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Topic: 1400 W WereEver Pumper Mod Question (21 msgs / 415 lines)
1) From: Scott Morrison
Hi List,
I have tried looking for the answer to this question in my gmail list
archive but did not see it.
I have a 1400 W pumper. If I try to roast coffee "stock" the whole thing
shuts off after ~5 minutes of roasting time. If I repeat this several times=
,
I can get adequately "city" roasted coffee, if somewhat muted. I want to
remove the thermal fuse from the pumper but I cannot find it.  I seem to
remember someone posting on how to do mods for the 1400 W pumper and that
this one was included.
Thanks,
Scott

2) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
here is Feliz dials upgrades on popers hope it helps
RKhttp://members.cox.net/felixdial/popper.mods.shtml

3) From: Scott Morrison
Thanks Ron,
Looking at that page, I can see that he indeed talks about the 1400 W
version, and the inside look exactly like the insides of the one I have.
The only tweek I done on mine is remove what he calls "thermal fuse" shown
in Fig 5.  This did not help. The popper still shuts down after ~5 minutes
of roasting.  Whatever it is, its removal did not help my problem. Any
thoughts on what this thing is, I also see that it is found on WB poppery 1=
.
I will bypass/disable the "thermostat" tonight.
Scott
On 5/4/06, rnkyle  wrote:
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4) From: Michael Dhabolt
Scott,
I am confused when you say it "shuts down after ~5 minutes".  Are you
referring to the heat or the whole machine including the fan?
If you are referrring to just the heat, your plan to "I will
bypass/disable the "thermostat" tonight." is your solution.  If you
are referring to the whole machine, including the fan, shutting
down....it sounds like you are developing an "open" in the wiring when
it heats up.  I would imagine a new power cord and redoing all the
power terminations should clear it up.
Mike (just plain)

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
A couple months ago I found an a Popcorn Pumper, a big old heavy one,
in a thrift shop. I tried it and the same thing happened that you
describe. A ways into the roast (don't have my notes here) it shut
down completely, as though unplugged. I finished in another popper.
The next day I plugged in the Pumper and it ran. I havne't had a
chance to fiddle around with it since.
Brian
On 5/4/06, Scott Morrison  wrote:
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 1.
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6) From: Scott Morrison
Micheal and Brian,
The whole popper shuts down as if unplugged.  While it is off, I spread the
beans out onto a piece of newspaper.  If I listen carefully, I can hear the
pumper emit a click after which it will run again. This is what make me
think it is some sort of safety mechanism causing the premature shutdown. I
suppose if I were to re-wire it, I might as well split wire it too.
I normally roast in a SS B2B manual roaster, I was just experimenting with =
a
popper as a back up or alternate.
Scott
On 5/4/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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7) From: Michael Dhabolt
Scott,
I am not an expert on the pumper, I stay pretty much with Poppery 1s. 
After taking another look at the picture on the Felix Dial site that
Ron left the link to,  It looks like the power wire goes to a over
temp switch prior to powering the fan and heater.
Again the link that Ron posted is:http://members.cox.net/felixdial/popper.mods.shtml.
Under the section titled "1400Watt WearEver Pumper", look at "Figure
Two".  The little assembly at about 5;30 'O' Clock in the picture has
got to be the culpret.  You can see that both the small black power
wire to the fan and a large white power wire to the heater are hooked
to one terminal and the supply power wire hooks to the other terminal.
 This thing may be adjustable.  I usually remove and wire around this
type of thing (hook all three wires together) because I never leave my
roaster un-attended and I'm comfortable with my ability to turn it off
when necessary.  But seeing as how it is a safety feature, I can not
(in print) recommend that course of action to anyone else.
This arrangement is different from the way the thermostat is installed
in a Poppery 1.  In the P1 the thermostat only controls power to the
heater (not the fan), shutting down the fan when the machine is
overheated and you need to cool things down doesn't seem like the
right course of action.  If I were intent on keeping this safety
feature I think I would try adjusting and readjusting until it allows
the heater to give you the bean temperature you are after, and I'd
move the power wire for the fan to the power side terminal so it would
stay running when this thing cycles the heater.
Mike (just plain)

8) From: Les
Yup,
The Pumper is a total shutdown with the thermal protection in place. 
I have one and really like the profile it does.  Make sure you plug
the butter hole!  There is a hole in the roast chamber to right under
the butter pan.  I plugged mine with a Barnes X 30 cal. bullet.  Total
copper so I don't worry about lead.  It has a good chamber and puts
out almost as good as a Poppery I.
Les
On 5/4/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
"The little assembly at about 5;30 'O' Clock in the picture has got to
be the culpret.  You can see that both the small black power wire to
the fan and a large white power wire to the heater are hooked
to one terminal and the supply power wire hooks to the other terminal.
 This thing may be adjustable.  I usually remove and wire around this
type of thing (hook all three wires together) because I never leave my
roaster un-attended...".
Mike (just plain),
Am I understanding you correctly that a way to bypass this switch (if,
of course, one were to disregard the safety concerns) would be to
disconnect the two white wires and the one black wire and twist all
three together? Anything else to bear in mind?
Thanks,
Brian
On 5/4/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

10) From: Scott Morrison
Brian,
That is a good question, How exactly do I bypass this safety feature (I wil=
l
to take responsibility) ?  Thanks Mike and Les for the suggestions, I have
the butter hole plugged with a wad of aluminum foil.
BTW, I did not try any mods last night, it was too cold and rainy here.
Scott

11) From: Michael Dhabolt
Brian, Scott,
<Snip>
Yes you understand correctly.  A 'feature' such as this overtemp
switch just 'Opens' (disconnects the two terminals) the circuit when
it reaches its set point.  So hooking all three wires that are
connected to it together, removes the culpret from the ciruit.
<Snip>
These are current carrying wires so be sure that your connection is
well insulated to make sure it doesn't short if it inadvertantly
touches anything.  Looking at the pictures, it looks like the wires
could be pulled back down into the lower plastic case and the
connection kept in this lower temperature location.  That would leave
only the large black and one large white wire (to the heater
terminals) in the upper area. A connection using a double ended male
spade and well insulated with electrical tape / shrink tubing etc. is
probably what I'd do.  I'm not a big enthusiast of wiring nuts, but
cutting the female spade connections off the wires stripping a bit of
insulation from them and using a wiring nut would work also.
If you decide to split the circuits this would be the time to do it. 
Even if you don't decide on this course of action, this would be a
good time to take the fan out of the switched circuit and swap it's
wires directly to the power cord.  Leave the switch controlling the
heater only.  This will allow turning the heater off at the end of
roast and cooling with just the fan running.
The dual power cord arrangement allows you to control the heater with
a variac or other control device without affecting the fan.  If you do
a dual power cord split of the circuits, use a little larger power
cord for the heater circuit and a modern plug with one wide and one
thin blade.  Make sure that the cord used for the heater circuit has
the 'Hot' wire switched, this is the wire connected to the 'thin'
blade of your wall recepticle, the 'common' / 'neutral' wire is the
one connected to the 'wide' blade of the wall recepticle.  By
following this practice you are making sure that the rest of the
ciruit is at neutral state when the switch is off.
Mike (just plain)

12) From: Scott Morrison
Mike,
You said "The dual power cord arrangement allows you to control the heater
with
a variac or other control device without affecting the fan.  If you do
a dual power cord split of the circuits, use a little larger power
cord for the heater circuit and a modern plug with one wide and one
thin blade.  Make sure that the cord used for the heater circuit has
the 'Hot' wire switched, this is the wire connected to the 'thin'
blade of your wall recepticle, the 'common' / 'neutral' wire is the
one connected to the 'wide' blade of the wall recepticle.  By
following this practice you are making sure that the rest of the
ciruit is at neutral state when the switch is off."
I have a thick cord just begging to be used for this purpose, however it is
a three prong-grounded style.  It contains three shielded wires on the
inside, blue, brown and green w/ yellow stripe.  It also contains an
unshielded thinner non-copper wire that looks to be there for structural
integrity. Which one of these will be hot and which neutral.  Also what
should I do with the remaining ground wire?  Sorry to ask so many questions=
,
but I think this technical know-how is great for roasters of all kinds.
Thanks,
Scott

13) From: Michael Dhabolt
Scott,
<Snip>
The green with yellow stripe will be the ground.  Blue and brown don't
say anything to me so I would check between the bitter end of the
wires and the plug with a meter.  The wire that has continuity to the
thin blade on the plug would go to the supply side of the switch
(which will supply power to the heater when switched on), the wire
that has continuity to the wide blade on the plug would go to the wire
that is hooked to the other terminal of the heater.  The short pieces
of wire that are already hooked up in the upper section of the pumper
are probably high temp wires (it gets hot next to the metal roast
chamber) so I would leave them in place and connect to them in the
lower (cooler) plastic housing.  These machines did not originally use
a ground (they have a two prong plug) so a person could just cut the
ground wire off - or - if there is an easy place to hook it up to the
metal housing -- you could do that.
Mike (just plain)

14) From: Scott Morrison
Mike,
It turns out on my cord that brown is the switch side and blue is
return/neutral.
Just to make sure I understand this set-up, the new cord I just got will
supply power to the heater, through the rocker switch on the front of the
popper.  The fan will be supplied with power through the current pumper
cord, with no interruption.  All of this will be set-up bypassing the
"thermosotat" at 5:30 in Figure 2.  This is going to be a fun weekend.
Scott
On 5/5/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
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15) From: Michael Dhabolt
Scott,
You got it!  have fun, and start searching for a small variac for your
fan (picture in the other thread).  It'll do wonders for your roaster
control.
Mike (just plain)

16) From: Scott Morrison
Mike, Brian, and Les,
Thanks for all your help and suggestions.
I will update once I know haow it all turns out, or as soon as I have
another question.
Scott
On 5/5/06, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Brian Kamnetz
Mike (just plain), Scott, and Les,
Thanks for all the food for thought. I have a rather large project
(moving) just about out of the way, and in the next couple months will
probably have some time. I have been roasting with a Poppery II
lightly modded (switch to the heat element) but in the next month or
so I hope to dig out the big old Pumper and start playing with mods to
the fan and heat. Should be fun! This discussion will certainly come
out of the mothballs at that time.
Thanks again for all the good info.
Brian
On 5/5/06, Scott Morrison  wrote:
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18) From: David B. Westebbe
 I plugged mine with a 
<Snip>
What kind of muzzle velocity and accuracy do you get with a Poppery I?  :)

19) From: Michael Wascher
Other than unplug it first? ;)
I'd be concerned about the method used to tie them together. Don't use
plastic wire nuts from the hardware store.
Use something that'll take the heat. If possible, reuse existing terminals
-- if you can connect all three wires to one terminal on the overtemp devic=
e
would be a good way to go.
On 5/5/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
--
"Life is just one damned thing after another."
  - Elbert Hubbard

20) From: Les
Scott,
I still believe that the Poppery 1 and the Wearever Pumper 1400 are
the best bang for your buck out there.  So, good luck and don't fret
you will be doing as good or better roasts than any of the electric
commercial roasters out there in MNSHO.   I have not tried a SC/TO,
but my guess is it is a fine way to roast too!  Maybe I will build one
this winter just to say I have done it!
Les
On 5/5/06, Scott Morrison  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: raymanowen
Man say:
"It has a good chamber and puts out almost as good as a..."
That's what you'd call a Real Popper. Bet you get a bang out of it! -ro
--
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976


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