HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The Future of Home Roasters (52 msgs / 1340 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
     I've been meaning to tell everyone about this little FYI- that is, I
emailed Hottop USA a few days ago, and asked them about what's in store as
far as future home roasters. Apparently there will be an anouncement of som=
e
"special" developments in mid-April, at the SCAA conference. I assume (hope=
)
that the internet will be flooded with discussions and opinions around that
time. It is unclear until the SCAA conference whether these new development=
s
are simply future plans or include new units already in production. I
persononally will be interested to see how the new hottop will perform (if,
and when it is released), and will be especiallly interested in comparing i=
t
to the much anticipated Gene Cafe, which I hear is extremely quiet, and
compact, and combines air and drum roasting technology all at once (and may
be marketed at a slightly cheaper price). I wander what features will Hotto=
p
improve or change.... I'll be waiting until mid-April for the answer to thi=
s
one.  By the way, anyone know when the Gene Cafe will hit U.S. markets?
Maybe they too will have a big anouncement at the SCAA conference?
     Later,
     Jeremy

2) From:
Jeremy:
still all sounds like vaporware to me...
wait until you see what the new quik and igloo companies have been doing in development of roastrs for the home that I hear will blow Hot Top on it's bottom.
rex
<Snip>

3) From: b cook
I hear West Bend is about to unleash 3000 vintage Poppery I's on the open
market.  :P
brad
On 3/27/06, beanjolais  wrote:
<Snip>
t's
<Snip>

4) From: Dan Kellgren
As a side note, the SCAA has a really cool site! http://www.scaa.org/ Nea=
t
interactive map of coffee regions...
On 3/27/06, b cook  wrote:
<Snip>
g
<Snip>
 it's
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
m
<Snip>

5) From: Rich Adams

6) From: admin
I have 4 prototypes at different stages, and 4 production machines to pick up at the warehouse. This is the first "experimental" shipment. Like all roasters, it has promise and problems. If I were you, I would not want to be a guinea pig on this first batch. I have not spoken about the machine at all because, while the design is sound, I really don't know at all about the reliability. And there is no use testing reliability when it is not an actual production machine. Anyway, after I get them, I am going to see how well they calibrate to eachother, then do some durability tests ... and just pend a few weeks roasting a lot on them to see what comes up. I'll post some pictures and comments during that time. In general the Gene Caffe is a 1/3 to 1/2 lb roaster with a glass drum (highly visible roast process) with times ranging from 15 to 22 minutes. It cools in the drum, and does not mive the volume of air I would like - I told them about this but they did nothing to change it. 
 The controls are simple and intuitive, and allow for on-the-fly time and roast temperature adjustment. It is not a machine with pre-program roast curve settings. I like this, because you almost need a laptop to really do roast curves - better not to have it at all, and you can do your own roast adjestments as you watch the roast, withgout any limitations. There are some other design/reliability issues that I will start to feel better about if I do 50+ roasts but right now they make mer nervous. Price will be just under 500. It will be a compelling hottop alternative BUT Hottop is still the only roaster to cool oustide the drum, and that is a bigger feature than many give it credit for...
Tom

7) From: Paul Goelz
<Snip>
How cleanable is the drum?  I would think it would require very 
frequent cleaning to retain the visibility.  ??
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

8) From: Matthew Price
Could you add testing it at different voltages with a variac to your
regime?  This seems to be the achilies heal of many roasters,
especially when comparing curves with other roasters.  My results at
107V in the shed will be different, possibly radicly so, from results
at 118V in the kitchen.  It would be nice if designers could remember
to include at least 10V of headroom, but I know that with standard
north american residential service the energy budget starts out tight.
Matthew
On 3/28/06, admin  wrote:
<Snip>
k up at the warehouse. This is the first "experimental" shipment. Like all =
roasters, it has promise and problems. If I were you, I would not want to b=
e a guinea pig on this first batch. I have not spoken about the machine at =
all because, while the design is sound, I really don't know at all about th=
e reliability. And there is no use testing reliability when it is not an ac=
tual production machine. Anyway, after I get them, I am going to see how we=
ll they calibrate to eachother, then do some durability tests ... and just =
pend a few weeks roasting a lot on them to see what comes up. I'll post som=
e pictures and comments during that time. In general the Gene Caffe is a 1/=
3 to 1/2 lb roaster with a glass drum (highly visible roast process) with t=
imes ranging from 15 to 22 minutes. It cools in the drum, and does not mive=
 the volume of air I would like - I told them about this but they did nothi=
ng to change it.
<Snip>
 roast temperature adjustment. It is not a machine with pre-program roast c=
urve settings. I like this, because you almost need a laptop to really do r=
oast curves - better not to have it at all, and you can do your own roast a=
djestments as you watch the roast, withgout any limitations. There are some=
 other design/reliability issues that I will start to feel better about if =
I do 50+ roasts but right now they make mer nervous. Price will be just und=
er 500. It will be a compelling hottop alternative BUT Hottop is still the =
only roaster to cool oustide the drum, and that is a bigger feature than ma=
ny give it credit for...
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
--
Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of
chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course
others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

9) From: Thomas Pfau
Matthew Price wrote:
<Snip>
Power fluctuations could get quite large.  The power company is supposed 
to deliver something between 110 and 125 volts.  They frequently fall 
below that range especially during the summer months when everyone is 
running air conditioners.  I'm sure there are also conditions that would 
get them to exceed the upper part of the range.
I have been working on a recording project with some friends.  The 
recorder is plugged into a power conditioner with a voltage readout.  
That in turn is plugged into a battery backup unit.  Last summer, we 
frequently had to stop recording for a while because line voltage 
dropped below 100 volts which triggered the battery backup unit to 
switch to battery power.
I wouldn't expect equipment manufacturers to expect their products to be 
used outside 110-125 volts, though.
-- 
tom_p
pfau --http://nbpfaus.net/~pfau/

10) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Tom,
I'm glad to hear you'll be offering the Gene Cafe and even more glad
that you'll be giving it your extensive testing before offering it.
I am really looking forward to hearing your thoughts on this machine
and how it stacks up with the others available to the homeroasting
community.
From what I've read and understand, it sounds like it should be better
than the iRoast2 and somewhere around the SC/TO for homeroasting
quality.  Haven't used a HotTop, so don't know about it.
--
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO & i'Roast2

11) From: Matthew Price
On 3/28/06, Thomas Pfau  wrote:
<Snip>
Agreed, but /inside/ that range it isn't unreasonable to expect
consistent results.  From the posts I've seen some of the small
electric roasters expect a full 120V or they won't roast coffee.
The real point, though, was to get an idea of the machine's stability.
 You don't know where the limit is until you cross it.  If this
machine will do the same roast whether the supply is 110 or 120,
that's good to know; if it's results are all over the map and will
require stable power to operate, that's also good to know.
Matthew

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Very good idea. I should have thought of that ... yes, I will -Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Jeremy DeFranco
 Thanks Tom (and everyone else too) for the replies. I am confused, though,
when you say you have 4 models you will be testing. Are you referring only
to the Gene Cafe or both the Gene Cafe and some new Hottops as well? I
really appreciate you testing out the new products. I'll look forward to
hearing the results. Jeremy

14) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
So now I'm torn, conflicted, and unsure. My Z&D's has been fully amortized so I've started shopping around for something I have more control over. I was seriously thinking of a HotTop, but with all the talk of the Gene Caffe I'm wondering if I should order that when it becomes available. Will the new stuff coming out in April be worth waitingfor? Oris this like buying a computer - no matter what you buy there will be something newer and faster in two months.
Advice, please.
Frank Parth

15) From: Steve Hay
On 3/29/06, Frank Parth  wrote:
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
fe
<Snip>
new
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
I'd personally go with the tried and true technology if I were in the marke=
t
for one of these babies.
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com

16) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
If any of the 1/2 lb roasters had the electronics to allow me to set 
temperature ramps like the folks who added PID controllers to their air 
roasters, I don't think I'd be waiting much longer. Trouble is, even 
those on the horizon don't seem to have such controls.
Dave S.
Frank Parth wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.3/295 - Release Date: 3/28/2006

17) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Eventually, mfgrs will make their machines with USB interface and include a CD 
so you can program and upload profiles.   But the market will have to become 
more competitive first.  Dan

18) From: Martina Augustinova
The Gene Café is apparently working on a digital model:http://www.genecafe.co.kr/It's still under development, but hopefully some details might be
available soon. It's kind of greyed out, besides the analog model. This
existing model looks quite nice, let's see what the digital model has to
offer.
Regards,
Martina

19) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
You don't want it, trust me. the so-called analog model is infinitely 
better, the controls make sense, easy to use, endlessly modifiable 
(hmm- is that a word?) during the roast. imho, i believe now that 
true roast curve programming is best done on a pc - you need that 
level of graphic interface to really do it right. the HW approach of 
holding down 2 buttons, holding down another button, waiting, pushing 
another button, holding another button (repeat 4 more times) is going 
to lead people, myself included, to simply use pre-sets after a 
while. well, they changed the presets to match my roast curves i sent 
them after the i-roast one came out, so in a way i am roasting on my 
custom curve, ...
Ånyway, I havent been able to pick up my production models - they 
were sent from oakland to utah by mistake! they will be early next 
week, me thinks...
Tom
BTW: I was wondering why list traffic had slowed down ... well, turns 
out 80% of the posts were getting sorted into my JUNK mailbox. Oops. 
I straightened it out.
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

20) From: raymanowen
We've got to have push buttons and automation that will satisfy fewer and
fewer people, the more complex the controls get. The bean agitation looks
interesting...
Cheers RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

21) From: Michael Wascher
Thank you Martina,
It does look like it has a chaff collector, small, medium, or optional larg=
e
(large with disposable filters for smoke?). So maybe you aren't locked into
their low-chaff beans?
--MikeW
On 3/30/06, Martina Augustinova  wrote:
<Snip>
--
"Life is just one damned thing after another."
  - Elbert Hubbard

22) From: Jeffrey Pawlan
Dan wrote:
"Eventually, mfgrs will make their machines with USB interface and include a CD
so you can program and upload profiles.   But the market will have to become
more competitive first.  Dan "
I have successfully completed this and delivered a number of working units to
customers all over the country. My CCR has a USB interface and not only can you
program the profiles on the fly, you can create or edit profiles in a separate
program and store as many as you wish on your computer to be recalled at will
by the roasting program.  The repeatability is usually less than 10 seconds!
 look at www.computercontrolledroaster.com
Only bad news is that it is too costly for most home enthusiasts so I am going
to Charlotte next week to talk to commercial roasters.
Regards,
Jeffrey Pawlan

23) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
My understanding (may be wrong) is that digital equipment + heat =
ditigal equipment that doesn't last long.
A friend likes using those rotisserie ovens.  She has an old analog
one that's still going strong.  She went back to using it after three
of the digital ones died early deaths after 6 mos - 1 year of use.
Have the techniques improved for insulating/protecting the digital
parts of consumer cooking/roasting equipment?
--
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO & i'Roast2

24) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
I don't have a problem with using a separate controller box, as Jeffrey 
Pawlan's web site shows.
In theory, that is, I don't actually have one. Too rich for my budget!
Dave S.
Brent - SC/TO Roasting wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.3/296 - Release Date: 3/29/2006

25) From: Jim Russell
Jeffrey,
Can you define "too costly"?  I might be interested in hotrodding my hottop=
.
Jim
On 3/30/06, Jeffrey Pawlan  wrote:
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
s
<Snip>

26) From: Martina Augustinova
Hi Tom,
Thanks very much for the info. I've only just got the I-Roast2, so I'm
not suffering from any upgrade fever (yet), but it would be nice to hear
more about the Gene Café roaster. But it doesn't look like there is =
much
info around on this roaster. I wonder whether the European market will
offer it at all (living in Europe sometimes complicates things, when it
comes to coffee).
Perhaps one just has to be patient :-)
Regards,
Martina

27) From: Jim Mitchell
The Gene Cafe has been available in GB, Italy, and Australia for a several 
months now - it's the US which lagged behind in distribution.
Cheers
Jim

28) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
I think it falls into the category of "if you have to ask ...".
Dave S.
Jim Russell wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.3/296 - Release Date: 3/29/2006

29) From: J.B.
You can order the Gene Café Roster via www.hasbean.co.uk for 389,99 €. I 
heard a lot of positive things about it.
Did you have any problems concerning the temperature in lower ranges 
with your I-Roast2 ?
I also own the european version of it and it's always heating up until 
it reaches 200 °C or some degrees more. Even if you set the temperature 
to be 160 °C for all stages. Since I got no answer from hearthware i'm 
still wondering if this is normal for european IRoasts because I heard 
about the same issues from other european home roasters.
Jan
Martina Augustinova wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Rich Adams
The Gene Cafe is now available from a US firm to members of the Green Coffee 
Buying Club who expressed interest.  However, I think I would heed Tom's 
warning regarding being the first of the first.
Respectfully,
Rich "very happy w/ the RK" Adams

31) From: Ed Needham
I think it's more likely that computer manufacturers will outfit computers 
with a coffee roaster as a peripheral before homeroaster manufacturers get a 
USB port figured out.  Computer geeks are voracious coffee fiends.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

32) From: Jim Russell
An excellent idea!  Turn of your cpu cooler and roast some beans.  Then a
throw in a heat exchanger and a pump, and voila, espresso!
On 3/30/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
m
<Snip>

33) From: Michael Wade
Jan:
My (US) iR2 also overshoots the programmed setting (325 F), but only in 
stage 1.  The indicated temp goes up to 350 by the end of the 2 minutes, but 
the chaff collector temp only reaches about 330 - 332 F.
Stage 2, programmed at 370 F, holds at 375 indicated as the chaff collector 
temp gradually rises to 385 by the end of 3 minutes.
I program stage 3 to 450F for 5 minutes and it rises to exactly 450 
indicated in about 2 minutes and holds there while the chaff collector temp 
follows about a minute behind.
If as Tom has mentioned, the roaster controlls the temp by varying fan speed 
with a constant heat input, it seems the roaster has borderline (or less) 
air flow capacity to hold the lowest programmable temperatures, say below 
350 F as a guess.  Once mine gets above that it does surprisingly well at 
holding programmed temp.
The temps you are reporting, 160 C  (320 F) programmed rising to 200 C (392 
F) indicated don't seem particularly excessive given the above premise.  I 
don't think the machine is capable of limiting temperature to 160 C for any 
period of time.
I'm not sure how much difference it makes what temp you program for the 
first 2 minutes anyway.  The heat input versus thermal mass will cause the 
temperature to follow a somewhat reasonable curve anyway and at 2 minutes or 
so you will be into a temperature range that my machine, at least, can 
control.
If you're still having trouble, you might try programming 160C for 2 
minutes, 185-190C for 3 minutes and 230-235C for 5 minutes, ignore stage 1 
and see if the machine can hold the programmed temps in stages 2 & 3.
Michael Wade

34) From: Martina Augustinova
Hi Jan,
Thanks for your mail about the Café Gene. I'll wait and see what =
people
think about this roaster before I consider buying one - and especially
I'll wait till it comes to German/Italian markets because of the plug
and the price - it seems to be cheaper in Germany most of the times. The
European models run hot, but I begin to get decent results after
experimenting a lot with the settings. Here is what I ended up with:
Try to roast fewer beans - now I roast maximum 140 g beans, which is
enough for me anyways.
I've been using 2 profiles lately and begin to get some good results:
1. Profile 1 - 140 g beans:
Temp:		Time:
162		2 min
190		3 min
212		6 min
I would stop the roast around 2 minutes before the end if I roast for
French press (morning coffee) as I don't like dark roasts that much for
French press. That gives you about 9 minutes of roasting.
I get the first crack with 5-6 minutes remaining (and it would stop
around 4 minutes remaining). Then about 3 - 2 minutes remaining I would
get the second crack, but it's not consistent.
1. Profile 2 - 140 g beans (if you roast Brazilian as an espresso base).
But I reckon you could just use profile 1 and let it run longer in
stead. 
Temp:		Time:
162		2 min
190		3 min
224		6 min
Try and roast fewer beans, see what happens. My beans are generally
coldish as I store them in a cold cupboard, perhaps that my mean
something, I don't know. I was frustrated with the I-Roast the first
week, but somehow it "settled down". I'm quite happy with it now - much
depends on the beans as well. I have best results with "clean" beans -
Costa Rica, Guatemala, PNG.
Hope it helps a bit - good luck!
Best regards,
Martina

35) From: Dan Bollinger
Ed,  You may be right.  My new computer came with this neat, motorized, 
retractible mug holder!   ;)  Dan
<Snip>

36) From:
Ed:
Right one with that...
I saw in Wired last year a coffee cup heater USB connected.
ginny
<Snip>

37) From: John Blumel
On Mar 31, 2006, at 8:28 am,  wrote:
<Snip>
I own one of those, although, I've been meaning to take it apart and  
flip it over so I can use it as a beer cooler.
John Blumel

38) From: J.B.
Hi Michael,
thanks a lot for you answer and the effort and work you put into it.
I'm not really wondering that much that the I-Roast cannot keep 160 °C 
(320 F) but that it always will heat up to at least 200 °C (392 F) 
within the first 2 (2,5) minutes.
I tried to set the temperature to be 170 °C in stage 2, but it even went 
up until 209 °C. Then it was kept constant.
A stage set with a temperature of  220 °C (428 F) led to a temperature 
of 225 °C (437 F).
So, yes, it gets better with higher temperatures. But as 200 °C is the 
minimum temperature - and the roast with my I-Roast then takes 7, 
sometimes 8 minutes - i can only do much faster roasts than this - so 
I'm wondering how people get a 9 minute - or even 12 minute roast out of 
it ??
I guess I would be happy if my machinw would just be able to control a 
temperature just some degrees lower, so that the roast would take 
longer, like 180 °C (356 F) - that would be enough for me. But the fan 
won't start to cool things down below 200 °C :(
Regards
Jan
Michael Wade wrote:
<Snip>

39) From:
John:
great idea!!
ginny
<Snip>

40) From: Michael Wade
Jan
With the program I suggested I'm getting to first crack in (roughly, of 
course) 6 minutes, and 2nd, if I let it go that long, in about 8 minutes. 
So I guess longer roasts are a mystery to me too.
Since this machine is a replacement for my brain-damaged Precision, these 
roast times seem familiar to me, but I see your point.  I had expected to be 
able to program slower roasts and was going crazy trying to slow them down. 
In the end I just adjusted my expectations, I guess.
As I roast more batches I will continue to experiment.  Maybe a lower, 
longer second stage...  I tried a low temperature third stage and wound up 
with baked lusterless beans, so that is not an option.
Mary and I only drink a total of 3 cups a day, our temperament and 
physiology reacting unfavorably to more than that (is that heresy on this 
list?), so I don't roast as often now with the larger batches in the iR2.
Let me know if you find the secret,
Michael

41) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Michael Wade wrote:
<Snip>
In my heavily mod'ed p1 I shoot for 1st at about 9 minutes, and then 
stretch out the roast to 11 1/2 or 12 1/2.  Thats means I'm ramping at ~ 
10 degrees per minute for the final stage.
FYI, the faster you roast, the darker the beans will look on the 
outside, and the hotter a TC will report for color & crack based events.
<Snip>
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

42) From: J.B.
Hi J.W.Bullfrog
What kind of roaster is a p1 ?  A Precision Roast ?
Furthermore what kind of mods did you make ?
Regards
Jan
<Snip>

43) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Read this,
later in the article it shows my roaster.http://www.homeroaster.com/geekmod.htmlJ.B. wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
-- 
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers 
exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will 
instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more 
bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

44) From: Scott Marquardt
What's funny about this is imagining how the program that controls the
profile would generate more heat. In the case that more BTUs need to be
added, a loop that drives the CPUs to 100% utilization would be executed. I=
f
extra heat were needed, a beefy video card with heat sinks of its own would
start doing massive 3D game sequences.
Seems half practical, judging from the exploits of overclockers:http://www.octools.com/index.cgi?caller=articles/submersion/submersion13.=html
(link is several pages into the story)
What a waste of BTUs! Those could be going into greens!
;-)
On 3/30/06, Jim Russell  wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: Brett Mason
You could load a copy of WIndows Vista Beta - and accomplish the same...
Sipping Colombia Huila, French Press
  Brett
On 3/31/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
 If
<Snip>
ld
<Snip>
3.html
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

46) From: Scott Marquardt
Nah. The roast would stall.
;-)
Voice of experience here.
On 3/31/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

47) From: M. McCandless
The chart on this link has saved me many hours of
"poke & hope".
I have to thank you for pointing me in this direction.
My profiles have been approaching what I saw but 
the road has been shortened much.
Stretching the time to 1st crack from 5 to 6 mins & 
the time to 2nd an additional 6 - 8 (was 4 - 5)
would have taken considerable time & precious coffee.
Tasted the 1st new batch today & I'm VERY satisfied.
So many variables . . .
So little time.
McSparky
At 01:11 PM 3/31/2006 -0500, you wrote:
<Snip>
 course) 6 minutes, and 2nd, if I let it go that long, in about 8 minutes.=
 So I guess longer roasts are a mystery to me too.
<Snip>
 these roast times seem familiar to me, but I see your point.  I had=
 expected to be able to program slower roasts and was going crazy trying to=
 slow them down. In the end I just adjusted my expectations, I guess.
<Snip>
 longer second stage...  I tried a low temperature third stage and wound up=
 with baked lusterless beans, so that is not an option.
<Snip>
 stretch out the roast to 11 1/2 or 12 1/2.  Thats means I'm ramping at ~ 10=
 degrees per minute for the final stage.
<Snip>
 and the hotter a TC will report for color & crack based events.
<Snip>
 physiology reacting unfavorably to more than that (is that heresy on this=
 list?), so I don't roast as often now with the larger batches in the iR2.
<Snip>
 went
<Snip>
 stage 1.  The indicated temp goes up to 350 by the end of the 2 minutes,=
 but the chaff collector temp only reaches about 330 - 332 F.
<Snip>
 collector temp gradually rises to 385 by the end of 3 minutes.
<Snip>
 indicated in about 2 minutes and holds there while the chaff collector temp=
 follows about a minute behind.
<Snip>
 speed with a constant heat input, it seems the roaster has borderline (or=
 less) air flow capacity to hold the lowest programmable temperatures, say=
 below 350 F as a guess.  Once mine gets above that it does surprisingly=
 well at holding programmed temp.
<Snip>
 (392 F) indicated don't seem particularly excessive given the above=
 premise.  I don't think the machine is capable of limiting temperature to=
 160 C for any period of time.
<Snip>
 first 2 minutes anyway.  The heat input versus thermal mass will cause the=
 temperature to follow a somewhat reasonable curve anyway and at 2 minutes=
 or so you will be into a temperature range that my machine, at least, can=
 control.
<Snip>
 minutes, 185-190C for 3 minutes and 230-235C for 5 minutes, ignore stage 1=
 and see if the machine can hold the programmed temps in stages 2 & 3.
<Snip>
 €. I
<Snip>
 temperature
<Snip>
 i'm
<Snip>
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http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
 the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be=
 replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.
<Snip>
 unsvbscribes) go to=
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

48) From: Steve Hay
People are talking about using a computer to control their roasts...  Might
I ask how they do this?  Labview?  I have some ideas for roasters, but I
stumble on how to actually integrate all of the components into a control
algorithm and esp into a computer DAS or something.  I'm thinking a Mac Min=
i
might be a good roasting aid.  Nice and small and maybe surfing the interne=
t
would be possible while roasting.
On a slightly related topic, do those Turbo Oven things have a fan?  I'm
wondering if it would be possible to do some sort of forced convection thin=
g
where there were holes to allow air to flow.  Maybe if I'm going that
direction I should just start with a Poppery.  I'm kinda trying to get the
ability to do 1-2 lb roasts though..
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
A Little Fable
by Franz Kafka
"Alas," said the mouse, "the whole world is growing smaller every day. At
the beginning it was so big that I was afraid, I kept running and running,
and I was glad when I saw walls far away to the right and left, but these
long walls have narrowed so quickly that I am in the last chamber already,
and there in the corner stands the trap that I must run into." "You only
need to change your direction," said the cat, and ate it up.

49) From: Peter Zulkowski
Steve,
Yes they have a fan!
And the really sweet thing is that they recirculate the air they heat!
The motor stays outside the chamber, the shaft goes through a 
preliminary chamber which houses the wires and switches etc and is 
cooled by a fan mounted on this shaft, then it goes into the roasting 
chamber where it turns a fan that either sucks air through a heating 
coil, or blows air through the coil .
The chamber is protected from the coils radiant heat by a perforated 
disk of some sort which helps to form the path for recirculating the air.
Very neat set up.
Inexpensive also.
PeterZ
Another .02 from me today, here in LHC.
Steve Hay wrote:
<Snip>

50) From: Gary Townsend
Peter Zulkowski 

51) From: Peter Zulkowski
Gary you think like I do.... scary huh.
What did come to mind while trying to get 3# of beans to stay INSIDE  my 
new bread machine/ TO roaster was using a router to replace the bread 
machine.
It does have plenty of torque, and a variac would tame its RPM eccentricity.
Hmmm.. elements from electric ranges are cheap and available.
Half horse motors.. the same.
Fan blades are all over. Next to nothing.
Instead of a Z&D thingie,
how about a prop from a 125 HP outboard?
That would do well coupled to a 3/4 HP router.
Mounted in the bottom of an 8 gal SS trash can..
or a 15 gallon SS beer keg.
Talk about mixing the beans :)
And the chaff would be self extracting when you hinge back the super turbo.
Throttle the router so that the prop just blows out the chaff and not 
the beans.
PeterZ
What a way to wake up, here in LHC.
Gary Townsend wrote:
<Snip>

52) From: Aaron
yah, either a super bean mixer or the worlds largest blender for 
crushing ice and making margaritas!.
Better insulate that thing very well or you will bleed a ton of btu's 
out the sides trying to keep the temp up.
a wrap of fiberglass might work.
the coupling now, there might be tricky, .. might want a longer rod/pole 
or coupling device to give it some heat sink area for heat travelling 
down the coupling to the motor so you don't start cooking the motor 
bearings which I am sure are not designed for temps in that range.
Aaron


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