HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony (20 msgs / 528 lines)
1) From: David Soleil
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi all,
I'm a newby to the list and have just gotten into roasting after a two-week
trip to Kona.  Not a bad place to discover roasting! 
Anyway, I live in the Los Angeles area and have made frequent trips to the
section of town called "Little Ethiopia" where I experienced their fabulous
coffee ceremony "buna" (adapted for restaurants). fresh roasted beans,
strong coffee, burning frankincense, etc.  I wanted to know if anyone out
there is familiar with the coffee used, roast, grind, etc.  Here's what I've
seen and found so far.
1.       Before they bring you the coffee, they bring out a small saucepan
with roasting beans so you can smell the aromas.  They seem to pan-roast.
Some accounts I've seen say the beans are roasted until dark brown releasing
the oils of the beans.  This seems to be Full City+ or Vienna.  However, at
the restaurants the beans I've seen coming out are relatively tan in color.
Does anyone know how dark they are roasting?  Would they stall a roast just
for show?  
2.       Any guess on what kind of beans they use?  They also don't seem to
let the roast sit at all.  It's roast, grind, add water and serve.
3.       Then, for brewing, I've read the freshly roasted beans are ground
fine with a mortal and pestel.  Here's a recipe I found.
How to brew Ethiopian Coffee (Ground Ethiopian Style)
Bring 1 cup of water to boil
Add 2 Tbsp coffee
Keep boiling until the foam disappears
Let grinds settle
Add 2 tsp sugar
Serve in Ethiopian Coffee Cup
The restaurants don't add sugar but it is a strong, espresso-like cup and is
an amazing finish to a meal.
I'd love to hear from anyone who knows any more this.  Also, if you've
already had this discussion, just point me to the right archive.  I haven't
found it yet.
Thanks!
Dave  

2) From: Les
Dave,
Back in my college days, I worked on a Linguistics project for UNACEF
developing a language learning module for famine relief workers in
Eritrea.  I spent 6 months working with Ethiopian language informants
and we had coffee almost every night.  They used an Ibrik.  I have
made this coffee using Harar Horse and basic Ibrik brew techniques. 
Yum Yum!  What I make at home now is better than the stuff I had while
working on my M.A.  I roast to a nice full city.
Les
On 5/6/06, David Soleil  wrote:
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3) From: Don Cummings
On 5/6/06, David Soleil  wrote:
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If you read Tom's cupping notes on the Ethiopians he discusses how
Ethiopians roast really light.  Possibly before 1st crack even.  If the
beans were tan then this might actually be the case at the restaurants.
Ethiopian beans do do well at lighter roasts. They have great brght sides
and fun origin character. My personal tastes call for some roast character
to balance the cup.  I prefer the Ethiopians at City + to Full City.
  2.       Any guess on what kind of beans they use?  They also don't seem
<Snip>
Hopefully they are using Ethiopians. :)  Feel comfortable trying any of
Tom's Ethiopians. They are all exceptional.
  3.       Then, for brewing, I've read the freshly roasted beans are groun=
d
<Snip>
Sounds like Turkish brew.
Have fun trying out the different roasts and brewing methods.  This is one
great addiction, I mean hobby.
Don
<Snip>

4) From: Frank Parth
David,
I live in Orange County, just south of L.A., and don't know where Little Ethiopia is!. Where did you find this?
On Saturday, May 06, 2006, at 09:44AM, David Soleil  wrote:
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5) From: Karl
On 5/7/06, Frank Parth  wrote:
<Snip>http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=fairfax+ave+%26+W+olympic+Blv=d,+Los+Angeles,+CA+90035&ll=34.05785,-118.361292&spn=0.017528,0.042057&=
om=1

6) From: Julie H Tieszen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I went to our local Ethiopioan restaurant this weekend with 4 other =
couples. We ate lunch then participated in the coffee cermony. I was =
curious as to how they would roast the coffee and to what level. They =
brought out the green beans to show us and then took them back to the =
kitchen to roast them. After awhile I couldn't stand it anymore and made =
my way back to the kitchen to see what they were doing. They were pan =
roasting it on the stove and were just finishing when I got there. It =
was WELL into second crack with some beans looking like French roasted =
and some looking cinnamon. I'm guessing they didn't stir it very well. =
They prepared it with cardomon, cinnamon, cloves and chicory. It =
actually quite tasty. I have no idea it this is how Ethiopians always =
roast their coffee but I thought I'd share this unique experience.
Julie (hg/db roasting in ice covered VA)

7) From: Tara Kollas
Ethiopian coffee tends to roast pretty unevenly (never had oily and cinnamon
in the same roast, though).  But you will have a variety of roast level with
Ethiopian coffees (assuming that's what they were using?).  Sounds great,
though!
On 2/18/07, Julie H Tieszen  wrote:
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8) From: Michael Wascher
I've managed that in an overloaded popper. I couldn't keep the beans well
agitated. It turned out rather well, though. An interesting range of flavors
in the cup.
--MikeW
On 2/18/07, Tara Kollas  wrote:
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-- 
"In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but
planning is indispensable." --Dwight D. Eisenhower

9) From: Sheila Quinn
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Hey, it's really COOL that they roast the coffee right there. I've never 
heard of a restaurant doing such a thing, so kudos to them!!!
Sheila
Julie H Tieszen wrote:
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Hey, it's really COOL that they roast the coffee right there. I've
never heard of a restaurant doing such a thing, so kudos to them!!!
Sheila
Julie H Tieszen wrote:
  
  
  
  I went to our local Ethiopioan
restaurant this weekend with 4 other couples. We ate lunch then
participated in the coffee cermony. I was curious as to how they would
roast the coffee and to what level. They brought out the green beans to
show us and then took them back to the kitchen to roast them. After
awhile I couldn't stand it anymore and made my way back to the kitchen
to see what they were doing. They were pan roasting it on the stove and
were just finishing when I got there. It was WELL into second crack
with some beans looking like French roasted and some looking cinnamon.
I'm guessing they didn't stir it very well. They prepared it with
cardomon, cinnamon, cloves and chicory. It actually quite tasty. I have
no idea it this is how Ethiopians always roast their coffee but I
thought I'd share this unique experience.
   
  Julie (hg/db roasting in ice covered
VA)
--------------030005000509090208060100--

10) From: p&k
This sounds really interesting can you tell us where the restaurant is?
   
  Paul
   
"The indisputable truth is that no coffee is fresh if it isn't fresh
roasted." - - Martin Diedrich
 
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11) From: Patrick S. Harper
I do that with 2 different batch's of the same bean roasted to different
levels and mixed together for a pretty unique flavor sometimes.

12) From: Sandra Andina
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We have a neighbor who owns the Ethiopian restaurant around the  
corner, and every summer at our block party potluck brunch he  
performs the Ethiopian coffee ceremony. It was what first got me  
interested in roasting.
On Feb 18, 2007, at 3:57 PM, Julie H Tieszen wrote:
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Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
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We have a neighbor who owns the =
Ethiopian restaurant around the corner, and every summer at our block =
party potluck brunch he performs the Ethiopian coffee ceremony. It was =
what first got me interested in roasting.
On Feb 18, 2007, =
at 3:57 PM, Julie H Tieszen wrote:
I went to our local = Ethiopioan restaurant this weekend with 4 other couples. We ate lunch = then participated in the coffee cermony. I was curious as to how they = would roast the coffee and to what level. They brought out the green = beans to show us and then took them back to the kitchen to roast them. = After awhile I couldn't stand it anymore and made my way back to the = kitchen to see what they were doing. They were pan roasting it on the = stove and were just finishing when I got there. It was WELL into second = crack with some beans looking like French roasted and some looking = cinnamon. I'm guessing they didn't stir it very well. They prepared it = with cardomon, cinnamon, cloves and chicory. It actually quite tasty. I = have no idea it this is how Ethiopians always roast their coffee but I = thought I'd share this unique experience. Julie (hg/db roasting in ice covered = VA)
= Sandra = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-66-284878501--

13) From: Cameron Forde
Hi Sandy,
I seem to recall that you are in Andersonville, is that right?  We
were in an apartment on Balmoral near Clark for a couple of years in
the late 90's.  It is a great neighbourhood with lots of great
restaurants (we still compare any Italian restaurant we go to with La
Donna), but I can't remember if there was an Ethiopian restaurant
nearby.  We went to a couple of Ethiopian restaurants down near
Wrigley (not that I can remember the names now).
Cameron
On 2/18/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
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-- 
ceforde

14) From: Sandra Andina
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Hi, Cameron,
I'm a mile to the north, in Edgewater Glen. (When I lived in  
Andersonville 1979-87, I lived in an apt. on the corner of Balmoral  
and Glenwood). The Ethiopian restaurant to which I refer is the  
Ethiopian Diamond on B'way and Glenlake; there's also Ras Darbar  
(which is Kosher!) on B'way and Ardmore.
On Feb 19, 2007, at 12:44 PM, Cameron Forde wrote:
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Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-85-330253993
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Hi, Cameron,
I'm a mile to the north, in = Edgewater Glen. (When I lived in Andersonville 1979-87, I lived in an = apt. on the corner of Balmoral and Glenwood). The Ethiopian restaurant = to which I refer is the Ethiopian Diamond on B'way and Glenlake; there's = also Ras Darbar (which is Kosher!) on B'way and Ardmore. On = Feb 19, 2007, at 12:44 PM, Cameron Forde wrote:
Hi Sandy, I seem to recall that you are in = Andersonville, is that right?  = Wewere in an apartment on Balmoral = near Clark for a couple of years inthe late = 90's.  It is a great = neighbourhood with lots of greatrestaurants = (we still compare any Italian restaurant we go to with LaDonna), but I can't remember if there was an = Ethiopian restaurantnearby.  We went to a couple of = Ethiopian restaurants down nearWrigley (not = that I can remember the names now). = Sandra = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-85-330253993--

15) From: Bill Morgan
On 2/18/07, Julie H Tieszen  wrote:
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Been a long time since I had one of those.  Ahhh, the memories!
Berbere-less in Austin,
Bill

16) From: Bill Morgan
On 2/19/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
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On Feb 18, 2007, at 3:57 PM, Julie H Tieszen wrote:
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Been a long time since I had one of those.  Ahhh, the memories!
Berbere-less in Austin,
Bill

17) From: Julie H Tieszen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's in VA. Are you anywhere near there?

18) From: Michael Wascher
No, but I'm usually in Vienna, VA in August indulging in my other hobby at
the DC Pen Show.
Is it near Vienna?
On 2/19/07, Julie H Tieszen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but
planning is indispensable." --Dwight D. Eisenhower

19) From: Robert Joslin
Herndon or Reston?
On 2/19/07, Michael Wascher  wrote:
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20) From: p&k
Amazing what you learn from the list, after reading about the Ethiopian  Coffee ceremony, I started hunting for an ethiopian restaurant in Los  Angeles so I could participate in one.I found out there is a whole  section of L.A. designeated as Little Ethiopia with several fine  restaurants,  one was voted best by an U.S. Ethiopian Restaurant  Guide. Once again the list comes through improving our minds, lives and  coffee nirvana
    
    Thanks again
  Paul
  
"The indisputable truth is that no coffee is fresh if it isn't fresh
roasted." - - Martin Diedrich
 
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