HomeRoast Digest


Topic: "Caffeinated coffee actually confers some benefits...." (9 msgs / 280 lines)
1) From: Justin Marquez
 More on coffee: Cola, not coffee, raises blood pressure
------------------------------
 By Harvard Health Publications
   
"I love coffee; I love tea; I love the java jive, and it loves me. " Mos=
t
"caf-fiends" can identify with the lighthearted "Java Jive." But many peopl=
e
have serious concerns about caffeinated coffee. One worry is high blood
pressure. We know that a cup of coffee can temporarily boost blood pressure=
,
but does a regular coffee habit cause a chronic condition?
*Caffeinated coffee actually confers some benefits, lowering the risk for
diabetes, colon cancer, gallstones, and Parkinson's disease, and improving
cognitive function and physical endurance*. *A November 2005 study in
the Journal
of the American Medical Association (JAMA) continues the good news 
concluding that there's no link between coffee and hypertension*. But the
news isn't all good. Cola drinkers, listen up.
The *JAMA* study  by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Harva=
rd
School of Public Health  drew on data from the Nurses' Health Study, whi=
ch
has tracked the health and habits of more than 200,000 registered nurses
since 1976. The researchers used food frequency questionnaires and medical
reports to analyze the relationship between caffeine intake and the
development of hypertension over a 12-year period. *They found no link
between coffee drinking (caffeinated or decaffeinated) and hypertension in
women who didn't have the condition at the start of the study.* For tea
drinkers, there was a slightly increased risk only among younger
participants (age 2646 at the start of the study). The truly surprising
results were for cola drinkers.
Women who drank the most colas  four cans or more per day, sugared or di=
et
 increased their risk of high blood pressure by 16%44%. (Sugar-free c=
olas
were somewhat less of a problem, but both elevated risk.) The authors
couldn't explain why colas would have this effect, although they noted such
drinks contain caramel coloring "rich in advanced glycation end products,"
or AGEs.
AGEs are unstable compounds that can result from the cooking, heating, or
oxidation of carbohydrates. They've been linked to several chronic
conditions, and some research suggests they may play a role in hypertension=
.
But the authors of the *JAMA* study caution that it's too early to make any
recommendations about cola-drinking and hypertension

2) From: Aaron
Im not suprised,  cola's have all that sugar and all kinds of carbonated 
chemical caca in them.  Even the CO2 to make it bubble, when you think 
about it, is a waste product our body normally expels.  When ones CO2 
level goes up in the blood, the heart pumps a bit faster trying to get 
the co2 out via the lungs and o2 levels back to normal.... hence the 
possible hypertensive affects.
When someone suffocates, (like being stuck in a closed container for 
example... ie kids in a refridgerator as an example) besides mafia style 
with a bag around the head, many times they end up dying of a heart 
attack because the heart rate increases so fast due to the co2 levels in 
the blood being so high that it just finally explodes or gives out.
You go eating or drinking garbage, you are going to end up with 
consequences from it.
Aaron

3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
You know, I am tepid on all the pro-caffeine studies. I guess I just 
don't trust  this stuff - BUT I think that the caffeine scares (well, 
going back to the late 1800s-early 20th Century, sponsored greatly by 
Postum ... and most recently I think the mid-70s had a lot of horror 
studies) overstate the case, as well as the recent barrage of 
pro-caffeine research, some blatantly industry sponsored (although 
this seems not to be...).
Fact is, drink 24 cups of coffee a day*, you will have problems. Be 
moderate, listen to your body, you should be okay. Dumb common sense, 
maybe I trust it more than I should ...
Tom
* that was the equivalent dosage the rats received in the 70s study.
By Harvard Health Publications
"I love coffee; I love tea; I love the java jive, and it loves me. " 
Most "caf-fiends" can identify with the lighthearted "Java Jive." But 
many people have serious concerns about caffeinated coffee. One worry 
is high blood pressure. We know that a cup of coffee can temporarily 
boost blood pressure, but does a regular coffee habit cause a chronic 
condition?
Caffeinated coffee actually confers some benefits, lowering the risk 
for diabetes, colon cancer, gallstones, and Parkinson's disease, and 
improving cognitive function and physical endurance . A November 2005 
study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) 
continues the good news - concluding that there's no link between 
coffee and hypertension. But the news isn't all good. Cola drinkers, 
listen up.
The JAMA study - by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the 
Harvard School of Public Health - drew on data from the Nurses' 
Health Study, which has tracked the health and habits of more than 
200,000 registered nurses since 1976. The researchers used food 
frequency questionnaires and medical reports to analyze the 
relationship between caffeine intake and the development of 
hypertension over a 12-year period. They found no link between coffee 
drinking (caffeinated or decaffeinated) and hypertension in women who 
didn't have the condition at the start of the study. For tea 
drinkers, there was a slightly increased risk only among younger 
participants (age 26-46 at the start of the study). The truly 
surprising results were for cola drinkers.
Women who drank the most colas - four cans or more per day, sugared 
or diet - increased their risk of high blood pressure by 16%-44%. 
(Sugar-free colas were somewhat less of a problem, but both elevated 
risk.) The authors couldn't explain why colas would have this effect, 
although they noted such drinks contain caramel coloring "rich in 
advanced glycation end products," or AGEs.
AGEs are unstable compounds that can result from the cooking, 
heating, or oxidation of carbohydrates. They've been linked to 
several chronic conditions, and some research suggests they may play 
a role in hypertension. But the authors of the JAMA study caution 
that it's too early to make any recommendations about cola-drinking 
and hypertension
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

4) From: raymanowen
"Fact is, drink 24 cups of coffee a day*, you will have problems."
The least of which would be finding me. You know where I'd be... ro
Feasibility Studies- can't live without 'em-
On 4/20/06, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 

5) From: Aaron Peterson
On 4/20/06, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
<Snip>
My only question:
Is that measuring cups, 5oz cups or big fat travel mugs full of
coffee?  I like the big fat travel mugs :-)
Aaron Peterson
Versailles, KY

6) From:
  Well said,,,,,,, everthing in moderation..................
<Snip>

7) From: Richard Hoffbeck
Just for yucks I pulled the study. Most of what you hear reported in the 
press is based on retrospective observational studies which at best are 
highly suspect - they're basically data mining which produces all sorts 
of spurious correlations, that for reasons that still escape me, get 
published.
This particular article came out of the Nurses Health Study which is a 
large prospective cohort study with about 160K participants tracked 
since 1976. It is fairly well respected. They didn't seem to find any 
effect from caffeine either as total consumption or broken out into tea 
or coffee individually. There does seem to be some elevated risk for 
people consuming sugared cola beverages, but ...
The problem with observational studies is that there are all sorts of 
errors involved. As a result we tend to discount small effects, even if 
they're statistically significant. The rule of thumb for observational 
studies (as compared to clinical trials, controlled experiments, etc.) 
is that if the effect is between reducing the risk by 1/2 and less than 
increasing the risk by 2x you want to be careful in interpreting the 
result. The results here tend to be more in the range of plus of minus 
10% and aren't statistically significant. Even the high end of the 
sugared cola group has an increase in risk of 44% but the confidence 
interval runs from a 2% decrease in risk to a 111% increase in risk.
I think 150 years of public health research boils down to don't smoke, 
don't dump your sewage upstream, wear a bicycle helmet and practice 
moderation :-)
--rick
Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Scott Miller
Richard Hoffbeck wrote:
<Snip>
Statistical data is like a woman in a bikini: what's visible is 
interesting; what's covered up is vital.
I'm so glad I decided to not go into research after school. I had the 
inside track with some heavy-hitter type research profs who I worked 
for. The work-study job was fascinating and we produced well received 
work, but the research world was just a bit out of touch with the world 
around me at the time.... I mean, those beaches in south Florida were 
HAPPENNING man!
cheers,
ScoTTT

9) From: Richard Hoffbeck
Hi Scott,
Yeah, nutritional stuff is hard to do right and there is just so much 
junk out there that I ignore most of it.
I just got back into research. I'd spent most of the 90's doing network 
stuff, took a year off, and when I was lining up references one of my 
old bosses from the U asked if I'd like to come back. I said sure.
Its a good group doing quality research. The money isn't great but I'm 
to that age where free time is a lot more useful than money. Last week I 
got to spend two days at a workshop on computational genomics and next 
week is a day long session on using GPS/GIS for public health research. 
Fun stuff.
Now if I can just convince them that a super auto is a piece of lab 
equipment I'll be set :-)
Have a nice day.
--rick
Scott Miller wrote:
<Snip>


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