HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Info From Hearthware Re: iRoast2 Roast Profiles (17 msgs / 998 lines)
1) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
All iRoast2 Owners:
I'm  relatively new on the list so if this has been posted before, I =
apologize.  I contacted Hearthware to see about getting my Precision =
repaired (they don't) and they offered to sell me an iRoast2 for a =
discount.  When I replied that I already had one that I was not happy =
with, I received a nice offer from Gene in customer service to assist me =
in tweaking up a custom profile.  After some dialog, he sent me this =
information.
Note the comment about 1st stage!  This would explain a lot of =
complaints I have heard on list and my own experience with the machine =
failing utterly to maintain a low programmed temperature during 1st =
stage.
Gene seems to talk the right talk, and I am appreciative of his =
willingness to help.  These times still seem like they would produce =
Charbucks type coffee to me, but I'll give his suggestions a try.  I'm =
also curious about his definition of "full city".
Michael Wade
Begin quote:
Just say the word, I will help you tweak your profiles.  All my roast =
are in the 12:00 to 13:00 minute range to about full city or just beyond =
depending on the bean.  I always program - never use the presets.  My =
favorite profile for a Guat (SHB or harder) at about 65F is:
1st Stage:    400F    5 min    (the roaster is default programmed to =
blow hard to dry out the beans for the first 3 minutes or until 360F) 
2nd Stage:    435F    2 min    (it will go into first crack within 30 =
seconds to 1 minute)
3rd Stage:    415F    1:15 min    (the first crack will end by end of =
this stage)
4th Stage:    355F    3 min    (the temp is high enough to build body =
without stalling for an even roast but not hot enough to push into 2nd =
crack) 
5th Stage:    410F    1:15 min    (you may start see oils at this stage =
or at end of 3rd - if at end of 3rd, you need to ramp down temp on =
stages 1, 2, and 3. when you see your sweetspot, press cool)
If you are roasting at 70F, you might want to drop the roast temps a =
smidge.  This produces a very smooth, balanced coffee with the right =
amount of acidity, body, and mouthfeel.  It is an office favorite.  =
Thanks.

2) From: Woody DeCasere
12  1/2 minutes at that heat would seem way too high to me, i would think i=
t
would char the beans.
I'll have to try it and see, but i am skeptical.
On 4/27/06, Michael Wade  wrote:
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--
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

3) From: Coffee Kid
The roast I now use exclusively
   
  french press coffee - 350' - 4:30 min., 400' - 5:00 min (I almost always stop it before roast completes.)
   
  Espresso - 350 - 4:30, 400 - 4:30, 440 - 2:00 (half the time I stop it before it hits the third stage, nice Vienna)
   
  I bet the roast Gene suggests will hit 2nd crack during stage 2
   
  Cheers,  Tom
  
Michael Wade  wrote:
          All iRoast2 Owners:
   
  I'm  relatively new on the list so if this has been posted before, I apologize.  I contacted Hearthware to see about getting my Precision repaired (they don't) and they offered to sell me an iRoast2 for a discount.  When I replied that I already had one that I was not happy with, I received a nice offer from Gene in customer service to assist me in tweaking up a custom profile.  After some dialog, he sent me this information.
   
  Note the comment about 1st stage!  This would explain a lot of complaints I have heard on list and my own experience with the machine failing utterly to maintain a low programmed temperature during 1st stage.
   
  Gene seems to talk the right talk, and I am appreciative of his willingness to help.  These times still seem like they would produce Charbucks type coffee to me, but I'll give his suggestions a try.  I'm also curious about his definition of "full city".
   
  Michael Wade
   
  Begin quote:
    Just say the word, I will help you tweak your profiles.  All my roast are in the 12:00 to 13:00 minute range to about full city or just beyond depending on the bean.  I always program - never use the presets.  My favorite profile for a Guat (SHB or harder) at about 65F is:
   
  1st Stage:    400F    5 min    (the roaster is default programmed to blow hard to dry out the beans for the first 3 minutes or until 360F) 
  2nd Stage:    435F    2 min    (it will go into first crack within 30 seconds to 1 minute)
  3rd Stage:    415F    1:15 min    (the first crack will end by end of this stage)
  4th Stage:    355F    3 min    (the temp is high enough to build body without stalling for an even roast but not hot enough to push into 2nd crack) 
  5th Stage:    410F    1:15 min    (you may start see oils at this stage or at end of 3rd - if at end of 3rd, you need to ramp down temp on stages 1, 2, and 3. when you see your sweetspot, press cool)
   
  If you are roasting at 70F, you might want to drop the roast temps a smidge.  This produces a very smooth, balanced coffee with the right amount of acidity, body, and mouthfeel.  It is an office favorite.  Thanks.
---------------------------------
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4) From: Wendy Sarrett
Thanks for posting this info!  I just broke down today and ordered one 
of these puppies.   I'm very much looking forward to giving it a shot! 
(It should come right about when my Brazillian COE  should arrive from SM.)
Wendy

5) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Woody, I'm skeptical too, the main reason I posted this is that it seems =
to explain why the roaster goes right up to 360 no matter what you =
program for the first stage.  
I've also been confused by Tom's tip sheet saying that I should expect =
indicated temperatures to lag 50 degrees below programmed temp, while my =
machine maintains inidcated temps 5-6 degrees *above* the programmed =
point as long as it's above 350 - 360 or so.  
The prevailing opinion seems to be that the chaff collector is to blame =
for all the "too dark, too fast" problems.   I grant that it is =
ridiculously small, and any fines that escape the main screen tend to =
plug the fine-mesh outlet screen, but I just don't see that as the whole =
enchilada.  I really would like to see if I can graft the chaff =
collector from my Precision onto the iRoast, but that's another =
project...
Finding out about this undocumented temperature override (assuming it =
really exists) explains a bit, but it will take a lot more roasting to =
see if I can manage to stretch the gap between 1st and 2nd once I get =
this freq converter assembled so I can hear the darn snaps (I hope).
I'm going to try to thread my thermocouple into the bottom of the roast =
chamber as someone else has suggested and see if I can pick up some =
additional information there. 
Michael Wade

6) From: Michael Wade
Wendy, keep your finger on the cool button...
I moved up to the iRoast expecting to get longer roasts than my Precision, 
but they're only a minute or so longer and I can't hear the cracks (my 
problem, not the machine's)   The most frequently mentioned problem seems to 
be "too dark, too fast".
If you try Gene's profile, let us know how it turns out!
Michael Wade

7) From: Coffee Kid
Michael,
   
  There are 3 temps to work with.  Programmed temp, internal (on-board) temp, and bean mass temp (if you have a probe).  The iroast has an override that sets the temp for the 1st 3 minutes at 350' programmed (which is what Gene told me as well), which comes out to about 280'-320' on-board (depending on room temp.).  350' programmed temp is the coolest the iroast can be set.  Which, I assume, is the iroast folks saying "hey stupid, don't roast to hot early on, because this machine roasts hot and fast as it is." 
   
  I typically hit 2nd crack after 6-7 minutes when the on-board temp hits 335' - 340'  (Which is what i get at the 400' programmed temp.)  Gene's suggested roast, and, really any other that goes for 12 - 13 minutes is compost (unless charcoal flavor is the desired result.)  Oily beans in my book is bad.
   
  For those that are new to Iroast.  I find that when I hear the first bean/s enter into 2nd crack I am at C+.  It seems there are always a few beans that are ahead of the rest and give warning of whats to come.  It may take 30-60 seconds for the rest of the beans to get to the same point (catch up).  After that 30-60 seconds you are in FC/FC+ territory.
   
  Try the profile I suggested in my other email.  I think it will work well for you.  Try not to depend too much on the temps and focus on the sound and smell.  Tom said once that the ground beans are a better indicator of roast color rather than their surface color.  Which i take as - don't focus to much on surface color while roasting.  The Africans, especially the dry-processed, while darken on the outside quickly.  When you grind you get a much lighter color.  I under-roasted a few batches before this became clear.  But then again, one persons under-roasted is another persons perfect roast to taste varietal flavors.
   
  I have some other tips, but I have a final exam at 12:30 today.  If you have any questions on standard deviation or standard error of measurement I can also help with that (If you are developing tests for 2nd Graders).  
   
  Cheers,
   
  Tom "four more weeks till summer vacation" Coffee Kid
   
Michael Wade  wrote:
          Woody, I'm skeptical too, the main reason I posted this is that it seems to explain why the roaster goes right up to 360 no matter what you program for the first stage.  
   
  I've also been confused by Tom's tip sheet saying that I should expect indicated temperatures to lag 50 degrees below programmed temp, while my machine maintains inidcated temps 5-6 degrees *above* the programmed point as long as it's above 350 - 360 or so.  
   
  The prevailing opinion seems to be that the chaff collector is to blame for all the "too dark, too fast" problems.   I grant that it is ridiculously small, and any fines that escape the main screen tend to plug the fine-mesh outlet screen, but I just don't see that as the whole enchilada.  I really would like to see if I can graft the chaff collector from my Precision onto the iRoast, but that's another project...
   
  Finding out about this undocumented temperature override (assuming it really exists) explains a bit, but it will take a lot more roasting to see if I can manage to stretch the gap between 1st and 2nd once I get this freq converter assembled so I can hear the darn snaps (I hope).
   
  I'm going to try to thread my thermocouple into the bottom of the roast chamber as someone else has suggested and see if I can pick up some additional information there. 
   
  Michael Wade

8) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Tom:
I'm looking over my roast logs and finding that with this program:
2:00 @ 320, (which the machine ignores and uses 360) 3:00 @370, 5:00 @ =
450; I hit 1st crack at about 6:00, 430 indicated.  I can hear a few =
pops, but not well enough to tell when 1st is over, and I can't hear 2nd =
at all (or I've never hit it, which I find hard to believe from the =
taste of several batches)
So I'm confused that you are seeing 2nd crack at 335 - 340 indicated, =
when I'm seeing 1st at 430 indicated.  (unless I'm missing 1st and =
hearing 2nd???)
Since the machine, for cost reasons, has only one temperature sensor =
that measures the inlet air temperature post-heating coil, indicated =
temp is derived somehow from that.  I measured the inlet airstream =
temperature up to the limits of the insulation on my thermocouple (500 =
F) and found that the indicated temp runs about 75 degrees F lower than =
inlet air temp.  I assume this is a correction factor introduced to =
simulate what?  Bean temp?  Chamber temp?  I wonder if the correction =
factor is uniform from machine to machine?
The pre-programmed  "drying" stage irritates me, but as I've watched the =
time/temp (measured at the chaff collector so far) during roasts it is =
not an unreasonable curve.  From culling through hundreds of messages on =
list I've come to understand that anything from 5 to 22 minutes til 1st =
crack is OK as long as you don't stall it, but the "brass ring" seems to =
be to learn to stretch the time between 1st and 2nd crack. (as Gene =
alludes to in his recommendations)  And that in a nutshell (a coffee =
cherry?)  is what I'm looking for.
I agree about oily beans, I also agree about keeping it simple and =
relying on sound and smell, but unfortunately both of those senses are =
diminished for me.  I'm building an ultrasonic freq converter to =
hopefully hear the cracks but don't have a clue about an olfactory =
amplifier...  (Considering the quirks and fascinations of the hunting =
hounds I've known I'd just as soon not go there.)
So I'm left with flying on instruments while attempting something like =
Gene's stage 4 advice.  I'll probably try something like: 4.30 @350', =
1:00 @ 435', 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335 and see what happens.
Michael Wade

9) From: Coffee Kid
I'm looking over my roast logs and finding that with this program:
  2:00 @ 320, (which the machine ignores and uses 360) 3:00 @370, 5:00 @ 450; I hit 1st crack at about 6:00, 430 indicated.  I can hear a few pops, but not well enough to tell when 1st is over, and I can't hear 2nd at all (or I've never hit it, which I find hard to believe from the taste of several batches)
   
  I never hear first crack.  Others say they hear it great.  2nd crack is fairly audible for me.  It may be 2nd, like you mentioned, that you are hearing.
   
  You are hearing what you think is 1st crack at the 6:00 mark.  That is usually where I hear 2nd crack (at about 6 or 7 minutes).
   
  You are able to program a temp. below 350'?  My machine gives the option to program 350'-485'.  Perhaps Hearthware is monkeying with the machines as they go along?
   
  I also found that a range of temp settings gave the same results.  I can't find my notes right now, but, it was something like:  350'-385' = same output, 390-435 = same output, 440 and up to ?= same.  When I first got the iroast i did many 5 stage roasts and found that in some cases there was no change in fan speed and heating element output.  I didn't do thorough experimentation, but loosely figured this out.  I just hit my 250th roast and I now basically use one roast profile.
   
  350' for 4-5 min.,  400' for 4-5 min.  I get great results, taste the blueberries, and have a nice smooth ride through 2nd crack if that is where I am headed.
   
  Let me know how the sonic enhancer works out.  I did a number on my ears by playing guitar amps at 11 for too many years. -Tom
   
---------------------------------
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10) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Tom:
Just finished 3 roasts.  I tried the roast I mentioned: 4.30 @350', 1:00 =
@ 435', 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335  but the 2nd stage was too short, 1st =
crack stalled and I fiddled around trying to save the batch so have no =
accurate notes, but wound up with bright cinnamon coffee.  I may try it =
tomorrow just to see what its like.
Batch 2, I changed the profile to: 4.30 @350', 2:00 @ 435' (more time =
for 1st to start), 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335, 1:00 @ 415 (just in case I =
want to try for 2nd)
Using this profile, I roasted the Java decaf again and it finished 1st =
crack (I think), never seemed to go into 2nd even though I let it run =
out the program.
Batch 3, same profile as 2, Ethiopian Harar decaf, went into 1st soon =
after the start of 2nd stage but didn't seem to run on into 2nd (as well =
as I can tell)  I stopped it just before stage 5 to try to preserve the =
floral notes (what I think of as "Prince Albert", to tell the truth)  
Couldn't resist brewing FP samples of both 2 & 3.  Big soft body, =
underdeveloped, but without the harsh edges would expect. Tastes like =
what I think of as Full City, but if you put my entire body of coffee =
cupping knowledge in your left eye you'd feel no discomfort whatsoever.  =
I'd drink this any day just as it is.  Can't wait until tomorrow =
afternoon!
I'm pretty excited because this is the first hint of success I've had at =
stretching a roast out to build body without winding up with oily =
charcoal.  Between your suggestion for first stage and Gene's suggestion =
for 4th, I feel like I've made a breakthrough and have something solid =
to build on.  THANK YOU!
Odd about the 1st and second crack thing...  I wonder which of us is =
hearing what?  I'm on about my 280th roast or so, having worn out a =
Precision before I bought the iR2.  The crack I'm hearing at 6:00 sounds =
like the 1st crack I'm used to from the Precision, loud pops, rather =
than the "rice crispies" of second, but I can't really tell over the =
higher fan noise.  I'll let you know how the detector works out.
Yes, the iR2, at least mine, has a program temp range down to 320 =
degrees F, though the machine will never use it unless you program a =
later stage to go back down that low after 3:00 minutes or 360 degrees, =
according to Gene.
I have seen some unexplainable surges in temperature, when I was =
programming 3rd stage at 440, the machine would go up to 430, hold there =
for a minute or so, then surge on up to 450.  
As I look over the logs from today I see that the long first stage would =
flatten out at 350 - 352 (indicated) and hold there at about 3:00 on the =
first batch of the day, and at about 2:00 on subsequent batches, while =
chaff collector temp would continue to rise at about 10-20 deg/min.  
Second stage, programmed to 435, would level off at 395-397 indicated =
and hold there, though chaff collector temp would continue to climb.  =
Since the air inlet temp is about 75 degrees higher than indicated temp, =
the rise makes sense, but no idea why a program of 435 would hold at =
395.
Third stage (410 programmed) holds at 395-397  indicated, then 4th stage =
(335 programmed) drops to 350-352 indicated and holds there like a =
leech.
So while the machine seems pretty temperature-agile, it doesn't follow =
the programming very closely.  Whether this is more undocumented =
Microsoft-type foolishness ("That's not a bug, it's a feature!") or just =
clunkiness is probably moot.  It (finally!) seems that for the price =
point we've got a pretty usable machine, albeit with a fair amount of =
"personality".
Hm, just noted the length of this post...  That coffee SAID it was =
decaf...
Michael Wade

11) From: Larry English
Guess I'll try adding to the information glut on iRoast2 profiles.  The 350=
F
override does appear to be correct - if I program 1st stage for 400F more
than 3 minutes, the fan drops speed at the 3 minute mark.  I have a TC
positioned midway between center column and outside of the chamber, about
1/2" above metal bottom, and TC temp reaches 350F right about the 3 minute
mark as well, increasing slowly to that point over the 3rd minute.
Here's a profile that works pretty well for me when I want a 12-13 minute
roast:
  350F 5:00, 400F 4:00, 450F 6:00 and of course hit Cool when ripe.
Another one that gives quicker roasts, and is useful for beans that need a
little hotter temps:
  400F 6:00, 440F 4:00, 470F 5:00 etc.  Again, the 1st 3 minutes are
actually at 350F, no need to program that in.
My other profiles are also of the increasing-temp-over-time variety, rather
than the cool-hot-warm type that Gene and Hearthware seem to prefer.   I ge=
t
nice even roasts in most cases, blends and Yemen being recent exceptions.
I'm pretty happy with my upgrade from FreshRoast, but I still use the littl=
e
beast from time to time.
Larry
On 4/29/06, Michael Wade  wrote:
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12) From: Coffee Kid
Michael,
   
  It definately seems Hearthware is "modifying" the IR2 on the fly.  I guess as long as you get to the finish line you're in good shape.  Unfortunately, it makes it hard to compare notes along the way. -Tom
Michael Wade  wrote:
          Tom:
   
  Just finished 3 roasts.  I tried the roast I mentioned: 4.30 @350', 1:00 @ 435', 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335  but the 2nd stage was too short, 1st crack stalled and I fiddled around trying to save the batch so have no accurate notes, but wound up with bright cinnamon coffee.  I may try it tomorrow just to see what its like.
   
  Batch 2, I changed the profile to: 4.30 @350', 2:00 @ 435' (more time for 1st to start), 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335, 1:00 @ 415 (just in case I want to try for 2nd)
   
  Using this profile, I roasted the Java decaf again and it finished 1st crack (I think), never seemed to go into 2nd even though I let it run out the program.
   
  Batch 3, same profile as 2, Ethiopian Harar decaf, went into 1st soon after the start of 2nd stage but didn't seem to run on into 2nd (as well as I can tell)  I stopped it just before stage 5 to try to preserve the floral notes (what I think of as "Prince Albert", to tell the truth)  
   
  Couldn't resist brewing FP samples of both 2 & 3.  Big soft body, underdeveloped, but without the harsh edges would expect. Tastes like what I think of as Full City, but if you put my entire body of coffee cupping knowledge in your left eye you'd feel no discomfort whatsoever.  I'd drink this any day just as it is.  Can't wait until tomorrow afternoon!
   
  I'm pretty excited because this is the first hint of success I've had at stretching a roast out to build body without winding up with oily charcoal.  Between your suggestion for first stage and Gene's suggestion for 4th, I feel like I've made a breakthrough and have something solid to build on.  THANK YOU!
   
  Odd about the 1st and second crack thing...  I wonder which of us is hearing what?  I'm on about my 280th roast or so, having worn out a Precision before I bought the iR2.  The crack I'm hearing at 6:00 sounds like the 1st crack I'm used to from the Precision, loud pops, rather than the "rice crispies" of second, but I can't really tell over the higher fan noise.  I'll let you know how the detector works out.
   
  Yes, the iR2, at least mine, has a program temp range down to 320 degrees F, though the machine will never use it unless you program a later stage to go back down that low after 3:00 minutes or 360 degrees, according to Gene.
   
  I have seen some unexplainable surges in temperature, when I was programming 3rd stage at 440, the machine would go up to 430, hold there for a minute or so, then surge on up to 450.  
   
  As I look over the logs from today I see that the long first stage would flatten out at 350 - 352 (indicated) and hold there at about 3:00 on the first batch of the day, and at about 2:00 on subsequent batches, while chaff collector temp would continue to rise at about 10-20 deg/min.  
   
  Second stage, programmed to 435, would level off at 395-397 indicated and hold there, though chaff collector temp would continue to climb.  Since the air inlet temp is about 75 degrees higher than indicated temp, the rise makes sense, but no idea why a program of 435 would hold at 395.
   
  Third stage (410 programmed) holds at 395-397  indicated, then 4th stage (335 programmed) drops to 350-352 indicated and holds there like a leech.
   
  So while the machine seems pretty temperature-agile, it doesn't follow the programming very closely.  Whether this is more undocumented Microsoft-type foolishness ("That's not a bug, it's a feature!") or just clunkiness is probably moot.  It (finally!) seems that for the price point we've got a pretty usable machine, albeit with a fair amount of "personality".
   
  Hm, just noted the length of this post...  That coffee SAID it was decaf...
   
  Michael Wade

13) From: Coffee Kid
Michael,
   
  I am finding out yet again that the more you know, your realize how much you don't know.  I guess what I thought was 2nd crack was first and the roast was probably going straight from 1st into 2nd or they were combining.  So, now comes the quest to slow down the roast without stalling.  $%&!#   I thought I had it all figured out.  Just finished 5 roasts using modified versions of what your are trying.  But, using different beans means different amount of chaff which changes the temps.  I definitely see a drum in my future.  The Redneck Roaster is on my mind today.  Keep us posted if you find a profile that works for you.
   
  Tom 
Michael Wade  wrote:
          Tom:
   
  Just finished 3 roasts.  I tried the roast I mentioned: 4.30 @350', 1:00 @ 435', 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335  but the 2nd stage was too short, 1st crack stalled and I fiddled around trying to save the batch so have no accurate notes, but wound up with bright cinnamon coffee.  I may try it tomorrow just to see what its like.
   
  Batch 2, I changed the profile to: 4.30 @350', 2:00 @ 435' (more time for 1st to start), 1:00 @ 415', 2:00 @335, 1:00 @ 415 (just in case I want to try for 2nd)
   
  Using this profile, I roasted the Java decaf again and it finished 1st crack (I think), never seemed to go into 2nd even though I let it run out the program.
   
  Batch 3, same profile as 2, Ethiopian Harar decaf, went into 1st soon after the start of 2nd stage but didn't seem to run on into 2nd (as well as I can tell)  I stopped it just before stage 5 to try to preserve the floral notes (what I think of as "Prince Albert", to tell the truth)  
   
  Couldn't resist brewing FP samples of both 2 & 3.  Big soft body, underdeveloped, but without the harsh edges would expect. Tastes like what I think of as Full City, but if you put my entire body of coffee cupping knowledge in your left eye you'd feel no discomfort whatsoever.  I'd drink this any day just as it is.  Can't wait until tomorrow afternoon!
   
  I'm pretty excited because this is the first hint of success I've had at stretching a roast out to build body without winding up with oily charcoal.  Between your suggestion for first stage and Gene's suggestion for 4th, I feel like I've made a breakthrough and have something solid to build on.  THANK YOU!
   
  Odd about the 1st and second crack thing...  I wonder which of us is hearing what?  I'm on about my 280th roast or so, having worn out a Precision before I bought the iR2.  The crack I'm hearing at 6:00 sounds like the 1st crack I'm used to from the Precision, loud pops, rather than the "rice crispies" of second, but I can't really tell over the higher fan noise.  I'll let you know how the detector works out.
   
  Yes, the iR2, at least mine, has a program temp range down to 320 degrees F, though the machine will never use it unless you program a later stage to go back down that low after 3:00 minutes or 360 degrees, according to Gene.
   
  I have seen some unexplainable surges in temperature, when I was programming 3rd stage at 440, the machine would go up to 430, hold there for a minute or so, then surge on up to 450.  
   
  As I look over the logs from today I see that the long first stage would flatten out at 350 - 352 (indicated) and hold there at about 3:00 on the first batch of the day, and at about 2:00 on subsequent batches, while chaff collector temp would continue to rise at about 10-20 deg/min.  
   
  Second stage, programmed to 435, would level off at 395-397 indicated and hold there, though chaff collector temp would continue to climb.  Since the air inlet temp is about 75 degrees higher than indicated temp, the rise makes sense, but no idea why a program of 435 would hold at 395.
   
  Third stage (410 programmed) holds at 395-397  indicated, then 4th stage (335 programmed) drops to 350-352 indicated and holds there like a leech.
   
  So while the machine seems pretty temperature-agile, it doesn't follow the programming very closely.  Whether this is more undocumented Microsoft-type foolishness ("That's not a bug, it's a feature!") or just clunkiness is probably moot.  It (finally!) seems that for the price point we've got a pretty usable machine, albeit with a fair amount of "personality".
   
  Hm, just noted the length of this post...  That coffee SAID it was decaf...
   
  Michael Wade
   
---------------------------------
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14) From: Aaron Peterson
Through my various experiments with my iRoast2, this is what I've come to
use and think is as good as anything else I've tried at least:
I use preset 2 with a thermocouple threaded into the bean mass.  I've tried
custom curve settings, but watching my thermocouple temperatures seems to
indicate I get roughly the same curve no matter what I punch in.  When the
temperature stays steady at 435F on the thermocouple or starts to heat
beyond, I hit cool.  That works out great for most beans.  I call this C+
but have no idea if I'm right.  Generally first crack has ended or is just
about to end at this time. Sometimes I want a darker roast on a Sumatra or
something.  For those occasions I stop at 445 or 450F, but seldom go beyond
that.  I never see any oil, and the beans generally need some rest before
the taste settles down (especially when stopped at 435!).  The roast times
vary, but generally are in the 6-9 minute range.  I use 130-140g portions o=
f
green coffee per roast.
Aaron Peterson
Versailles, KY

15) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
The Coffee Kid wrote:
"I thought I had it all figured out."
Been there, done that!  Coffee roasting has handed me quite a number of =
lessons in humility, some quite severe, with many more to come, no =
doubt.
The coffees that I roasted using the profile below will need to rest and =
be sampled (I don't feel qualified to use the term "cupped") daily for a =
week or more before I'll know much more than the fact that the =
"stretched" roast shows real promise as a technique for at least some =
coffees.
I feel that I simply have to stop this free-form experimenting now and =
install my thermocouple into the roast chamber so that I can start =
quantifying my results. 
Oh, and speaking of lessons, the stalled roast was just... nasty.  Oddly =
sweet tasting, though.
Michael Wade

16) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Larry, thanks for weighing in on this.  Your post adds perspective: 
"My other profiles are also of the increasing-temp-over-time variety, =
rather than the cool-hot-warm type that Gene and Hearthware seem to =
prefer."  
I do feel that the "cool-hot-warm(-hot?) profile shows promise in =
building body from my few clumsy tests.  
And the obvious conclusion I've come to after hearing from you, George =
Steinert, Aaron Peterson and several others is to stop fooling around =
and get a thermocouple into the bean mass...
Thanks to you all,
Michael Wade

17) From: HailSeeszer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I mostly roast decaf (wish it wasn't so, but have to cut the =
caffeine...) so I was wondering if anyone has much experience with decaf =
profiles for the iRoast II.
 
I also have a Gene Café, but I am finding it so much easier to roast =
decaf with that unit.  I was reading on another forum where some folks =
practice stopping the roast as soon as they reach what they wanted to =
achieve, but they don't go into cool mode.  They immediately stop the =
cooling and go to a manual cooling method so they can cool the beans in =
1 or 2 minutes rather than the 10 minutes it usually takes on the Gene =
Café.  Supposedly they then don't have to "anticipate" the final roast =
with having to coast through the slow cooling on the GC.
 
Anyway, thanks in advance!
 
Jim
From: homeroast-admin =
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wade
Sent: Sunday, April 30, 2006 9:41 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Info From Hearthware Re: iRoast2 Roast Profiles
 
Larry, thanks for weighing in on this.  Your post adds perspective: 
 
"My other profiles are also of the increasing-temp-over-time variety, =
rather than the cool-hot-warm type that Gene and Hearthware seem to =
prefer."  
 
I do feel that the "cool-hot-warm(-hot?) profile shows promise in =
building body from my few clumsy tests.  
 
And the obvious conclusion I've come to after hearing from you, George =
Steinert, Aaron Peterson and several others is to stop fooling around =
and get a thermocouple into the bean mass...
 
Thanks to you all,
 
Michael Wade


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