HomeRoast Digest


Topic: did you wash your hands first? (11 msgs / 265 lines)
1) From: john
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
here's a question for everyone.
i keep all my coffee paraphernalia in a single, narrow, three shelf =
cabinet in the kitchen.  greens are on top, roasted coffee stored in =
small mason jars are in the middle, and cups on the bottom.
after roasting, i let the coffee degas in open jars on the middle shelf =
over night, and put the lids on in the morning.
i know i'm micro-analyzing at this point, but, is there any hazard in =
keeping greens in close proximity to (or on top of) roasted coffee which =
is ready for consumption?  i'm curious about the dust and debris that =
you find in the bags.
thanks,
john
way too concerned about the small stuff
here in pearland, tx

2) From:
Good Morning John:
Hey guy, small stuff is very important. My answer to you wouldbe NO; there is no problem with having grenns, roasted, whatever in the same place. If a little dust get in, so what?
I am curious why you leave the jars open all night and cover them in the morning. Why not fogive yourself any worry about dust and put the lids on?
In Pearland I would be more worried about mice running through my cabinet then some dust.
Enjoy your coffee John and not to worry.
regards,
ginny
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3) From:
Good Morning John:
Hey guy, small stuff is very important. My answer to you wouldbe NO; there is no problem with having grenns, roasted, whatever in the same place. If a little dust get in, so what?
I am curious why you leave the jars open all night and cover them in the morning. Why not fogive yourself any worry about dust and put the lids on?
In Pearland I would be more worried about mice running through my cabinet then some dust.
Enjoy your coffee John and not to worry.
regards,
ginny
<Snip>

4) From: john
too true, ginny.  mice would probably be the more realistic concern. 
although we've not found any in our house, i recall one particular evening 
when i still lived at home.  after supper my family was sitting in the 
living room watching tv.  to my surprise, in strolls a mouse and takes a 
seat midway along the wall, in plain view.  i couldn't believe it. i guess 
he wanted to see what was on, too.
but back to coffee, when i'm measuring out my greens before roasting i can't 
help but think that these very beans came from some other country and could 
have been scattered about on someone's patio, walked on, and who knows what 
else.
i obviously have an active imagination.
as far as leaving them uncovered, it seems i remember reading that that's 
what tom does.  and, i've noticed that the fragrance is nicer than when i 
close them up immediately.  i enjoy that part as much as how it turns out in 
the cup.
john

5) From: Obrien, Haskell W.
Why do you leave the lids off? Have you every tried one of the valve
bags? It takes a significant effort to move air out of those valves.
Just leaving the lid attached loosely should allow the beans to degas
just fine. Having the lid sitting loosely will allow the gas out and
help keep any new oxygen from entering.
When my wife hasn't stolen all my jars to use as glasses, this is what I
do.

6) From: Brett Mason
John,
You could put the lids on, but not tighten them down.  Dust would likely no=
t
get in, yet the CO2 would release....
In the Philippines, grain, nuts and coffee are dried on the highway.  Peopl=
e
will spread the produc on one half of the road, and mark it with cones.
They will rake it and sweep it to get it completely dry, then bag it and
take it to market.  I still miss Barako coffee - can't get it outside of
RP.  This is also why rocks appear in coffee...
Brett
On 4/5/06, john  wrote:
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g
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s
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e
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--
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   ...who wants to sell his Silvia and pursue an espresso machine upgrade..=
.

7) From:
John:
Great mouse story, those little guys always like artoons!!
Back to coffee, I reall think is goes again to your own "feelings" if you will about your coffee stock. I have tried different methods over these last few years. I tend to use mason jars for my roasted since, as you mentioned, opening them up is a very romantic experience, gosh it smells so good.
Sometimes I leave them open on the sink just to see if there is a difference in my shots. Usually not so I basically put the top on tight, gas it out a couple of times and then itgone.
If I am roasting for a friend or at the Phoenix Public Market I gas valve bags and seal them asap with my Hot Jaw.
Try all sorts of ways, you will most likey surprise yourself.
I am sure beans get stepped on as well as other things happening o them but once roasted, no issue!
Continue to enjoy your discovery...
regards,
ginny
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8) From: M. McCandless
Being new to roasting I am still experimenting.
Not quite in the fine tuning stage yet.
Lately I've been cooling roasts to <120 and putting in sealed jars.
As they finish cooling, they create a vacuum, partially compensating
for the pressure buildup.
Just a thought.
McSparky
At 10:37 AM 4/5/2006 -0500, you wrote:
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9) From: Philip Keleshian
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I treat green coffee as raw food which should be cooked.  I wash =
measuring cups and other vessels which I use for green coffee before I =
use them for any thing else.
 
Phil

10) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
A simple solution would be to store the greens on the bottom, the =
roasted in the middle and cups on the top.
Coffees come from all over the world an handles by many people, after =
roasting I have never had a problem, but I do wash my hands after =
handling green coffee.
RK

11) From: Aaron
well.  Howard hughes said it was ok to do john so i don't think you will 
have any problems with it yourself.
Also, remember you are throwing water at close to 200 degrees on the 
beans to turn them into coffee, so any creepie crawlies that might make 
their way into there I am sure would be cooked pretty quick.
aaron


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