see how much better  
the shots you get from the De Longhi are....but then try someone's  
Gaggia or even a Starbucks Barista (assuming they have a demo model  
with an unpressurized PF) to show you how much better one affordable  
notch up the scale can be.
On Mar 15, 2006, at 12:13 AM, Earbud1 wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-9-888998913
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Does your machine have an =
unpressurized portafilter? If not, you will not get decent, real crema =
no matter what. If you do have an unpressurized portafilter, you need to =
make sure of the following:1. The beans are no more than 2 weeks =
(preferably, a week-10 days at most) post-roast.2. You are =
grinding just before pulling each shot.3.  You are grinding =
evenly, enough coffee (14 gm in a 2-shot basket), the right consistency =
for the machine, the weather, and the age of the beans. (An electric =
burr grinder rather than the Zass would make that easier and less =
frustrating to achieve).4.  You are using a real, separate, =
heavy-enough (cast metal or weighted wood) tamper, and tamping hard =
enough.  If you are choking your machine, despite using the built in =
plastic tamper,   then the grind is too fine (it should have the =
slightest amount of grit).  If you are still choking your machine with =
a grind that is not too fine and an "easy" tamp, it sounds like you've =
got either a pressurized PF (which slows the flow of the water in the =
basket till air pressure can be built up ) or inadequate temp and =
pressure. I can practically guarantee you that your PF--pressurized or =
not--is too lightweight and flimsy to hold sufficient heat at a =
consistent temperature necessary to give you a decent-sized 23-28 second =
pour with good crema. The feast-or-famine flow you describe is typical =
of thermoblock machines--I ought to know, as I owned several of them =
(two Krups and a Capresso) before I moved up to a Silvia.
Yes, a thermoblock pumper = is an improvement over a steam toy in that it technically produces = "espresso," but you will never get a really good shot, or even a = consistently decent shot. The next step up, a true boiler-and-pump = machine like a Saeco/Barista or Gaggia, is a quantum leap in terms of = quality, especially the Gaggia--adequate pressure and temp out of the = boiler, a heavyweight pro portafilter with standardized baskets, and the = possibility of getting consistently decent shots with good crema.  You = needn't move up as high as a Silvia, but you will eventually want = one.
Again, = the reality check is that your De Longhi is better than a steam toy but = not as good as a boiler pump machine.  If you doubt that, go back to a = steam toy or a moka pot and see how much better the shots you get from = the De Longhi are....but then try someone's Gaggia or even a Starbucks = Barista (assuming they have a demo model with an unpressurized PF) to = show you how much better one affordable notch up the scale can = be. On Mar 15, 2006, at 12:13 AM, Earbud1 wrote:
= Today my two new espresso machines, purchased through an eBay = seller, arrived. I had laid in a pound of Tom's roasted Amber espresso = blend in anticipation but, although they had not been included in the = auction description list, a tin of 18 Illy espresso pods came with the = machine I unpacked.   After reading the = instructions and filling the tank, I used one of the illy pods and the = small filter to test the machine for the first time. I preheated the = machine and filter holder as instructed and then inserted the pod and = waited for the Ready light to come back on. When it did, I activated the = pump and was pleased to see crema froming in the cup with the first = drizzle of espresso. Unfortunately, I ran the pump too long and diluted = the cup strength. Regardless, I found the (over) shot tasting like a = strong, not-so-great cup of coffee.   I next = tried grinding some of the Amber blend using a zass manual grinder. It = was producing a decent grind (rubbed between fingers no grit could be = felt) but about 150 cranks produced less than a one shot measure that = came w the machine. I then adjusted the mill to produce a grind in which = I could just feel grittiness using the above technique, a possible = mistake. The measured amount when "tamped" (using the built-in plastic = tamper integral to this model) seemed to press down easily but, when I'd = gone through all the preliminary steps and activated the pump, the = espresso emerged only after about 25 seconds and took the better part of = a minute to produce a shot size portion.   It = was flavorful but had no crema.   While I = realize that the espresso elite turn their noses up at thermo-block = machines like these, I can't help believing they should be a = considerable improvement over the steam machines. Still, with these two = basically failed experiments in my brief history w the machine, I am not = favorably impressed.   =   = = --Apple-Mail-9-888998913--

4) From: Alchemist John
I owned a Delonghi for some time, and you can get a reasonable 
espresso out of it, but it takes work.  First off, you need to dial 
in your shot.  Forget about pre-conceived notions about how fine your 
grind should be - adjust by what you see.  Your goal is 1-2 oz 
starting in about 10 seconds and running 23-28 seconds.  So, based on 
what you have said, make you grind coarser and try again.  Also, you 
will need a real tamper that fits properly. The other thing I found 
that helped on these thermoblock units was having my reservoir water 
at around 120-130 F so it can actually get the shot temp up to 200+F easily.
Frankly, my Delonghi was one of the best things to happen to me - it 
really made me focus on my technique.  Once you can get a good shot 
on this, getting a good shot on better equipment is much easier.
At 22:13 3/14/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

5) From: Obrien, Haskell W.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
My krups thermobloc produced reasonable crema once I disabled the
pressurized portafilter and used tamper.
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
Earbud1
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 12:13 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +New DeLonghi BAR32 Espresso Machine
 
Today my two new espresso machines, purchased through an eBay seller,
arrived. I had laid in a pound of Tom's roasted Amber espresso blend in
anticipation but, although they had not been included in the auction
description list, a tin of 18 Illy espresso pods came with the machine I
unpacked.
 
After reading the instructions and filling the tank, I used one of the
illy pods and the small filter to test the machine for the first time. I
preheated the machine and filter holder as instructed and then inserted
the pod and waited for the Ready light to come back on. When it did, I
activated the pump and was pleased to see crema froming in the cup with
the first drizzle of espresso. Unfortunately, I ran the pump too long
and diluted the cup strength. Regardless, I found the (over) shot
tasting like a strong, not-so-great cup of coffee.
 
I next tried grinding some of the Amber blend using a zass manual
grinder. It was producing a decent grind (rubbed between fingers no grit
could be felt) but about 150 cranks produced less than a one shot
measure that came w the machine. I then adjusted the mill to produce a
grind in which I could just feel grittiness using the above technique, a
possible mistake. The measured amount when "tamped" (using the built-in
plastic tamper integral to this model) seemed to press down easily but,
when I'd gone through all the preliminary steps and activated the pump,
the espresso emerged only after about 25 seconds and took the better
part of a minute to produce a shot size portion.
 
It was flavorful but had no crema.
 
While I realize that the espresso elite turn their noses up at
thermo-block machines like these, I can't help believing they should be
a considerable improvement over the steam machines. Still, with these
two basically failed experiments in my brief history w the machine, I am
not favorably impressed.
 
 

6) From: sean
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
What number is your Krups?
 
I have a 962 and wondered if there is a way to make it better?
 
Sean  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Obrien, Haskell
W.
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 3:23 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +New DeLonghi BAR32 Espresso Machine
 
My krups thermobloc produced reasonable crema once I disabled the
pressurized portafilter and used tamper.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Earbud1
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 12:13 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +New DeLonghi BAR32 Espresso Machine
 
Today my two new espresso machines, purchased through an eBay seller,
arrived. I had laid in a pound of Tom's roasted Amber espresso blend in
anticipation but, although they had not been included in the auction
description list, a tin of 18 Illy espresso pods came with the machine I
unpacked.
 
After reading the instructions and filling the tank, I used one of the illy
pods and the small filter to test the machine for the first time. I
preheated the machine and filter holder as instructed and then inserted the
pod and waited for the Ready light to come back on. When it did, I activated
the pump and was pleased to see crema froming in the cup with the first
drizzle of espresso. Unfortunately, I ran the pump too long and diluted the
cup strength. Regardless, I found the (over) shot tasting like a strong,
not-so-great cup of coffee.
 
I next tried grinding some of the Amber blend using a zass manual grinder.
It was producing a decent grind (rubbed between fingers no grit could be
felt) but about 150 cranks produced less than a one shot measure that came w
the machine. I then adjusted the mill to produce a grind in which I could
just feel grittiness using the above technique, a possible mistake. The
measured amount when "tamped" (using the built-in plastic tamper integral to
this model) seemed to press down easily but, when I'd gone through all the
preliminary steps and activated the pump, the espresso emerged only after
about 25 seconds and took the better part of a minute to produce a shot size
portion.
 
It was flavorful but had no crema.
 
While I realize that the espresso elite turn their noses up at thermo-block
machines like these, I can't help believing they should be a considerable
improvement over the steam machines. Still, with these two basically failed
experiments in my brief history w the machine, I am not favorably impressed.
 

7) From: Aaron
It was written:
What number is your Krups?
I have a 962 and wondered if there is a way to make it better?
 ======
Well, if you water it, and give it plenty of sunlight and fertilizer, it 
might eventually grow into a 970 possibly even a 980.. that should be 
better no?
Aaron

8) From: Turbosimba
Keep working with your DeLonghi.. There is a learning curve and it almost  
seems like a magical one. The more you use your machine, the better the espresso 
 and the more crema it will produce.  Pods are not known to produce as much  
crema as  properly ground, brewed, measured and tamped fresh ground  coffee.  
The machines really have to warm up to be good. Let it warm up  quite a bit 
longer than it takes for the ready light to light up. Keep  experimenting..  
you'll be amazed at how much better you get at it.
 
Jeff

9) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Alchemist John wrote:
<Snip>
This is the 'nut' of the conversation. I have maintained in the past 
that Barista contests should use machines like this to force the 
contestants to demonstrate their knowledge of coffee. All that extra 
money that you spend makes it easier to get better results.
FYI, Krups Gusto, Omre Automatica, Faema Compact (Only the Rocky and a 
Zass all that time)


HomeRoast Digest