HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Alton Brown (34 msgs / 957 lines)
1) From: Scot Murphy
I'm sure this has popped up on this list well before I joined, but  
since the episode of "Good Eats" was just on, I thought I would bring  
it up. He talked about brewing coffee and, like most smart people who  
know something about coffee, he didn't quite know enough. For  
instance, he preferred the pour-over cone method of brewing (as do  
many), but was off when it came to coffee age. Yes, he mentioned  
fresh roasting, but he seemed to think that storing fresh coffee in a  
sealed valve bag was the same as putting it in stasis. His opinion  
was that coffee could store for up to three months that way. He  
mentioned home roasting once in a sentence, was five degrees off on  
the optimum brew temp (he said 190-205F rather than 195-205), and  
gave probably one minute too much on brew time (four to five minutes  
rather than three to four). He did mention the perils of  
overextraction, though, and gave the Golden Measure of two  
tablespoons grounds to six ounces water.
Oh, yes--he was messed up on the grinder. He was right in insisting  
that you grind your own beans (I liked his analogy that you wouldn't  
ask the cashier at the store to uncork your champagne), but he  
insisted that a blade grinder was just fine, even mentioning it for  
espresso. He seemed to be unaware of evenness of grind, but then, he  
was preaching to beginners. He also mentioned that different areas of  
the world gave different flavors in the same way wine grapes do, but  
I disagree with his idea that Sumatran/Indonesian are all "funky."  
Sumatran, yes, but Papua New Guinea? Nay! Then again, he did say he  
was over-generalizing.
What else could he do in half an hour? Luckily, given the amount of  
territory he had to cover, he kept his shtick to a minimum and tried  
hard to inform, but I would have liked to have seen other brewing  
methods--french press and vac-pot especially. (He could have done  
five minutes on the once-widespread method and how it was taken over  
by percolators and then drip.) Espresso would have been a good thing  
to cover, too, but this *was* meant for beginners and he did only  
have half an hour.
All in all, had I seen this show when twenty years ago, I would have  
been stunned. "Fresh roasted? Pour-over? Do tell!" And somewhere out  
there is a twenty-four year old who is seeing this show and saying  
the same thing.
Scot "a Poppery awaits that person" Murphy
--------
"Liberty is not a matter of words, but a positive and important  
condition of society. Its greatest safeguard after placing its  
foundations in a popular base, is in the checks and balances imposed  
on the public servants."
	--JAMES FENIMORE COOPER

2) From: Jason Molinari
this has been discussed many time, and each time
people mention a few nitpicky items that he did or
didn't do. Personally i think the show was great. It
was definitely NOT aimed at people like us, but rather
at people who drink folgers made the night before. 
As you said, for the time he had, and the audience
target, it was, i think, as good as it could/should
be. Immagine if he told people they HAD to get a burr
grinder....BOOM there goes 3/4 of the people he was
talking to. I think the show was spot on, other than
for the age and valve bags.
just IMHO
jason
--- Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

3) From: Justin Bean
I'm 22 years old and would have known that most of the things that Alton
Brown was saying were essentially incorrect =P  I'm a bit obsessed tho...
- Justin

4) From: Jason Molinari
what exactly did he say that was "incorrect". he said
to use fresh coffee, freshly ground to the right
fineness and good water at that temperature. I'm not
sure what exactly is incorrect about all of that.
Seems spot on to me.
--- Justin Bean  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

5) From: Don Cummings
Funny funny,
After reading the original post I thought I would like to check out this
episode.  I did a google search to see if it might be streamed online. Then
I saw that it was scheduled to air on the 20th. I went to set my DVR to
record it and 'lo and behold'  there it was in my list of recorded shows!
Apparently my wife had seen the description and set it to record for
me. What a good woman!
Cheers
Don
That's 'Good Drinks'  (trademark infringement?)

6) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
Justin,
I'm going to offer a different opinion. What Alton said was not incorrect, it just wasn't as "high end" as most of the people on this list would do. As someone said earlier in this thread, what Alton said was a significant improvement over how most of his viewers make coffee.
Just as in his shows on cooking, the results are a lot better than most people get normally, even if it's not as advanced as a professional chef would produce. The coffee show is the same way.
His recipes can be downloaded from www.foodtv.com.
Frank Parth

7) From: Tim Schutt
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Personally, I'm still waiting for him to do a followup episode or  
two... he's done at least 4 on chocolate, don't you think that coffee  
would deserve at least two?!?
But I do think that the spirit of the home roaster with all of our  
hand-made gadgetry would be in complete line with his show. I'd like  
to see him make a home roaster out of a small garbage can, an old  
record player, and a couple of electric charcoal starters. And  
imagine the animation sequence when he describes Kopi Luwak. :-)
Myself and my warped sense of humor now humbly sign off... (it's been  
a really slow day at work)
Tim
On Apr 14, 2006, at 3:20 PM, Frank Parth wrote:
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Personally, I'm still =
waiting for him to do a followup episode or two... he's done at least 4 =
on chocolate, don't you think that coffee would deserve at least =
two?!?
But I = do think that the spirit of the home roaster with all of our hand-made = gadgetry would be in complete line with his show. I'd like to see him = make a home roaster out of a small garbage can, an old record player, = and a couple of electric charcoal starters. And imagine the animation = sequence when he describes Kopi Luwak. :-)
Myself and my warped sense = of humor now humbly sign off... (it's been a really slow day at = work)
Tim O= n Apr 14, 2006, at 3:20 PM, Frank Parth wrote:

Justin,

I'm going to offer a = different opinion. What Alton said was not incorrect, it just wasn't as = "high end" as most of the people on this list would do. As someone said = earlier in this thread, what Alton said was a significant improvement = over how most of his viewers make coffee.

Just as = in his shows on cooking, the results are a lot better than most people = get normally, even if it's not as advanced as a professional chef would = produce. The coffee show is the same way.

His = recipes can be downloaded from www.foodtv.com.

Frank Parth

= = --Apple-Mail-6--765526975--

8) From: Don Cummings
I agree with you Frank.
I've watched a lot of GE episodes but I watch more for entertainment value
than education.  I consider myself an pretty accomplished home chef and
enjoy the "chemistry" of cooking that he shows but I often find his
techniques pedantic and 'anal.'  He reminds me of the Phil Hartman characte=
r
on SNL.  On the other hand I find that he does a great job of explaining ho=
w
individual ingredients combine and interact to achieve a final probuct.
In this coffee episode I could find no glaring errors.  The 4-5 min time he
quoted was for a manual drip afterall.  This is correct. 3-4 mins is
appropriate for FP.  He mentioned 190-205 as the ideal temp but he used a
very sound technique for hitting the right temp.  Bring just to a boil and
let sit for a min.  (I love my teapot because I can tell exactly when the
temp hits 200 by the sound in the pot.  I don't even have to measure
anymore.)  One thing I was surprised about is that he is satisfied with a
blade grinder. A fancy burr mill is his style (and I would bet large $ that
this is what he actually uses.)
IMO, Overall his advice would improve 90% of the coffee being brewed in the
average home 100%.  As for us homeroasters.  I think it says something if w=
e
are being more anal than Alton Brown.  (When I embarked upon the adventure
of homeroasting I told my wife to shoot me if I showed signs of becoming a
coffee snob.  That was a mistake. I am now recovering nicely from several
bullet wounds to the chest, thank you very much.)
Cheers
Don
On 4/14/06, Frank Parth  wrote:
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,
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 As
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9) From: Sandy Andina
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He's got a terrific reference book on kitchen gear--useful and an  
entertaining read.
On Apr 14, 2006, at 2:20 PM, Frank Parth wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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He's got a terrific reference =
book on kitchen gear--useful and an entertaining read.
On =
Apr 14, 2006, at 2:20 PM, Frank Parth wrote:
I'm 22 years old and would have = known that most of the things that AltonBrown = was saying were essentially incorrect =P  I'm a bit obsessed = tho... - Justin I'm going to offer a different = opinion. What Alton said was not incorrect, it just wasn't as "high end" = as most of the people on this list would do. As someone said earlier in = this thread, what Alton said was a significant improvement over how most = of his viewers make coffee. Just as in his shows on cooking, = the results are a lot better than most people get normally, even if it's = not as advanced as a professional chef would produce. The coffee show is = the same way. His recipes can be downloaded from www.foodtv.com. Frank = Parthhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-48--764355154--

10) From: Don Cummings
I just let my wife read this paragraph.  She responded "you forgot to
mention that you just ordered a burlap sack to hang on our kitchen wall.  I
was fine until then. Now its time for an intervention!"
Don
Addicted in Ohio
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g
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rom
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11) From: Steve Hay
On 4/14/06, Jason Molinari  wrote:
<Snip>
I tend to agree.  Not to nit-pick on the OP (I love a good on-topic thread
and wouldn't have known of this show if it hadn't been mentioned) but I
think folks like us need to keep the larger picture in perspective in terms
of what the general public knows about coffee.  When seen from this angle, =
a
show like this is encouraging because it means someone has convinced someon=
e
else that the topic of coffee is important to dedicate some time to, and it
is a sign that the coffee industry may undergo some exciting changes in the
next few years because of it (and other factors).
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

12) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Well put, Steven!
We are all fortunate enough to have discovered homeroasting.  Which is not
necessarily everyone's cup of tea.  I mean, I like chicken but am just not
inclined to raise my own (enough experience with it as a kid).
TV, radio, etc. program's like AB's do let folks know they can get better
coffee and prepare better coffee.  Then, if they're so inclined, there's a
whole other world to explore - home roasting, artisan roasters, etc.
--
Brent
My coffee is better than it tastes

13) From: Tara Kollas
I always liked Alton Brown - more chemistry with cooking and less snobbery.
My husband isn't a huge fan of the cooking shows, but likes his stuff.  Use=
d
to like Emeril - now he's gone off a bit for me.  I could live a while
without hearing bam again.
I can't remember who posted it, but I think there's something to be said fo=
r
scaring off folks by saying you need a burr grinder.  My co-workers, who
know some of my coffee obsession, find it amazing that my coffee grinder
cost more than twice what my espresso machine cost.
On 4/14/06, Brent - SC/TO Roasting  wrote:
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t
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t
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a
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14) From: Sandy Andina
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I used to watch "Taste" with David Rosengarten when it was on the  
Food Network several years ago. He could be a pompous a** at times  
(like when he had his daughters on the "Madeleines" episode and read  
to them from Proust while serving them tea and madeleines at the  
show's end), but he was always knowledgeable and entertaining.  He  
now has an interactive off-B'way show about coffee cupping, I think.
On Apr 14, 2006, at 11:32 PM, Tara Kollas wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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I used to watch "Taste" with =
David Rosengarten when it was on the Food Network several years ago. He =
could be a pompous a** at times (like when he had his daughters on the =
"Madeleines" episode and read to them from Proust while serving them tea =
and madeleines at the show's end), but he was always knowledgeable and =
entertaining.  He now has an interactive off-B'way show about coffee =
cupping, I think.
On Apr 14, 2006, at 11:32 PM, Tara Kollas =
wrote:
I always liked Alton Brown - more chemistry with = cooking and less snobbery.  My husband isn't a huge fan of the cooking = shows, but likes his stuff.  Used to like Emeril - now he's gone off a = bit for me.  I could live a while without hearing bam again.  = I can't remember who posted it, but I think there's something to be = said for scaring off folks by saying you need a burr grinder.  My = co-workers, who know some of my coffee obsession, find it amazing that = my coffee grinder cost more than twice what my espresso machine cost. =   On 4/14/06, Brent - SC/TO Roasting <sctoroaster> = wrote: Well put, Steven!   = We are all fortunate enough to have discovered homeroasting.  = Which is not necessarily everyone's cup of tea.  I mean, I like = chicken but am just not inclined to raise my own (enough experience with = it as a kid).    TV, radio, etc. program's = like AB's do let folks know they can get better coffee and prepare = better coffee.  Then, if they're so inclined, there's a whole other = world to explore - home roasting, artisan roasters, etc.
-- Brent My coffee is better than it tastes = = --Apple-Mail-81--733732130--

15) From: Tom Gaskell
Sorry, just getting back from vacation ........
On 4/14/06, Don Cummings  wrote:
<Snip>
 One thing I was surprised about is that he is satisfied with a blade
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
Okay, I am going to be an Alton brown apologist here.  It would be a hard
sell to get his viewers to drop $300++ on a grinder.
Even our host (Maria's SO) suggests that a whirly blade does an adequate jo=
b
for drip:http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.electricmills.shtml <-- look for the Bodum
C-Mill
I use a whirly blade for drip and get excellent results.  A trick I picked
up from Cooks, Illustrated magazine was to shake the grinder vertically
while grinding.  The grind so produced is very even, even when compared to
my Zass.
Try it. It may work well enough for your tastes, as mine does.
Cheers,  TomG

16) From: Woody DeCasere
TOm i'll admit that i am a guy whocant drop $300 on a grinder and use my
c-mill for everything but espresso which i use my zass for, i too employ th=
e
shake method and get pretty even results.
On 4/25/06, Tom Gaskell  wrote:
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his
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d
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o
<Snip>
--
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

17) From: Don Cummings
On 4/25/06, Tom Gaskell  wrote:
<Snip>
You must have a huge backlog of mail.
  Okay, I am going to be an Alton brown apologist here.  It would be a hard
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
I agree with this.  I'm just surprised (based on his personality) that he
didn't spend a minute discussing the major benefits that would be derived
from the investment. I simply can't see him using anything but a top of the
line grinder for his own use.
Now as for whirly vs burr for my personal use. I have both. The burr is
cheap and only an incremental improvement over the blade but still an
improvement, especially for FP (80% of my consumption.) I agree that I coul=
d
do okay with the blade but I don't really have the need to.
The next $ I spend on this consuming hobby of mine will be on a quality
grinder.  In the meantime I have serious grinder envy and find myself
looking at my credit accounts every few days and thinking to myself 'I coul=
d
absorb $300.'  The thing that stops me is the fact the I spent around $500
on this hobby already in the past 60 days + my current burr grinder was par=
t
of that $500 + my wife has been very indulgent with me but she might balk
when she sees the Mazzer major show up on our kitchen counter. As it stands
she has no idea that I am sitting on 50+ lbs of greens.
Hope your vacation was pleasant.
Cheers,
Don

18) From: Tom Gaskell
E-mail backlog for five different accounts?  Yep, in the hundreds.
Alton Brown idolizes McGuyver!  Just watch any of the Good eats episodes in
which AB constructs a smoker.  I bet he would get by with a cheap grinder,
since a motorized burr grinder would be considered a "Uni-Tasker," and AB
HATES uni-taskers (other than the fire extingusher).  =8^)
I use my whirly blade (shaken, not stirred) for everything except espresso.
For pulling shots, I use my Zass.  Can't justify the cost of a real one, I'=
d
rather spend my cash for vacations in the FlaKeys.
And my vacation was SPECTACULAR!!!
Cheers,  Tom
On 4/26/06, Don Cummings  wrote:
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e
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en
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e
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he
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uld
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uld
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0
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art
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ds
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19) From: Dennis Parham
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hehehe Tom, since I already live here in south florida, ON THE BEACH  
( well about 2 football fields away...) I opted for the MAZZER Major   
and ROCKY... I have considered a Zass for trips ect... especially  
when the hurricanes hit!! lol
Dennis
On Apr 26, 2006, at 10:06 AM, Tom Gaskell wrote:
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hehehe Tom, since I already live =
here in south florida, ON THE BEACH ( well about 2 football fields =
away...) I opted for the MAZZER Major  and ROCKY... I have considered =
a Zass for trips ect... especially when the hurricanes hit!! =
lol
Dennis
On Apr 26, = 2006, at 10:06 AM, Tom Gaskell wrote:
  E-mail backlog for five different accounts?  Yep, in the = hundreds.   Alton Brown idolizes McGuyver!  = Just watch any of the Good eats episodes in which AB constructs a = smoker.  I bet he would get by with a cheap grinder, since a motorized = burr grinder would be considered a "Uni-Tasker," and AB HATES = uni-taskers (other than the fire extingusher).  =8^) =   I use my whirly blade (shaken, not stirred) for = everything except espresso.  For pulling shots, I use my Zass.  = Can't justify the cost of a real one, I'd rather spend my cash for = vacations in the FlaKeys.   And my vacation was = SPECTACULAR!!!    Cheers,  Tom   =   On 4/26/06, Don Cummings <donrcummings> = wrote: On 4/25/06, Tom Gaskell < tgnytg> wrote: = Sorry, just getting back from vacation ........ =   You must = have a huge backlog of mail.   Okay, I am going to be an Alton brown = apologist here.  It would be a hard sell to get his viewers to drop = $300++ on a grinder.   Even our host (Maria's = SO) suggests that a whirly blade does an adequate job for drip: = http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.electricmills.shtml = <-- look for the Bodum C-Mill   I use a = whirly blade for drip and get excellent results.  A trick I picked up = from Cooks, Illustrated magazine was to shake the grinder vertically = while grinding.  The grind so produced is very even, even when = compared to my Zass.   Try it. It may work well = enough for your tastes, as mine does.   Cheers, = TomG   =   I agree = with this.  I'm just surprised (based on his personality) that he = didn't spend a minute discussing the major benefits that would be = derived from the investment. I simply can't see him using anything but a = top of the line grinder for his own use.   Now = as for whirly vs burr for my personal use. I have both. The burr is = cheap and only an incremental improvement over the blade but still an = improvement, especially for FP (80% of my consumption.) I agree that I = could do okay with the blade but I don't really have the need to. =   The next $ I spend on this consuming hobby of mine = will be on a quality grinder.  In the meantime I have serious grinder = envy and find myself looking at my credit accounts every few days and = thinking to myself 'I could absorb $300.'  The thing that stops me is = the fact the I spent around $500 on this hobby already in the past 60 = days + my current burr grinder was part of that $500 + my wife has been = very indulgent with me but she might balk when she sees the Mazzer = major show up on our kitchen counter. As it stands she has no idea = that I am sitting on 50+ lbs of greens.    = Hope your vacation was pleasant.   = Cheers,   = Don = --Apple-Mail-1-254299966--

20) From: Don Cummings
On 4/26/06, Tom Gaskell  wrote:
<Snip>
,"
<Snip>
Heh Heh, yea I was thinking about that as I wrote that but I hope to god he
is at least keeping the whirly as a uni-tasker. I don't think he would be
getting that response to his coffee from his zombie neighbors if it was
infused with coriander or mustard seed oil.
<Snip>
Maybe I'll give my whirly a shot for a FP. I have to clean my burr with a
mini brush and toothpick every 2 or 3 uses or else I get powder from each
previous grind mixed in.
As far as Florida trips are concerned. I am actually planning on doing Key
West as my next Winter vacation.  However I grew up (from age 12 to 19
anyway) living on the east side of US 1 in Boca Raton so still the grinder
remains a priority (plus vacations come from a different budget. My hobby
comes from the allowance that my wife gives me.)
Don
<Snip>

21) From: javafool
I watched Alton and my opinion was that he didn't have a clue when it comes to great coffee. 
I agree that you can get by with a blade chopper, but a burr grinder does make a big difference in drip coffee and there are good burr grinders available for a lot less that $300.
He indicated that if you buy a canister with a good seal, coffee will stay fresh for at least 30 to 90 days. That made me wonder if Alton has ever actually had a cup of coffee as good as most of us drink each and every day. There is good fresh coffee and there is stale. Stale comes in varying degrees, but fresh at my house is never 30 to 90 days post roast
I understand that his show must be based on a level that average Joe and Jane will understand, and maybe even adopt. But there is no harm in at least mentioning that good equipment and really fresh coffee take drinking coffee to a whole new level of pleasure. True Gourmet is always worth at least a mention on a food channel show about a specific beverage.
I was disappointed that he completely missed mentioning what it takes to have truly great coffee.

22) From: Tom Gaskell
javafool,
Point taken.
Counterpoint:
Alton Brown maintains a shrine to "King" Louis Pasteur in his TV kitchen.  =
I
don't yet, but that may change.  Of course, I would first need to acquire a
TV kitchen.
We each have our own depths of insanity that we are willing/unwilling to
accept.  Also, that level of (in)sanity is a sliding scale that may move
toward either end of the personal acceptance dipstick at any time for any
reason.
Roasted coffee in my house rarely lasts 7 days from the "born on date."
Coffee stays fresh for 30 to 90 days!!  That's Blasphemy!!!  YMMV.
I fully understand that a high quality motorized burr grinder would improve
my coffee.
I just feel that it wouldn't improve it enough to justify more than $20.
Not yet, but that may change.  YMMV
Some folks seem to feel that a civiet cat is required to produce the best
possible coffee.  I accept that they feel that way, but don't have a civet.
Not yet, but that may change.  I need to check E-Bay.  If there's a Dutch
auction should I get one for you?   ;^)
YMMV.
Cheers, with tongue firmly planted in cheek,  Tom
On 4/26/06, javafool  wrote:
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
ay.
<Snip>
ast
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ee
<Snip>

23) From: Jason Brooks
As for eBay, this might not quite do, but it's a start:http://tinyurl.com/qy4kvJason :-)
<Snip>
-- 
Jason Brooks
jbrookshttp://members.kinex.net/~jbrooks/blog/blog.html-----------------------------------------
This email was sent using Kinex WebMail.
   "Webmail for the World!"http://www.kinex.net/

24) From: Tom Gaskell
... but without the coffee production plumbing?
Cheers,  Tom
On 4/27/06, Jason Brooks  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Justin Marquez
On 4/27/06, Jason Brooks  wrote:
<Snip>
 Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

26) From: javafool
Tom,
All very good points. The giant step in good coffee begins with fresh roasted coffee (ie: home roasting) which can be accomplished quite adequately with as little as a garage sale hot air popcorn popper. From there the improvement are made in somewhat smaller steps.
Top quality green coffee, such as Tom & Maria sell, is another step in coffee improvement. Proper brewing temperature, as Tom so aptly explained in the latest Tiny Joy, is required for proper extraction. Then there is brew time, water quality, proper grind, equipment cleanliness, and the other details that take that fresh roasted coffee and make it a little better, step by step.
I think being here, sharing, learning, trying new things all add to what makes each persons coffee experience the best that it can be for them, and maybe a few close friends around them.
Terry
Oh yes, I'll take that civet, but only if there are two. You, of course, get the first one :)
FROM: javafool,
Point taken.
Counterpoint:
Alton Brown maintains a shrine to "King" Louis Pasteur in his TV kitchen.  =
I
don't yet, but that may change.  Of course, I would first need to acquire a
TV kitchen.
We each have our own depths of insanity that we are willing/unwilling to
accept.  Also, that level of (in)sanity is a sliding scale that may move
toward either end of the personal acceptance dipstick at any time for any
reason.
Roasted coffee in my house rarely lasts 7 days from the "born on date."
Coffee stays fresh for 30 to 90 days!!  That's Blasphemy!!!  YMMV.
I fully understand that a high quality motorized burr grinder would improve
my coffee.
I just feel that it wouldn't improve it enough to justify more than $20.
Not yet, but that may change.  YMMV
Some folks seem to feel that a civiet cat is required to produce the best
possible coffee.  I accept that they feel that way, but don't have a civet.
Not yet, but that may change.  I need to check E-Bay.  If there's a Dutch
auction should I get one for you?   ;^)
YMMV.
Cheers, with tongue firmly planted in cheek,  Tom

27) From: raymanowen
"...burr grinder would improve my coffee [but] wouldn't improve it enough t=
o
justify more than $20"
The very same thing is true of *$ coffee, so they shed all their good
equipment... -ro

28) From: John Blumel
On Apr 26, 2006, at 6:12 pm, javafool wrote:
<Snip>
I'm beginning to think that AB didn't actually appear on this episode  
of Good Eats but that it was, in fact, BA giving out this coffee  
disinformation.
John Blumel

29) From: Tom Gaskell
John,
You, sir, are a GE weenie.
Me too.  =8^)
Cheers,  Tom
On 4/28/06, John Blumel  wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Wendy Sarrett
I have to admit I like Alton and enjoy his show but like most 
professional chefs, he's NOT a coffee person.  Actually, the funniest 
thing is seeing Ina Gartner (Barefoot Contessa) demonstrate making 
coffee.   She used (gag me with a spoon!) pre-ground!!! EEEK!!
Wendy
javafool wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: chris schepers
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Don Cummings wrote:
<Snip>
He does have a good grinder, in fact.  According to his "official" Food 
Network kitchen tour, he has a KitchenAid Proline.. along with the 
espresso machine & drip brewer..http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/lf_kitchen_design/text/0,,FOOD_18376_29784,00.htmlI don't mind that he recommends using a whirly grinder.  There's no way 
he could convince the average person to plunk down $100 on a grinder to 
go with a $5 pourover cone.  We coffee nerds understand the logic 
here... but coffee nerds are, well, uh, special.
No, I don't store my cupping spoon in my pocket protector...
Chris Schepers

32) From: Wendy Sarrett
Thanks for the correction Chris....I had no idea!
Wendy
chris schepers wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: Don Cummings
I appreciate the info. I would of won big bucks (I had said that I would be=
t
big bucks that he had a nice burr grinder somewhere in that kitchen.)
I almost bought one of those today. I'm wavering between that and the Bunn
Home unit.
Don
<Snip>
4,00.html
<Snip>

34) From: javafool
Don,
I have a Bunn home unit and it has taken a permanent place on my workbench in the garage. The KitchenAid ProLine grinder has a home on the kitchen counter. Both of those grinders make quite a mess on the counter, but I think the KitchenAid seems to do a much better job of grinding coffee. I much prefer the Solis over the Bunn also, and it makes less mess than the KA or the Bunn.
Terry
Don said: I appreciate the info. I would of won big bucks (I had said that I would bet big bucks that he had a nice burr grinder somewhere in that kitchen.)
I almost bought one of those today. I'm wavering between that and the Bunn Home unit.
Don
<Snip>


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