HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Gene v. HotTop v. Next Generation? (3 msgs / 101 lines)
1) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Thoughts?  I'm a slow adopter:  So slow that I haven't adopted anything
since my dog's bowl.  But I'm always tempted by shiny machines.  The HotTop
has beckoned since even before its current iteration, but the Gene's
"on-the-fly" controls, quiet, visibility of beans, lower price, seem to mak=
e
it a more compelling choice.  Only its slow cool seems to be a deficit - -
-one that can be dealt with by dumping the (smallish) 8oz batch.  So what a=
m
I missing?  Why consider the HT?
Considering the Gene's current specs, what engineering challenges are there
to get an under $1,000 (double the Gene's price), 12 oz, roaster?  One that
cools and vents well and is robust enough for years of home use and
"non-technical" consumer maintainance and repair?  Could be that that is th=
e
machine it would get me to "move up."
--
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

2) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Good questions Martin:
Thoughts?  I'm a slow adopter:  So slow that I haven't adopted 
anything since my dog's bowl.  But I'm always tempted by shiny 
machines.  The HotTop has beckoned since even before its current 
iteration, but the Gene's "on-the-fly" controls, quiet, visibility of 
beans, lower price, seem to make it a more compelling choice.  Only 
its slow cool seems to be a deficit - - -one that can be dealt with 
by dumping the (smallish) 8oz batch.  So what am I missing?  Why 
consider the HT?
Slow cool is the weakness here, and also be advised that you can't 
dump the batch out of the roaster until it reaches a set temperature, 
which is 140 f. The Gene does not cool a set amount of time, adopted 
early. As it is, I leave tomorrow on a long sourcing/cupping trip and 
am not sure what my email access will be like. (I am trying to set up 
my cell phone to use as a modem with my laptop, but man, it is tough 
to get it working!) In amy case, we continue to use the Gene daily 
and are very happy to it. Perhaps one thing is that people need to 
learn to anticipate the final degree of roast since this roaster 
(well, all drum roasters, but especially the Gene) tend to continue 
"coasting" even after the cooling kicks in. So you need to stop the 
roast a bit shy of where you want the degree of roast to end up. It 
is not hard, since the Gene gives you such great visibility.
Considering the Gene's current specs, what engineering challenges are 
there to get an under $1,000 (double the Gene's price), 12 oz, 
roaster?  One that cools and vents well and is robust enough for 
years of home use and "non-technical" consumer maintainance and 
repair?  Could be that that is the machine it would get me to "move 
up."
Well, in an electric roaster, don't hold your breath. You would need 
to step up to 220 and need a serious exhaust system. What you end up 
with is a weak machine that can barely roast the batch, probably in a 
very long time ... that is, a coffee baker, not a coffee roaster. I 
have continued to look for a really sturdy propane roaster with a 
solid drum. As you may know, I had brought some in from Brazil, and 
jsut found the dealing with the Brasilian company to be too much of a 
strain.
Tom
--
Martin
Heat + Beans
     all the rest is commentary
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

3) From: Justin Marquez
On 4/24/06, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary <
heatgunroast> wrote:
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I think for a grand, it oughta do a 1-pound batch. Most of the $$ is in
stuff other than size-related items.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)


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