HomeRoast Digest


Topic: one sweet coffee (29 msgs / 693 lines)
1) From: Les
The Brazil Cup of Exc. #13 Nazareth Dias Pereira is one excellent
coffee.  It is excllent in all brew methods.  Drip, Chemex, KBM, Vac
Pot, French Press, and Espresso.  It is one of the finest SO espressos
I have ever had, smooth, balanced, sweet, complex with great mouthfeel
and no bitterness.  It has a very nice chocolate aftertaste with a
hint of vanilla.  This is one of those must try coffees in my book. 
If my stash wasn't so big, I would order a 10 pounder of this stuff!
Les

2) From: Brett Mason
I won't do it, I won't do it, I won't do it, I won't do it, I won't do it, =
I
won't do it, I won't do it, I won't do it, I won't do it, no matter what Le=
s
says, I won't do it...
What if I only buy a small amount?
Brett
On 4/29/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
--
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

3) From: Woody DeCasere
i have to agree as far as FP goes, havent had it any other way yet, but
really surprised me, great coffee, a must buy!!
--
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

4) From: Gary Townsend
Les wrote:
The Brazil Cup of Exc. #13 Nazareth Dias Pereira is one excellent coffee.
[snip]
Les: shhhhhhh !!!!   ;-)
I only nabbed 5#'s of it....  ;-)
This was my Easter morning coffee via Yama pot, naturally.
I was wondering if/when the word got out how long it would remain available
before it sold out?
Wonder what the all time record is ???
Gary... Enjoying a fresh cup of Yama brewed CR Tres Rios ( City ++)...life
is pretty good...even on a rainy day ;-)
"I may be wrong, but I'm never in doubt." MM

5) From: Tom Ogren
I'm sipping "The Naz" for the first time as I type this. It was in my
mailbox today and I just roasted and FPed two samples. First I did a
C+ roast which I now suspect was more of a City roast. I tasted and
found it to be a tad wild and one dimensional, tending toward a slight
bitterness. This is almost certainly due to too short a roast and a
lack of rest for the beans is surely a factor too. Once again I'm
guilty of waiting about fifteen minutes 'post-roast' before tasting,
which is unfair to the coffee and misleading to my mouth.
The second sample was a true FC roast. I am using a Poppery II for
roasting and tend to find myself preferring the FC or FC+ roasts, even
when lighter is recommended by others for a particular bean. Having no
temperature control, my roasts have been going too fast (poor man's
variac is in the mail: read-100' extension cord which may help?) and
so my lighter roasts are simply underdeveloped, lacking the detail and
the mouthfeel that I'm sure would be present with a longer roast. I am
doing tiny quantities, 1/4 cup per roast, so other measures must be
applied!
So back to Brazil, the Nazareth is still not wowing me right now. I
really want to like it as much as others I've read raving about this
coffee. I did catch the graham cracker aroma once, about ten minutes
ago, but it was brief. I do not get sweetness really...even calling it
bittersweet would be a stretch at this point. So either my tastebuds
are broken, this coffee  does poorly in a popper, or the most likely:
These beans require rest after roasting, perhaps more than some
others. I sampled the Pico del Tucan immediately post-roast and it
happened to be the most spectacular cup of the entire pound (counter
to the experience of some others). Actually I still have a bit
left...I really, really like the Tucan.
I expect that Nazareth will settle into something very nice in a day
or two. I can sense the impending balance of the cup, and wait for the
religous experience described by some others. This homeroasting really
is fun.
~Tom in VA
On 4/29/06, Woody DeCasere  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Les
Tom,
Try this with your Poppery.  Rather than measuring the beans, simply
turn on your machine and start pouring your beans in until the just
stop rotating.  Then set the bag of greens down and tilt the roaster a
bit to get the beans moving again.  When they hit the straw color
stage or even a bit before that the will have expanded and lost enough
moisture that  you can put it level again.  After 18 years of roasting
with a Poppery this gave the most complex cup unless you have a good
scale to weigh you beans.  If you do, you do the same thing except you
stop the roast immediately and weigh the beans.  This is the ideal
weight for your machine.  Air roasters do a much better job roasting
by weight rather than volume.  I suspect your better roast with the
Tucan is due to the fact that it is a much denser bean so your 1/4 cup
weighted a lot more than "The Naz."  Give this method a try and you
might just be amazed!
Les
On 4/29/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

7) From: Tom Ogren
Les,
Thanks so much. A scale is in my very near future. Aaaaah, Tom Owen was
right when he told that journalist that home roasting was not necessarily a
'money saving' hobby. He is all too familiar with the obsession and the gea=
r
lust involved...(Doing my dangdest to resist...can't
hold...out....much....longer...)
Still, the economy of thought behind your idea is appealing. I had not even
considered that there was an "ideal roast weight" for each machine. Makes
total sense though. If I do a tin can chimney for my popper, would I find i=
t
helpful to do "tilting" at other times during the roast, or should I get a
thermometer and start attempting to do profiles, moving back and forth
between power strip and 100-footer? Or is that too ambitious for a Poppery?
Or is it just really annoying to fire a ton of questions at once?
Sorry...but it's apparent that you are something of a font of knowledge on
the subject and I am new to this game. Thanks again and please do not feel
compelled to answer...I'm just spitballing here for anyone who's reading.
Another newb lost in the woods...
~TO
Happy to be aboard!
On 4/29/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Wendy Sarrett
Cool!!   I have it UPSing it's way to me as I type.   I was so excited 
when I nabbed my 5lbs I had to tell anyone I know who might appreciate it!
Wendy
Gary Townsend wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Gary Townsend
Tom Ogren wrote:
Still, the economy of thought behind your idea is appealing. I had not even
considered that there was an "ideal roast weight" for each machine. Makes
total sense though. If I do a tin can chimney for my popper, would I find i=
t
helpful to do "tilting" at other times during the roast, or should I get a
thermometer and start attempting to do profiles, moving back and forth
between power strip and 100-footer? Or is that too ambitious for a Poppery?
Or is it just really annoying to fire a ton of questions at once?
Sorry...but it's apparent that you are something of a font of knowledge on
the subject and I am new to this game. Thanks again and please do not feel
compelled to answer...I'm just spitballing here for anyone who's reading.
Another newb lost in the woods...
Tom,
Welcome On Board!
If you have some free time this evening, I recommend that you check out:
www.homeroasters.org/
Soon enough, you will be surgically altering ordinary electrical appliances=
,
transforming them into coffee roasting machines. ;-)
There's tons of information there on popper roasting...as well as other way=
s
to brown up the beans....
Happy Roasting !
Gary
--
"I may be wrong, but I'm never in doubt." MM

10) From: Gary Townsend
Wendy Sarrett  wrote:
Cool!!
I have it UPSing it's way to me as I type.
I was so excited when I nabbed my 5lbs I had to tell anyone I know who migh=
t
appreciate it!
Wendy,
Since the word is out, ( and I am sooooo glad that I got mine already ),
it's truly awesome coffee.
I think that Tom wrote "as good as it gets" in his review, and that's all
that I needed to hear!
Yep, it costs a little bit more...but it's sure worth it!!!
I got hooked on good Brazilians last year, and haven't bought a Columbian
coffee since!
It's nice getting 3 different 5# coffees every month. That way I'm able to
keep on top of the new coffees that Tom slides into the cart.
Gary
--
"I may be wrong, but I'm never in doubt." MM

11) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Tom Ogren wrote:
<Snip>
nope. But then I have a dual variac, fan boosted, pid'ed, computer 
controled Poppery that can hold a profile to 1 degree.
or at least if I want it to.
<Snip>

12) From: Ed Needham
Keep it simple and elegant.  It doesn't have to be expensive and all the 
bells and whistles just get in the way for me.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

13) From: Michael Dhabolt
Tom,
By all means try the tin can chimney.  Next step after the chimney is
load the popper with it tilted until you have just a little bit of
bean circulation - the circulation will speed up as the beans lighten
and the roast progresses.  This should max out the bean load and leave
the machine tilted through the entire roast - you may even find out
the load is too much for a chimney as short as the tin can.  And the
adventure continues.
Keep in mind the sage advice of another of our resident founts of knowledge=
:
<Snip>
untill you just can't:
<Snip>
In the mean time do whatever is necessary to come up with a Poppery 1
before your resistance evaporates.
Mike (just plain)

14) From: Tom Ogren
Thanks everyone for the good advice. As to the Poppery1, doesn't
having the extra wattage speed the roasting process (undesirable?) Why
all this reverance for the P1? Is it a matter of superior build
quality?, sex appeal? The ladies love the P1! That's it isn't it?
Dag, I really want to hurry up and love this Nazareth, so I can feel
right about committing to a fiver before it all goes bye-bye. Gotta
think it won't last long with the great word of mouth it's receiving.
Lots of solid praise from those who know...the old-school as it were.
I ought to just go for it and quit fancy-pantsing around. If I can't
make myself love this coffee, I ain't roasting it right! That's just
my gut feeling. Now if there were a way to speed the resting process,
I'd be in business!
~TO
On 4/29/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
ge:
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

15) From: Les
Well, after 18 years of homeroasting with a Popper I learned a few
tricks.  A tin can is a must.  The plastic will warp and melt
eventually anyway.  You can get as ambitious as you want!  I found
that by getting the right weight and either moving up or down a little
I could come up with some good profiles. However you need to know that
a fluid bed is more dense with more beans.  So by adding more beans
you will roast faster up to a point.  If you use less beans the roast
slows down up to a point.  No problem with the questions that is what
this list is about.  The Homeroast site is a great place too!  By the
way, I moved to a drum about 2 years ago and don't plan on going back!
Les
On 4/29/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
ear
<Snip>
en
<Snip>
 it
<Snip>
a
<Snip>
y?
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
l
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
m
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
y
<Snip>

16) From: Ed Needham
The P1 is built like a tank from a cast metal framework.  It is also easy to 
modify and separate the blower from the heater since both are house current. 
Other poppers have the two tied together where if you ran either one 
separately on house current the magic smoke would come out and it wouldn't 
work anymore.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

17) From: Ed Needham
Where do you put the furniture and stuff?
(g)

18) From: Peter Zulkowski
You know,
I  tried using different length extension cords.... switching them for 
profiling..
but I got really tired running back and forth across the yard...
PeterZ
Les wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Peter Zulkowski
Drums are for dancin'  :)
PeterZ
Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Michael Dhabolt
Tom,
<Snip>
quality?, sex appeal? The ladies love the P1! That's it isn't it?<
You got it, it's that the ladies love it ;^}
At least mine does - a lot more compliments than my previous roasting
methods.  And other than my gene pool problem with that darned geek
thing, I'm sure that is a major driving force (of course the taste of
the coffee may have something to do with it).
All of the above points, plus the roast chamber is substantially
larger.  After addressing the chimney issue and heat control (variac,
'poor mans variac', PID) its not all that difficult by doing an
inexpensive fan speed control mod to get to the level of 1/2 lb. net
roasts.  Gives you the ability to get up to 13, 14 minute roasts (or
longer) with easily accomplished stretch (your choice of amount of
time) between 1st and 2nd.  Make it taste like really bright fluid bed
roast or softer fuller drum like profile or most any place in between.
Just generally gives you a lot of flexibility in bringing out of the
coffee what is in there, and doing it to your taste.  A really cool
tool.
Mike (just plain jaded)

21) From: b cook
On 4/30/06, Peter Zulkowski  wrote:
<Snip>
*rimshot*
brad

22) From: Les
Michael,
Tom the newbie real needs to see your highly modified P1.  I wonder if
he would recognize that it was a Popper at one point!
Les
On 4/29/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

23) From: Tom Ogren
So I'm sipping it right now, as I type...again. Earlier this morning,
I pressed some of yesterday's roast (rested for fifteen hours) and the
coffee had sweetened a bit. It qualified as a very nice cup of coffee
, to be sure, but I still was not knocked out. So I conclude that my
roast technique must need work.
I immediately tried again. As Les recommended, I turned on the popper
and poured beans until they stopped moving, and then tilted the
popper. I then got anxious when the only beans moving in the chamber
were the ones tossed up in that single 'rooster tail o' beans' on the
upper side of the tilt, so I stirred with the handle of my wooden
spoon for a while and then set level again after they had lost a
little moisture. I have found that the beans won't move when tilted
until they have lost most of their moisture. Is this OK...should I
still tilt or just keep level, where they do tend to move about?
Anyway, I have no scale at this time and did not stop to measure
volume, but I'm pretty sure I had around 1/2 cup in there (I've done a
number of 1/2 cup roasts and this looked comparable. First crack went
like this: (2:50{3:05-4:05}4:20)
There was a gap of about one minute between end of first crack and
start of second crack and I stopped about ten snaps into second (I am
certain it was second--Snap & Crackle made it through the door, but
Pop got the velvet rope); Total time of roast: 5 1/2 minutes. Whoopee,
I broke that ever-elusive five minute mark. Still...I gotta lengthen
that gap. Oh well it's good to have a goal I s'pose.
So I immediately ground and pressed (OK, I rested the batch for 3 1/2
minutes) and danged if there ain't jasmine in the cup! I thought that
I wouldn't recognize jasmine if it walked up and smacked me on the
forehead, but the aroma of this brew summoned up my olfactory memory
and I smell jasmine! It's also a great deal sweeter than yesterday's
roast.
So at this point I feel that my roast technique for this coffee needs
plenty of work, but that these beans have tremendous potential. To
quote Homer Simpson:
Mmmmmm...Nazzzzzzzzzzareth......Mmmghglllllllgghh.
On 4/30/06, b cook  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Michael Dhabolt
Tom,
<Snip>
were the ones tossed up in that single 'rooster tail o' beans' on the
upper side of the tilt<
The single 'rooster tail o' beans' is enough to keep the circulation
going during the initial stages of the roast.  The beans land on the
opposite side of the chamber, slowly work their way toward the bottom
and keep a real slow circulation going.  As the beans become lighter
the circulation will become more active.
The way I roast (I have fan speed control) is to adjust the fan to
keep a very slow circulation going during the entire roast.  The bean
circulation needs to be just fast enough to keep the beans from
'tipping' (individual beans showing small burned areas) and kicking
off divets, any faster circulation is just wasted heat going up the
chimney.  Untill you have your heat control down pat, kicking excess
heat out of the system is necessary so as not to roast too fast.
With my "Ubber Popper":http://tinyurl.com/bhfyqI take advantage of the 120 Volt fan motor in the Poppery 1 by useing
a small panel mount variac to control voltage (0 to 138 Volts) to the
fan and thereby gaining control of bean circulation rate.  The control
box also contains a PID which allows me to 'program' my roast
profiles, I used a larger variac for heat control prior to going a
little 'over the top' with the PID thing.  The blue coil cord is from
the Thermocouple probe the tip of which is placed thru the side into
the center of the roast chamber.
Mike (just plain 'a little over the top')

25) From: B. Scott Harroff
Darn you Les, you got me again.

26) From: Don Cummings
On 4/29/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
I couldn't control myself any longer. I just ordered a couple lbs of the
Brazil Cup of Exc. #13 Nazareth Dias Pereira plus a couple others.  Once
again I have 3 orders en route (12 lbs total this week.)  This is getting
ridiculous.  Seems I can't read a forum without succumbing to the siren cal=
l
of new greens.
OT.  I may need a place to stay when my wife gives me the ultimatum "me or
your damn coffee!"  I am neat and offer some really great coffee but I do
tend to smoke up the house every few days.
Don

27) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I had the same problem. The answer was to get my wife hooked on Capos. =
Five minutes before your e-mail our lawyer called and said there was =
another $1000 in her father's estate that was overlooked and he would =
send the check tomorrow. Her first question was-- Do you need any coffee =
supplies or anything?

28) From: raymanowen
"Do you need any coffee supplies or anything?"
IAPAP?
I (-third person singular present of be, starts interrogatory re south end
of north-bound swine.) -ro
--
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

29) From: Don Cummings
LOL  Actually Anne says nothing about my coffee fixation.  She chuckles at
how much I have and the fact that more keeps coming in.  I figure I have
about 18 months supply of beans if I buy none (and I have only been
collecting since the beginning of March.)  The only coffee she really likes
are those frou frou warm, melted ice cream-like drinks with coffee in there
somewhere but I do make her one of those when she asks.  I kind of smile to
myself when I ask if she can taste the blueberry in her mochaccino.
Tonight I made Puro Scuro Vanilla Bean Ice Cream.  Even I was a fan of that=
,
although I don't think that is what Tom had in mind when he labored to
produce such a fine blend.
Enjoy the $1K worth of new beans.  :)
Don
On 5/2/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
her
<Snip>
eck
<Snip>
all
<Snip>
r
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest