HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Failed attempts at roast profiles (26 msgs / 883 lines)
1) From: Scot Murphy
I'm facing some problems here with doing anything outside the  
ordinary in my SC/TO roaster! I've been reading some of the  
descriptions of roast profiles from, say, the iRoast 2, and I have  
been thinking that my temp ramp-ups have been too fast, so I tried  
some delays. I'll get into details in a second, but essentially, I am  
getting weirdly baked-tasting beans. My one batch of Kenyan peaberry  
that tasted so good the day after roasting had an odd, molasses-y  
flavor two days after; so did the decaf Sulawesi Toraja I just drank  
tonight. (Last night it was fine.)
I don't think I can go into all the details of all of the roasts, but  
in essence, here's what's been happening. For some reason, some of my  
roasts have gone up from around 250F to 400F in a matter of two or  
three minutes. What I have been doing is preheating the thing to 300,  
then adding in the beans (varying amounts), which usually brings the  
temp down again as low as 240. It never stays there that long,  
reaching 300 in about 30 seconds or so. When it climbs at a rate of  
five degrees every seven or eight seconds, in general, I don't have a  
problem, but sometimes it climbs at a rate of about five degrees  
every four seconds. That has just been seeming too fast, and I didn't  
want it to hit first crack before the bean was heated through, so I  
tried flattening out the roast at 350 for a minute or two. That  
seemed to be giving me baked beans, so I tried profiles that  
generally had a climb up to 375 or 400 within about three to three  
and a half minutes, then holding for a minute, sometimes two. Then I  
have been letting the heat rise to around 450 and holding for a  
minute or two, so that the roast doesn't run away from me, and  
allowing it to go up around 475.
Here's the thing: with the exception of decaf, when I roasted in a  
Poppery I got nice bright beans. With the SC/TO, there's always a  
hint of baked-ness about them. When I grind the beans, no matter the  
profile, the grounds always have at least a hint of dry baker's  
chocolate smell to them. That's not how ground coffee should smell!  
And when I tried profiling the roasts, rather than just plugging it  
in and letting it go, I get more baked flavor and more molasses-y  
flavor. Like I said, good the day after, undrinkable the next. The  
best "profile" I have with it is to dump the beans in around 300F and  
just let them roast for the next ten minutes or so depending.
I'm really trying to develop some skills here so I can adapt  
different profiles to different beans, but so far I am getting crap.  
I don't want to treat every bean like every other bean when I know  
some will take a different profile to get maximum character. But what  
do I do when my attempts to profile all ruin the bean?!
Scot "and what do I do with all those logs I've written?" Murphy
-----------
"Complete and accurate surveillance as a means of control is probably  
a practical impossibility. What is much more likely is a loss of  
privacy and constant inconvenience as the wrong people gain access to  
information, as one wastes time convincing the inquisitors that one  
is in fact innocent, or as one struggles to untangle the errors of  
the errant machine."
	--VICTOR FERKISS

2) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-98--471688886
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I'm having a slightly different experience--I find that Presets 1  
(with a full 160 gm load, despite what Hearthware purportedly says)  
and 2 have never failed me on the i-Roast2, whereas trying to set a  
profile is a crapshoot--I used one of the ones suggested for Centrals  
with a PR Yauco Selecto and got baked beans--had to let it cool and  
rerun it at 405 for 6 more min. till it darkened a bit and showed its  
brightness in the "bean munch." OTOH, I don't dare use the presets  
anymore on my old i-Roast--I must set a gentle ramp-up (3 min. at  
345, 4 at 385 and 4 at 410, stopping with 2-3 min,. left) or else it  
overheats the beans in the center to French, smokes like crazy and  
then shuts off with some stragglers that have barely (if at all) made  
it to first crack.  (No harm, no foul--I immediately dumped just such  
a prematurely aborted batch of aged Sumatra into a colander and  
whisked it till it cooled--as the stragglers popped).  I find that  
the original i-Roast is good for one batch a day, period--it did just  
fine with a batch of Sumatra Gayo Mt, to FC an hour earlier.  So I  
will bracket i-2 roasts around it from now on.
On Mar 24, 2006, at 2:12 AM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-98--471688886
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I'm having a slightly different =
experience--I find that Presets 1 (with a full 160 gm load, despite what =
Hearthware purportedly says) and 2 have never failed me on the i-Roast2, =
whereas trying to set a profile is a crapshoot--I used one of the ones =
suggested for Centrals with a PR Yauco Selecto and got baked beans--had =
to let it cool and rerun it at 405 for 6 more min. till it darkened a =
bit and showed its brightness in the "bean munch." OTOH, I don't dare =
use the presets anymore on my old i-Roast--I must set a gentle ramp-up =
(3 min. at 345, 4 at 385 and 4 at 410, stopping with 2-3 min,. left) or =
else it overheats the beans in the center to French, smokes like crazy =
and then shuts off with some stragglers that have barely (if at all) =
made it to first crack. (No harm, no foul--I immediately dumped just =
such a prematurely aborted batch of aged Sumatra into a colander and =
whisked it till it cooled--as the stragglers popped). I find that the =
original i-Roast is good for one batch a day, period--it did just fine =
with a batch of Sumatra Gayo Mt, to FC an hour earlier. So I will =
bracket i-2 roasts around it from now on.
On Mar 24, =
2006, at 2:12 AM, Scot Murphy wrote:
I'm facing some problems here with doing anything = outside the ordinary in my SC/TO roaster! I've been reading some of the = descriptions of roast profiles from, say, the iRoast 2, and I have been = thinking that my temp ramp-ups have been too fast, so I tried some = delays. I'll get into details in a second, but essentially, I am getting = weirdly baked-tasting beans. = --Apple-Mail-98--471688886--

3) From: Aaron Peterson
On 3/24/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
ver
<Snip>
--I
<Snip>
ot
<Snip>
it
<Snip>
't
<Snip>
up
<Snip>
lse
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
rst
<Snip>
ood
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
ow
<Snip>
I've been experimenting with the iRoast2 as well trying to extend the
roast longer and make the temperature ramp up slower.  Anyway, the
short version of the story is that I'm not having much luck.  Last
time I tried the following profile:
3 min - 355 F
2:30 min - 400 F
1 min - 355 F
6 min - 400 F
Now this profile would be absolutely silly if these temperatures were
accurate.  However, by the end of the 2:30 minutes at 400 F, the TC
shows I'm in the 415-425 range depending on the bean, and first crack
has started.  The 1 minute at 355 doesn't seem to power down the
heating element at all, it just kicks the fan speed up resulting in no
real drop in temperature at all (well in some cases as much as 3-5
degrees) but instead just pretty much holds the current temperature
for that minute.  Then when it kicks back in the 400 F setting, the
temperature starts rising again up to wherever I manually hit cool to
finish the roast.
I can't really say I like the roasts produced by the above profile any
better though, so I guess I don't recommend hassling with it any more.
 I could never let the preset functions finish their programs.  Even
preset 1 would burn every time on my iRoast2.  I think my favorite
setting so far is just 400 F for the whole roast.  The 400 F setting
on my iRoast2 takes the temperature all the way up through 460 F (and
probably beyond) for almost every bean I've tried.  I did okay with
preset 2 as well, as long as I stopped the roast manually.
Aaron Peterson
Versailles, KY

4) From: Bill Morgan
My guess is problems with the temperature measurements.  How and where
are you measuring?  No way is the bean mass going from ambient to 300
in 30 sec.  If I had to guess, I imagine that you're measuring the air
temperature above the beans.  Remember that the bean temperature is
always going to be following behind the air temp.
That said, I've tabled SC\TO roasting for similar reasons of never
feeling in control of the process.  I suppose I'm too dependent on the
thermometer in my poppers and need to relax and "zen" things a little
more.  Now that I have a thermcouple I'm going to start experimenting
with how to place it in the SC\TO, but I'm going to experiment on UGH.
HTH,
Bill
On 3/24/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Aaron Peterson
On 3/24/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm pretty sure he said he preheated the thing to 300, put the beans
in which dropped the temp to ~240.  From there it took 30 seconds to
get back to 300.
Aaron Peterson
Versailles, KY

6) From: Bill Morgan
I don't doubt that the air temperature inside the device rebounded
that fast.  I do doubt that the beans heated that fast.  In my
experience a thermometer in the air above the beans in an SC/TO
fluctuated too much and read crazy high temperatures a lot of the
time, like 450+ degrees before first crack.
Bill
On 3/24/06, Aaron Peterson  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Ed Needham
I think you nailed it right here Bill.
A dozen years ago, when I was learning to fly a single engine plane, the 
instructor noticed that I was doing the 'white knuckle' thing and reacting 
quickly to every bump and gust of wind that I encountered while making final 
approach and landing.  Needless to say, the landings were nerve wracking and 
all over the place.  His suggestion was to put two fingers on the yoke, sit 
back and relax, not trying to counter respond every time the plane bumped a 
bit.  His advice improved both my nerves and my approaches.
Sometimes, when roasting, I think we get caught up in the tiny details and 
fiddle so much we ruin the roast.  Developing a baseline roast, and doing 
comparison cuppings (blind triangle cuppings* work really well for this), 
varying only one thing at a time will give you the best results in the long 
run.  Problem is that just when you get a roast dialed in, you run out of 
that bean!
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************
*triangle cupping involves two samples of one roast, and one sample of the 
other roast and you try to pick the different one from the three.  It must 
be done in a blind fashion, where you don't know which is which except by 
taste.

8) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Scot,
Beans roasted in a popper will have a somewhat different character
compared to the same beans roasted in the SC/TO.  Very, very generally
the poppers are more like fluid bed roasters and the SC/TO is more
like a drum roaster.  Fluid bed roasters depend more on a flow of hot
air to circulate the beans.  Drum roasters depend more on mechanical
agitation to circulate the beans.  Each style gives a different
result.
For the SC/TO, here are a couple of thoughts:
1.  Is the heating element in the Stir Crazy disabled?  Or do you have
it on?  The heating element can really change a profile.  It doesn't
matter if you do or do not use it - you just have to adjust profiles
accordingly.
2.  My general SC/TO profile, which gives uniformly good results, is this:
300 for about 3 minutes
Click up to 370 or 390 (forget what the dial says) until 1st crack. 
Usually happens around 8 minutes in.
Click up a couple of notches past 370/390 on the dial and leave it
until you hit the sweet spot in the roast or until the very first
snaps of 2nd crack.  Ranges from 12-16 minutes.
I do have the SC heater disabled.  Once I get to know a bean, I can
fine tune the profile to get the best out of it.
Hope this is helpful.
--
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO & i'Roast2

9) From: Demian Ebert
 Scott et al.
I've got about 11 roasts on my scto to date. So for no major complaints,
except the Oaxaca Finco (?) el Olivo tasted really flat to me for some
reason. I may do an i-roast batch for comparison, but that's another post.
Here is my "process" for comparison:
I preheat my scto to about 350-370 and dump in a half pound of beans. I
always use the same amount of bean, so that's one variable you can control.
I'm measuring air temps above the bean mass, so it's not precise in any
sense of the word, but it is relatively repeatable. I run the TO at 390 for
a couple of minutes, then back it off and try to hold somewhere around 400
for a few minutes to dry the beans and get everyone up to the same
temperature. Then the TO goes back up to 390. I hit first crack right aroun=
d
470 on the probe in somewhere around 8 minutes. I tweak the TO down to shut
off the heat, then back up as the temps drop. The idea being to just
maintain the environment that's allowing 1st to occur. Once first is done
(about 90 seconds total), I'll ramp the temps back up but keep tweaking the
TO up and down to stretch the time between 1st and 2nd. Second starts with =
a
probe temp around 510
For profiling, I'd think that you'd want to do two main things: change the
time to first and increase (generally) the time between 1st and 2nd. The
first of these is probably the easiest. Changing time between 1st and 2nd i=
s
harder, but I think it's possible to do with the SCTO, it just takes
practice. I'm certainly more comfortable about how the temps react to TO
changes as I go along.
Hope that helps.
Demian

10) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-107--435534105
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I don't mind stopping roasts manually--I think maybe one in the past  
year I've let the program go all the way, and that was doing Puro  
Scuro outdoors on an autumn day.   I do find that the 2 runs truer to  
temp than the original, but I still usually stop with at least a  
minute and a half to go. Got distracted last night and ended up--with  
a minute and a half to go on Preset 2--with a Vienna-to-French roast  
on a PR Yauco Selecto--giving it to a friend who prefers dark roasts  
(she's now on the U.P. of Mich., where there are none of the Peet's  
or Starbucks she was used to "down in the Mitten").  I've learned not  
to get hung up on the readout, but to go by sight, smell and sound.
On Mar 24, 2006, at 7:13 AM, Aaron Peterson wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-107--435534105
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I don't mind stopping roasts =
manually--I think maybe one in the past year I've let the program go all =
the way, and that was doing Puro Scuro outdoors on an autumn day. I =
do find that the 2 runs truer to temp than the original, but I still =
usually stop with at least a minute and a half to go. Got distracted =
last night and ended up--with a minute and a half to go on Preset =
2--with a Vienna-to-French roast on a PR Yauco Selecto--giving it to a =
friend who prefers dark roasts (she's now on the U.P. of Mich., where =
there are none of the Peet's or Starbucks she was used to "down in the =
Mitten"). I've learned not to get hung up on the readout, but to go =
by sight, smell and sound.
On Mar 24, 2006, at 7:13 AM, =
Aaron Peterson wrote:
I could never let the preset functions finish their = programs. = Evenpreset 1 would burn every = time on my iRoast2. = = --Apple-Mail-107--435534105--

11) From: Scot Murphy
On |Mar 24, at 8:03 AM|Mar 24, Bill Morgan wrote:
<Snip>
That's an excellent point. Yes, I am using the digital thermometer  
(with the wire lead, not the stick kind) sold by Tom, and I generally  
place that above the beans. I would place it *in* the beans if I knew  
a way to do that without getting it tangled in the stirring rod. I  
guess the question is, when the air temp reads 400, what is the  
actual bean temp? Is there any way to tell? And even if I could  
somehow bury the lead in the beans, would I still be close to  
measuring the inner temp of the bean itself?
I had tried, when I first started SC/TO roasting, adding the beans  
when my (seriously flawed) dial thermometer read 400F. I got  
seriously flawed baked beans. Given that the air temperature is  
always going to be ahead of the bean temperature, do you have any  
suggestions? Should I add the beans at a temp lower than 300 to allow  
them to warm up more gradually? Is there any point at trying for a  
profile, pausing at higher temps?
I'd love to try drum roasting, but as I live in an apartment, I don't  
have a gas grill. Then again, I do still have that rotisserie oven to  
modify...
Scot "more watts, more amps, more POWER" Murphy
---
"The clergy, by getting themselves established by law and ingrafted  
into the machine of government, have been a very formidable engine  
against the civil and religious rights of man."
	 --Thomas Jefferson to Jeremiah Moor, 1800.

12) From: Demian Ebert
The probe in my SCTO goes in through one of the vent holes in the spacer
ring and just hovers above the bean mass. I can see the temps jump a few
degrees as the bean mass is moved towards the probe by the stirring arms. I
try not to worry about the fact that the probe (I use the same kind you're
using) is reading 470 when I get 1st crack. The air temp is higher, but if
1st always shows up around 470 then that's when the beans must be ready to
go. It sort of means that the beans are lagging 70 +/- degrees behind the
air temps. I use it as more of an index than anything else.
Maybe we shouldn't preheat. Just dump the beans in cold and bring it all up
to temperature together. But drum roasters preheat, so it can't be all bad.
Demian

13) From: Scot Murphy
On |Mar 24, at 10:27 AM|Mar 24, Brent - SC/TO Roasting wrote:
<Snip>
Very helpful. As a matter of fact, my SC heater is still connected. I  
haven't disconnected it because I am pretty much a dunderhead when it  
comes to such things. I recently won another SC on eBay for the  
purpose of playing around with the heater, so we'll see. I have been  
wondering if the connected heater might be contributing to the baked  
flavor. Now, as far as measuring the temp, I don't pay any attention  
to the dial. I have the thermocouple gotten from Tom, but I haven't  
figured out a decent way to get it to measure the bean mass rather  
than the air above it.
(I thought, how about just snaking it in along the bottom? Then it  
might get caught in the stirring rod. So what about taping it to the  
bottom? Then my coffee might taste like toasted tape. There's the  
possibility of drilling a hole in the bottom and running it in that  
way, but I want to be able to use it for other things, like measuring  
my shot temps, so it can't be permanent. Plus anything in contact  
with the bottom has to mean the heater needs to be disconnected,  
otherwise all it will measure is the bottom temp.
I guess I will wait until I make these changes to play with roast  
profiles...!
Scot "hot bottom" Murphy
---
"Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends  
[i.e., securing inherent and inalienable rights, with powers derived  
from the consent of the governed], it is the right of the people to  
alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its  
foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such  
form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and  
happiness."
		 --Thomas Jefferson: Declaration of Independence, 1776. ME 1:29,  
Papers 1:315

14) From: David Pichner
Scot;
In my Stir Crazy/Galloping Gourmet (SC/GG) setup I switched the SC
heating element so I can boost the heat here and there when I think
the roasts is stalling a bit (it is mostly off). I also feel (no proof
what so ever) radiating heat from the bottom of SC keeps the internal
bean temp ramping more consistently.
As I was preparing to switch roasters (SC/GG to RK Drum) I let the
Plexiglas on the GG smoke over and started 'blind' roasting. 
Discussions on the list in times past and currently about walking by
faith and not by sight ... (oops wrong list) ... roasting by smell and
not by sight results in predictable and consistent roasts (by
experience, I'm beginning to believe it maybe more predictable).
I've roasted with the SC/GG setup over an 18 month period and one
thing I found is roasting in the summer is different than roasting in
the winter, even indoors.  I found the probes temp readings were
different enough with the same control settings, that it was difficult
achieving the same roast profile in the summer basing it on temp
readings from a probe riding the bean mass alone ... I started
roasting with the SC/GG in the winter ... then last summer I was white
knuckling the roasts. I now believe (will test it out this summer)
roasting by time (from start to first crack) and smell (from first
crack to second) will provide the consistency of roast I'm looking to
achieve. I'll adjust the GG controls in subsequent roasts to reach a
target time between first and second cracks (4-6 minutes), but relying
on the smells to determine the termination of the roast.
I nodded my head in agreement as I read Ed Needham's post regarding
macro v. micro management of the roasts (two fingers v. white
knuckles), very good advice.
I also nodded in agreement to Brent's observations on the similar drum
v. fluid bed and SC/TO v. popper comparisons regarding different
characterizes of the roast and resulting flavor in the cup.
When I was studying about various roasts and profiles I read someone's
diary (sorry I forget who) regarding their experiences at the two-day
seminar at Diedrich's in Idaho. The thing that stuck with me was that
one of the goals of roasting, according to this diary report on
Stephan Diedrich's teaching, is to keep the bean mass increasing in
temp over the entire roast. I seem to remember that the target ramp
between first and second crack was approx.5 degrees Celsius per
minute. (This falls in the time range of 4 to 6 minutes between first
and second than many here on the list recommend).
One thing I didn't see in your original post was the amount of coffee
you are roasting.  I believe the SC/GG setup requires more beans than
a popper to roast successfully.  My average green weight is 14oz. With
modified stirring rod the capacity of the SC/GG, in my experience, can
be as high as 24-26oz.  I think my smallest roast has been 8oz  I feel
(again, no proof what so ever) anything under 8oz. would not produce
an optimal roast.
Rejoicing in the Lord, always
David
On 3/24/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Demian Ebert
Probe placement- Will O'Brien has a page where he shows how he just clamped
the probe into the spot that had been used by the SC thermostat. Pictures
and details at http://biobug.org/coffee/turbo-crazy/thermocouple/Of course this is a permanent fixture. I recently ordered replcement probes
becuase mine was worn from being fed through the iroast cap. When I ordred
them I got three cause they were so cheap and I had to pay shipping anyway.
I now just leave one hooked up to the SC and another one in the i-roast. I
just move the actual meter back and forth.
FWIW, I taped my probe to the side of the popper for a long time. Never
tasted like tape to me but I had to replace the tape every so often cause i=
t
degraded in the heat and stopped working.
Demian
On 3/24/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Bill Morgan
This is exactly what I want to try.  But...  Where are replacement
probes so cheap?  I've been seeing prices like $20-30 each and I know
they must be available for less.
Thanks,
Bill
On 3/25/06, Demian Ebert  wrote:
<Snip>
ed
<Snip>
es
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
y.
<Snip>
I
<Snip>

17) From: Peter Schmidt
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
For quite some time my tc probe was simply fed through a 3/16" ID tube =
in the side of the SC.  I used a " "roll pin" a.k.a. "tension pin".  =
The probe takes some abuse from the beans passing by.
Since then I've replaced my thermometers with another brand that is sold =
as a BBQ meat thermometer.  The pointy metal probe is about 6" long, =
with a bend at the other end.  It simply dangles over the edge of my =
spacer and rides in the bean mass.  The angle of the dangle should be =
kept low as possible to keep most of the probe tip in the beans, so I =
cut a slot in my spacer.
The mod that I'm enjoying most is my 1.5" aluminum spacer.  It is =
secured to the SC w/ three tiny wood screws, and has a half inch overlap =
that is not screwed.  I use a thin piece of wood to prop it open, and =
the tension of the aluminum will keep it closed.  It works great as a =
chaff ejector (be sure to know which direction your CO circulates the =
hot air), but really helps in regulating the heat.  Closed, it will keep =
heat in so I can easily hold the end-of-1st temps within a few degrees.  =
If the temps start rising as the beans give off heat, I can prop it open =
and gradually let some heat out.  Works well, and gives a fair amount of =
control.
Roasting in the shade in M'waukee,
peter

18) From: Demian Ebert
Bill-
When I asked the list for this same information someone came up with this
site. This is the best price I found at $2.95 each + s/h.http://www.techbuys.net/tl-108.htmlDemian
On 3/25/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Bill Morgan
Thank you SO much.  After more digging, the best price I could find
was just over $11 each.  I just ordered four of them for that much
money!
Oh, for future searchers:  This is for K Type thermocouple probes.
Bill
On 3/26/06, Demian Ebert  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Bob Adams
Just to confirm--this fits TC that SM's sells?
Thanks, Bob

21) From: Bill Morgan
Yes, or at least I fully expect it to fit the one I bought from SM. 
"K type thermocouple probe" is a standard item that is supposed to be
fully interchangeable.
I'll know for 100% certain in a few days.
Bill
On 3/26/06, Bob Adams  wrote:
<Snip>
is
<Snip>

22) From: Demian Ebert
Yes it does.
Demian
On 3/26/06, Bob Adams  wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Bill Morgan
These are IDENTICAL to the one that came with the thermometer from
Sweet Maria's.  If you mixed them together in a pile you couldn't tell
the difference.  Must be the same manufacturer behind the scenes.
Delighted,
Bill
On 3/26/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
this
<Snip>

24) From: Larry English
Yup, identical, same mfg apparently, no external differences whatsoever.
I'm still looking for one with thinner leads, for easier
threading/insertion, for less than $30, but no luck so far. If anyone finds
one, please advise ...
Larry
On 3/30/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>
h
<Snip>

25) From: M. McCandless
One type of TC (K) is made from chromel alumel alloys.
I used to make these, just weld the wires & connect to the
polarized yellow connector.
I put chromel alumel into Google & got >130,000 hits.
Take your pick - assembled or not - some small gauge
Teflon insulated wire (recommended), etc.
McSparky
At 07:56 PM 3/30/2006 -0800, you wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Fluke 80PK-1 is $15 from Graingers (www.grainger.com)  It has thin =
teflon insulaton over the two leads.  http://us.fluke.com/usen/products/AccessoryDetail.htm?cs_id=21129%28Flu=keProducts%29&catalog_name=FlukeUnitedStates
Michael Wade


HomeRoast Digest