HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The hotel blues (20 msgs / 548 lines)
1) From: Greg C. Rose
I've read previous posts about bringing coffee grinding/brewing equipment 
with you on trips and I thought these people were crazy.  Now I realize why 
this was done, because I lived it this last weekend.  Hotel coffee must be 
the worst on the planet.  I choked down a few cups to keep the caffeine need 
in check, but it was like drinking mud water.  By the second day, I was 
homesick for the homeroast.
I'm interested in what ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in 
travel.  I don't have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions will 
guide my purchases.
Greg
I've read previous posts about bringing coffee grinding/brewing 
equipment with you on trips and I thought these people were crazy.  Now 
I realize why this was done, because I lived it this last 
weekend.  Hotel coffee must be the worst on the planet.  I choked 
down a few cups to keep the caffeine need in check, but it was like drinking 
mud water.  By the second day, I was homesick for the homeroast.
 
I'm interested in what ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in 
travel.  I don't have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions 
will guide my purchases.
 
Greg

2) From: Jim McClellan
Greg,
Just back from a weekend. Took with me, as always for hotel stays, the small size Eva Cafe Solo for brewing, turkish Zass for grinding, small bodum ibris for heating water, selection of fresh roast. Easy to pack, easy to make and easy to clean up. In the past have used a french press and a one-cup pour over. Like the Solo best for quality and ease of use/cleaning.
Jim - can't drink that hotel swill either.
"Greg C. Rose"  wrote:   I've read previous posts about bringing coffee grinding/brewing  equipment with you on trips and I thought these people were crazy.  Now  I realize why this was done, because I lived it this last  weekend.  Hotel coffee must be the worst on the planet.  I choked  down a few cups to keep the caffeine need in check, but it was like drinking  mud water.  By the second day, I was homesick for the homeroast.
   
  I'm interested in what ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in  travel.  I don't have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions  will guide my purchases.
   
  Greg
 

3) From: Sandy Andina
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Depending on what equipment is in the hotel/motel room (I always call  
ahead), I always carry a mug or travel press (doubles as a mug), Zass  
Turkish, scoop, and beans, plus:
If there is a drip coffeemaker:
4-c. Swissgold flat-bottom basket filter
If there is no coffeemaker but there is a microwave:
Aeropress and its accessories
If there is neither coffeemaker, microwave nor stove:
Bodum mini-Ibis kettle, travel press(es) and/or 1-c. Melitta pourover  
cone and #2 filters
If I will be flying and thus carrying a larger suitcase, I sometimes  
substitute a whirly-blade for the Zass, since it's faster and I  
usually need to grind a pot's worth anyway.
On May 8, 2006, at 11:30 AM, Jim McClellan wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Depending on what equipment is =
in the hotel/motel room (I always call ahead), I always carry a mug or =
travel press (doubles as a mug), Zass Turkish, scoop, and beans, =
plus:
If there is a = drip coffeemaker:4-c. Swissgold flat-bottom basket = filter
If = there is no coffeemaker but there is a microwave:Aeropress = and its accessories
If there is neither = coffeemaker, microwave nor stove:Bodum mini-Ibis kettle, = travel press(es) and/or 1-c. Melitta pourover cone and #2 = filters
If I = will be flying and thus carrying a larger suitcase, I sometimes = substitute a whirly-blade for the Zass, since it's faster and I usually = need to grind a pot's worth anyway. On May 8, 2006, at = 11:30 AM, Jim McClellan wrote:
Greg, Just back from a weekend. Took with me, as always = for hotel stays, the small size Eva Cafe Solo for brewing, turkish Zass = for grinding, small bodum ibris for heating water, selection of fresh = roast. Easy to pack, easy to make and easy to clean up. In the past have = used a french press and a one-cup pour over. Like the Solo best for = quality and ease of use/cleaning. Jim - can't drink that hotel = swill either. "Greg C. Rose" <grose> = wrote: I've read previous posts about bringing coffee = grinding/brewing equipment with you on trips and I thought these people = were crazy.  Now I realize why this was done, because I lived it = this last weekend.  Hotel coffee must be the worst on the planet.  = I choked down a few cups to keep the caffeine need in check, but it was = like drinking mud water.  By the second day, I was homesick for the = homeroast.   I'm interested in what = ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in travel.  I don't = have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions will guide my = purchases.   Greg = = = --Apple-Mail-41--851269744--

4) From: Paul Goelz
At 12:16 PM 5/8/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
Just take along an electric kettle, a French press and a container of 
ground homeroast.  I think you will find that even after a week of 
room temperature storage, pre-ground homeroast will taste better than 
any hotel coffee.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI USA
paul at pgoelz dot com
www.pgoelz.com

5) From: Brett Mason
I travel for somewhat frequently - here's my kit, all of which goes in my
main suitcase, wrapped in shirts for protection:
Bodum French Press (8 cup)
Ziploc bag of beans - put inside french press
Zassenhaus 499 Mill - in a grocery plastic bag to catch grounds
Ziploc bag of add'l beans as required - usually tucked in the shopping bag
with the Zass.
Brett
On 5/8/06, Jim McClellan  wrote:
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Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

6) From: Les
I have the same setup!  Often I will also take a small electric pot
too depending on the motel.
On 5/8/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
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7) From: Spencer Thomas
Looks familiar, although I never thought of putting the beans inside the FP=
.
Zass "knee mill" (156)
Bodum 4 cup FP
Bodum mini-Ibis kettle
Measuring spoon for beans
The mini-Ibis heats enough water for the FP, generally I get two
"mugs" of coffee from it.  The knee mill grinds just about the right
amount of coffee.  Since the FP is glass, I pack it in my carry-on.
Before I had the Zass, I would pregrind the coffee, and pack it in
"individual serving" bags using my vacuum sealer to minimize staling. 
Then I would open a bag, pour it into the FP or filter basket, and
brew.
On 5/8/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
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--
=Spencer in Ann Arbor
My Unitarian Jihad http://tinyurl.com/6valr)Name is:
Sibling Dagger of Mild Reason
What are you?http://homepage.mac.com/whump/ujname.html

8) From:
Greg:
Most rooms usually have those small drip brewers, or take a single cup swiss gold, grind some before you go and your all set.
enjoy,
ginny
---- "Greg C. Rose"  wrote: 
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9) From: Wesley Simon
Last September I visited Mexico City where I stayed at a Hostel.  Breakfast
was on the roof served buffet style.  The coffee was from Chiapas, brewed i=
n
a giant 40 cup urn.  For 10 days in a row, I sat on the roof of that
building, looking out over the Zocolo, sipping the coffee, eating a
breakfast of scrambled eggs, fresh bread, and yogurt and cereal.
I was travelling too light to pack any coffee equipment.  I was willing to
sacrifice drinking good coffee in exchange for the experience.  I am so gla=
d
I drank the urn coffee, it was pure heaven!
Is there such a place to stay anywhere in the states?
On 5/8/06, Spencer Thomas  wrote:
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10) From: Brett Mason
Tom and Maria's house...  Tom's probably in Panama anyway...
On 5/8/06, Wesley Simon  wrote:
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Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

11) From: Aaron
Instead of lugging a pot around, I find that most hotels have microwaves 
either in the rooms or somewhere easily accessable.  A microwave will do 
just as well heating water as carrying a heating pot around will.  I use 
my swiss gold and a zass to grind, but if I am short on space,  just pre 
measure cupfulls and pregrind them and vac seal them in little coffee 
sized baggies.  This way all you have to do is cut open a bag of ground 
coffee, throw it into the swiss gold, pour the boiling water in the top 
and voila,  good coffee.
Aaron

12) From: Peter Zulkowski
Lots of good suggestions on the list. In making my kit I usually make 
room for bottled water.
The stuff coming out of the taps in hotels is just horrible. If I don't 
bring it I just stop in a quick mart for some.
If only going for a weekend I bring pre ground in zip locks.
I have a Zass (3) but when I want coffee in the morning, it needs to be 
ready quickly.
First set the water to heating and assemble the rest.
French press works fine. Ibis mini is fast and coffee fits inside it.
Sugar and cream.
Always forget that. Sometimes the lobby has it ;)
When we go away for the summer I bring the Mazzer Mini, Presto 
Scandinavian, and my Pretty Good Roaster.
A good extension cord to tap into a strong outlet while camping.
Also, lots of my favorite beans from SM :)
PeterZ
Jim McClellan wrote:
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13) From: Brett Mason
For camping, I usually bring my 12" SS skillet, flat steel spatul;a, and a
couple pounds of beans.  Campers always take some coffee home with them too=
.
Where do my future customers come from?
Brett
On 5/8/06, Peter Zulkowski  wrote:
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Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

14) From: an iconoclast
On 5/8/06, Greg C. Rose  wrote:
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Prior to winning the Zass from David (thanks, David), I pre-ground my
coffee into Vacuvin ground coffee containers....but now I can take my
whole beans and grinder!
If I need a lot of coffee, I bring one of my spare Krups Moka Brews. 
The box has a handle, the carafe is locked down and it travels very
well.
If access to hot water and only need a cup at a time, I use the AeroPress.
Take care,
Ann

15) From: Spencer Thomas
On 5/8/06, Peter Zulkowski  wrote:
<Snip>
Absolutely!  But I will buy it locally -- no sense in hauling it on
the plane in the carry-on, and I'm sure as heck not going to pack a
bottle of water in my luggage.  That's just a recipe for wet clothes
(or worse).
--
=Spencer in Ann Arbor
My Unitarian Jihad http://tinyurl.com/6valr)Name is:
Sibling Dagger of Mild Reason
What are you?http://homepage.mac.com/whump/ujname.html

16) From: Spencer Thomas
On 5/8/06, pchforever  wrote:
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iss gold, grind some before you go and your all set.
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I'm always dubious whether they get hot enough.  Although the time I
couldn't fit my FP into the microwave, and I had forgotten my kettle,
I put the grounds right into the little pot, ran the coffeemaker into
the pot, then poured it into the FP to brew and filter.  It tasted
pretty good, and definitely better than the stuff from the urn in the
lobby!
=S

17) From: John David Huddle
I have a carry on size bag, - 4 cup autodrip Melitta brewer, cups, electric 
extension cord, beans, Zass knee mill, filters, Britta filter, etc.
Sometime I take a FreshRoast and  green beans.  Roast in the hotel bathroom 
with the vent fan running.
Dave
-------
From: "Greg C. Rose" 
I've read previous posts about bringing coffee grinding/brewing equipment
with you on trips and I thought these people were crazy.  Now I realize why
this was done, because I lived it this last weekend.  Hotel coffee must be
the worst on the planet.  I choked down a few cups to keep the caffeine need
in check, but it was like drinking mud water.  By the second day, I was
homesick for the homeroast.
I'm interested in what ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in
travel.  I don't have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions will
guide my purchases.
Greg

18) From: John David Huddle
Last summer, on a 15 day tour of China, I took pre-weighed, vac-packed 
beans,  Zass Turkish grinder,  and a Bialetti 2 tasse electric moka pot (110 
or 220 volt).   A very compact set up.
Dave
---------
Subject: +The hotel blues
I've read previous posts about bringing coffee grinding/brewing equipment
with you on trips and I thought these people were crazy.  Now I realize why
this was done, because I lived it this last weekend.  Hotel coffee must be
the worst on the planet.  I choked down a few cups to keep the caffeine need
in check, but it was like drinking mud water.  By the second day, I was
homesick for the homeroast.
I'm interested in what ways you find easiest to grind and brew while in
travel.  I don't have any compact supplies yet, so your suggestions will
guide my purchases.
Greg

19) From: Sharon Allsup
My husband's job requires he travel almost 100% of the time, usually
on <24 hours' notice.  He doesn't like to deal with presspots on the
road, and unlike me he's willing to take his chances with the little
room brewers (ugh).  So we have a permanent traveling-coffee setup for
him.
Husband's setup:
1) Sandwich-sized ziplock with ground coffee (two if a 5-day trip)
2) ~6 size 2 conical filters
3) ~6 small basket filters
4) Small plastic scoop-spoon (came with one of the roasters)
All of the above is placed in a gallon-sized ziplock.  Pre-trip prep
for him involves me roasting and grinding a batch or two (depending
upon how long the trip is), and checking that he's covered for at
least five days of both filter types.  This arrangement easily slips
into the outside pocket of carry-on (plastic scoop to avoid security
issues) or regular suitcases.  About 85% of the time the hotel is
using the small basket-type filters; those are the ones I find myself
having to restock regularly.
My setup, because I'm a bit pickier about trusting the drip brewers:
1) Cheap 1-2qt electric kettle ($10 from Walgreens)
2) NON-GLASS French Press pot
3) Sandwich-sized ziplock with ground coffee
4) Small plastic scoop-spoon
5) Plastic gold filter insert (because the plastic presspot leaves
LOTS of grounds)
... and very grudgingly carried "just in case":
6) ~6 size 2 conical filters
7) ~6 size 2 conical filters
My arrangement won't fit into carry-on because of the kettle, which
looks like a small-sized crockpot.  It does, however, pretty nicely
fit INTO the kettle which then gets stuffed into the suitcase.
If you've got a microwave in the room, a 2-cup Pyrex measuring cup
makes a dandy way to heat the water, and you could dump the coffee
into it, cowboy-style, and then pour it through a filter for serving.
That does work, and it makes pretty darned good coffee.  Measuring Cup
+ Filter + Coffee, basically.
And I'll second what others have said about buying bottled water once
you get there.  We're on well water here at home, and hotel water is
doubly alien and horrid-tasting to me.

20) From: Larry English
My last trip found my coffee kit wanting, thanks to the motel - no
microwave, just one of those little plastic "filter-pack" jobbies that can'=
t
get water to anywhere near hot enough.  I had to walk to the lobby to get
hot water for brewing, making the return trip a bit hazardous.  So -- for
the next trip here's my kit (I travel light, so nothing heavy - well, almos=
t
nothing):
  Immersion heater
  Ground coffee in ziplog bags
  SwissGold 1-cup brewer
  Blue plastic measuring spoon
  Real cup (the only heavy thing in the kit)
This should work fine for up to 5 days.  For longer trips, I'll need to tak=
e
roasted beans and some form of grinder/mill - maybe a Zass Turkish or maybe
just a li'l Traveler II to save weight.  But that won't be until August.
An alternative is to substitute AeroPress for the SwissGold, and then to
double the amount of coffee I pack.  But I'll stick with the SwissGold for
now.
Larry
On 5/11/06, Sharon Allsup  wrote:
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