HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The Starbucks Truth (3 msgs / 148 lines)
1) From: Steve Trescott
Here's the truth, right from their own web site:
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1971 Starbucks opens its first location in Seattle's Pike Place Market. 
 
1982 Howard Schultz joins Starbucks as director of retail operations and marketing. Starbucks begins providing coffee to fine restaurants and espresso bars. 
 
1983 Schultz travels to Italy, where he's impressed with the popularity of espresso bars in Milan. He sees the potential in Seattle to develop a similar coffee bar culture. 
 
1984 Schultz convinces the founders of Starbucks to test the coffee bar concept in a new location in downtown Seattle. This successful experiment is the genesis for a company that Schultz founds in 1985.
Starbucks introduces Christmas Blend. 
 
1985 Schultz founds Il Giornale, offering brewed coffee and espresso beverages made from Starbucks coffee beans. 
 
1987 With the backing of local investors, Il Giornale acquires Starbucks assets and changes its name to Starbucks Corporation.
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Schultz has always been in marketing and is originally from NY. So yes, Starbucks is all about marketing. The original owners were focused on taste.
steve
In Seattle, was a Starbucks customer at one point in my life.
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2) From: John - wandering Texas
That original store in the corner of Pike Place Market was worth the 6 block
round trip to enjoy an incredible cup of coffee - when it became popular it
only slipped slightly on taste.  We moved away just shortly after the second
location in the Banker was launched - drawing fans from all over the area.
Living in California and then Indiana - we were amazed to follow the
explosion of stores.  We had to go all the way up to Chicago (2.5 hours one
way) to find a store in the late 80's.  when they hooked up with Barnes &
Nobel (then the larges book store) they became ubiquitous and the quality
suffered greatly - but it was still a great cup if you didn't know about
home roasting.
Just an old guys perspective.

3) From: Andy Conn
Have you read Howard Schultz's book?  Although I haven't I have heard from
other who have that Howard was fired on by his obsession/passion for great
coffee.  Your post below speaks to that.  If he didn't care about the
product so much, he would've just created his own roastery rather than
acquire SB.
I have no doubt that Starbucks has fallen from what it once was.  After all,
how good can you feel now that Starbucks beans are available in the local
Safeway stored sitting on the shelf for who knows how long.  The loyalty to
freshness is definitely gone.  Another blow was when they went to the
automated espresso machines in the stores.  Now they probably won't even
bother training the Barristas.
- A


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