HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Ibriks (19 msgs / 357 lines)
1) From: Brian Kamnetz
In case anyone else has been waiting, the SM ibriks are now restocked
in all three sizes.
Brian

2) From: James House
Will those work with an electric stove?  I know the SM site "says" they
will, I was hoping to get some feedback from someone using one on an
electric...and what grinder/mill you are using.  I have my eye on the Zass
Turkish as it would take up less space than the 169 DG.
On 4/21/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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3) From: James House
Uh oh..just noticed this on the SM site on the explanation of ibrik use....
"The coffee should be powderized ... that is, the finest grind possible. (I=
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fact, this is ONE thing that those whirling-blade type grinders do fairly
well)."
How would my Mazzer feel if I brought home a wally world blade?  Seriously
though, this would be quite an inexpensive route.  Anyone use the whirly's
for their ibrik?
On 4/21/06, James House  wrote:
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4) From: Brian Kamnetz
James,
I tried quite a while using an ibrik on an electric stove, and had
trouble, until finally the light went on when I read someone's
description and they started talking about what happens at given
temps. So I pulled out the little thermometer I bought from Tom and
Maria a while back, and started watching what happened with it,
controlling temp with both the burner control and by removing the
ibrik, and i started having much better luck. Powder is definitely
good, so if you actually do have a mazzer and don't mind grinding very
fine, that would be the way to go. I use either a Zass 169 (usualy) or
sometimes a Zass grain mill, but with either one, set to grind as
finely as possible.
Brian
On 4/21/06, James House  wrote:
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5) From: James House
Ok sounds good Brian.  I saw some turkish mills on Ebay (want to keep my
mazzer dialed in for my espresso pulls) but I am concerned about their
"quality".  They are substantially cheaper than what SM sells, but they
state that Zass is of much higher quality, so I might just wait and order
the Ibrik and Zass mill together when the mills are back in stock (website
says in April 2006...which is now :).
I think this will be a fun alternative to pulling espresso shots or the fp
basics.  I am also interested in the concept of the ibrik brewing in
general.
Thanks!
james
On 4/21/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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6) From: Angelo
I use a porcelain mortar and pestle (you can get one from a 
laboratory supply company. ) I can grind the coffee to talc in a few seconds...
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7) From: James House
Ohh...very interesting.  I noticed some MP's at Sur La Table just
yesterday....  I might very well do that, one less item to plug in.  Thanks
for that great suggestion!
On 4/22/06, Angelo  wrote:
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8) From:
Sur La has a lot of coffee stuff depending on the area.
Scottsdale stor at Kirland Commons has some fairly good brewing stuff.
g
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9) From: Brian Kamnetz
James,
One final note:
I mentioned that "Powder is definitely good." The reason for that is
as follows. I've found that I like ibrik coffee the best when the
water and sugar have a bit of a head start on the stove (on low heat
while I am measuring the coffee and then grinding), then dump the
coffee powder on top. You will have what looks like a big pile of
coffee powder floating on top of the water. Using the thermometer (I
don't know the exact temps because I don't know where my notes are; I
moved and haven't run across the notes in the unpacking process yet) I
watch the temp creep up past 175 or so, and not too much past this,
but definitely before boiling, which here in SC is around 212, and try
to keep the foaming slow. It will rise maybe a quarter of an inch.
Cool it a little, and repeat.
Here's where I have to work on my technique, when I get organized
enough to try it again. It looks like there is still a big pile of
powder on top of the water, but there isn't; most of the powder has
sunk. I haven't learned where to stop yet, so I have almost always
gone too long trying to get the no-longer-there powder to get wet and
sink.
Good luck. Be patient and keep notes. I love ibrik coffee.
Brian
On 4/21/06, James House  wrote:
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10) From: James House
Thanks for the helpful tips Brian.  This sounds alot like the method I was
reading here: http://www.ineedcoffee.com/04/turkishcoffee/I just ordered a really neat looking old Ibrik today.  Should have it by
next weekend.  My espresso adventure so far has helped me to learn that
patience, practice, and practice and practice...eventually pays off.
I have made my own chai tea using the "real deal" ingredients such as
cardamom, have you spiced up your turkish brews yet?
-james
On 4/22/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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11) From: Angelo
James,
Adding spices is not necessarily the "real deal". I know many people 
who come from countries where this method of brewing is used and when 
I mention adding spices, many are surprised by the suggestion. It all 
boils up to how you enjoy it...Experiment!
A+
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12) From: Brian Kamnetz
For the past month I haven't been able to do much except press pot,
and when I was making Turkish I was trying to get the basics of water,
coffee, sugar and heat down, but I have some Penzey's cardamom and
eventually plan to fiddle around with it. The best Turkish I made so
far was with the remnants of a batch of "Horse" from last year. Almost
tasted like it was spiced somehow.
Brian
On 4/22/06, James House  wrote:
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13) From: Steve Hay
On 4/23/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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I'd bet Blueberry Horse would taste really good in an Ibrik.  Just thinking
how smooth and non-acidic the Horse I have here is, and how the blueberry
really "cools" the flavor down in stronger pots...  I should give this a
try, thanks!
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

14) From: David Schooley
Hi, I'm new here... anyway,
When I first started doing Turkish coffee, I asked a Turkish coworker  
what, if anything, I should add. According to him, the Turkish way is  
no spices and maybe some sugar. Another coworker from Pakistan lets  
me know if I do not add enough cardamom and sugar when I take a batch  
in to work. One of the local Greek restaurants adds sugar and who- 
knows-what spices, and the local Persian place does not add anything.  
I think the Arabs are the biggest proponents of adding cardamom to  
coffee. You may want to increase the sugar just a bit if you add  
cardamom.
I made a batch earlier this week with Harar Horse Lot 19* with no  
additional spices. Had I not known better, I would have sworn the  
coffee had cardamom in it. This got me to thinking. Brewing Ethiopian  
coffee in an ibrik is about as close as it gets to the way it was in  
the beginning. Adding cardamom to non-Ethiopian coffee may have  
originally been an attempt to replicate the original flavors.
If you have an appropriate ethnic grocery store nearby, you should be  
able to get unbleached cardamom pods for much less than what the  
bleached ones cost in the grocery store.
* I am new at the home-roasting thing, and it is a bit hard for me to  
tell with Harar, but I think the roast was somewhere between a City+  
and Full City.
On Apr 23, 2006, at 3:32 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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15) From: Tara Kollas
 One of the local Greek restaurants adds sugar and who-
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Having married into a Greek family, I just have to say, I hope you don't
order Turkish coffee at the Greek restaurant...  :)

16) From: Tara Kollas
BTW - have you ever ordered it without sugar?  I prefer it that way,
although I usually confuse the waiter.
On 4/25/06, Tara Kollas  wrote:
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17) From: James House
LOL thanks for the tip Tara!  :)
On 4/25/06, Tara Kollas  wrote:
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18) From: David Schooley
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The first time in a restaurant I order it as it normally comes, just  
to see what the waiter will bring out. I have not been back to this  
particular place (Costa's in Chicago), and next time, which should be  
in a month or so, I will have them cut back on the sugar.
The best cup of Turkish I have ever had was in Dallas at a little  
Mediterranean style restaurant. It was spiced with something unknown  
(to me) and perfectly sweetened. I occasionally try to duplicate it,  
and I hope I will get lucky and find it by chance in a restaurant  
someday. (For those familiar with Dallas, it was within walking  
distance of TXU/Energy Plaza. It was a small restaurant clustered  
with five or six others in some sort of plaza. You could eat outside.)
Calling it Turkish in a Greek restaurant would be really bad.
On Apr 25, 2006, at 8:25 PM, Tara Kollas wrote:
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The first time in a =
restaurant I order it as it normally comes, just to see what the waiter =
will bring out. I have not been back to this particular place (Costa's =
in Chicago), and next time, which should be in a month or so, I will =
have them cut back on the sugar. 
The best cup of Turkish I = have ever had was in Dallas at a little Mediterranean style restaurant. = It was spiced with something unknown (to me) and perfectly sweetened. I = occasionally try to duplicate it, and I hope I will get lucky and find = it by chance in a restaurant someday. (For those familiar with Dallas, = it was within walking distance of TXU/Energy Plaza. It was a small = restaurant clustered with five or six others in some sort of plaza. You = could eat outside.)
Calling it Turkish in a = Greek restaurant would be really bad.
On Apr 25, 2006, = at 8:25 PM, Tara Kollas wrote:
BTW - have = you ever ordered it without sugar?  I prefer it that way, although I = usually confuse the waiter. On = 4/25/06, Tara Kollas <tara.kollas> = wrote: One of the local Greek restaurants adds sugar and = who- knows-what spices   Having married into a Greek family, I = just have to say, I hope you don't order Turkish coffee at the Greek = restaurant...  = :)   <= /BODY>= --Apple-Mail-3-210008229--

19) From: James House
Hmm...I am Houston, and I make it up to Dallas (or through Dallas on my way
to Oklahoma) once in awhile.  I will try to remember this...
-james
On 4/25/06, David Schooley  wrote:
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