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Topic: Toggle Switch for Mazzer? (16 msgs / 444 lines)
1) From: john irwin
This morning my grinder would not stay on unless I was holding the switch 
(start).
Has anyone else replaced this switch with a toggle switch?
The last time I modified the super jolly the shaker chute spit coffee 
everywhere.
Since then I have devised my own chutehttp://coffeechaser.com

2) From: Peter Zulkowski
Hi John,
I am not sure about the  SJ but the Major has a two position switch like 
starting a car.
The start position engages a capacitor to get the thing running. Release 
and it is in the on position.
Not sure how you would bypass this...
In regards to grinds going everywhere.. yes, the Major is a spreader also ;)
Check out my solution here:http://snipurl.com/qi5tIt was not expensive either.
PeterZ
Glad it is barely 100F, here in LHC.
john irwin wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Michael Dhabolt
John,
Nice chute.
Someone recently posted that removing and cleaning the switch fixed a
similar problem.  I also remember a caveat about don't completely
dis-assemble the switch (springs and little bits everywhere kind of
thing).
Mike (just plain)

4) From: raymanowen
At least, you don't have to hold it On for more than a few seconds! I asked
Domenic at  to send mine doserless
The grinder control switch by itself is plenty big enough to switch the
motor power, but all it does is energize the latching contactor that
switches the motor power. A doorbell button would really be heavy enough.
There was a fill limit switch in the doser that unlatches the contactor's
coil when the doser is filled with grounds. Something is physically holding
that switch in the "Full" position, or perhaps some dust got in it.
Mine never had the doser or the limit switch.
If you also don't have the doser, it may be that the (blue and clear yellow=
)
wires that formerly connected to the limit switch were just spliced and cam=
e
unspliced. Perhaps they used a wire nut (Boo!) and it fell off. Wire nuts
are really OK- They're just not installed correctly very often. If the nut'=
s
way too big for the pair of small wires- (the likely situation), it will
fall off easily.
Just unplug the grinder (Duh!) lose the hopper, tip it on its back and take
off the bottom plate. It stands upside down nicely too, if you have an
overhead light. Turn on the vacuum with an open hose or crevice tool ! !
Remove the slotted screws holding each of the four feet, plus one more big
slotted screw in the middle of the plate. The two longer screws go on the
back feet on reassembly. There are five smaller screws holding a terminal
strip, the contactor and the ground. Make sure they're tight, otherwise
leave them alone.
The other possibility with the contactor not latching and the motor not
continuing to run after you release the switch is that the overtemperature
sensor in the motor has opened. It is in series with the doser fill limit
switch, so either one can electrically unlatch the contactor and stop the
motor.
There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding about the motor. Running at 120=
0
rpm on 60 Hz, it has to be a 6-pole motor. The motor has no failure-prone
starting switch. There actually is no starting switching of any kind. It is
known as a Permanent Split Capacitor (PSC) motor.
Franklin Electric says this about the motor type:
" The permanent split capacitor motor (PSC) is compact, easy to maintain,
highly efficient and has a high power factor. These single-phase motors hav=
e
a capacitor permanently connected in series with the starting winding. The
starting winding and running winding are connected in parallel and are
therefore in the circuit at all times."
According to their Torque Graph, the torque curve is really pregnant when
the motor is loaded to about 900 rpm. The caution label on the side of the
grinder says to "Run the grinder no more than 30 minutes out of every hour,=
"
for a 50% duty cycle. That's because the huge (60mfd) run cap is in the
circuit all the time. The available torque is higher but the motor tends to
get hot. You could easily grind your whole stash in a weekend!
Just for grins, with the grinder plugged in and the switch turned off, I
pushed down on the contactor armature and the motor ran normally, and
stopped as soon as I released the contactor armature.
With the switch turned on, the contactor latched as soon as I pushed the
armature down, and the motor ran until I turned the switch off.
It is highly unlikely that the overtemp sensor has failed "open." It's not =
a
pesky Thermal Fuse thingy. (Mine measures 0.000 ohms- the two clear gold
insulated wires that disappear into the motor connect to the o/t switch, in
a plastic sleeve which is strapped against a motor winding.)
One of the clear gold insulated wires from the o/t switch in the motor goes
to the grinder control switch. The other gold wire used to go to the fill
limit switch- I never saw it, but it *had* to- now goes to a screw terminal
splice to a blue wire to A1, the contactor coil.
Before I took the grinder to pieces, I mixed 32.5g each of Bolivia organic
Cenaproc Peaberry and Zimbabwe 2A, for 65g total in 45 oz of 204 degree
water. My Second Time Ever for this, my only blend, also second time this
strong, ground 25% larger particulate than my normal TV drip.
I first did this Saturday(13th) afternoon, having just gained an additional
year's wisdom the previous day watching a roasting, grinding and cupping
session. I determined to emulate it on a 1.3 Litre scale in the TechniVorm
with a #4 gold filter. Aged 14 days, it's Dynamic.
Not cupping and expectorating perfectly Fabulous Coffee. That's Sadistic!
I've been alternately admiring this coffee and making smaller pieces out of
the Mazzer as I restudy it.
The Mazzer contactor has connections for L1, L2 and L3. I wish I could find
one with a three phase motor so I could use the 5KVA rotary converter I've
got floating around in the shed and my belfry.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

5) From: thugmusk
[quote title=john irwin wrote on Mon, 15 May 2006 11:53]
Since then I have devised my own chutehttp://coffeechaser.comIs it not there yet?  I see only "I am gathering the pictures and writing the details. check back soon..."
Rich

6) From: john irwin
the mazzer mod for ten buck just posted onhttp://coffeechaser.comcheck out 
the chute
anymore thoughts on the toggle switch?

7) From: raymanowen
"anymore thoughts on the toggle switch?"
Yes.
The switch is not the problem. If you replace it, you won't solve the
problem.
You might well spend a lot of time and money "shotgunning" the grinder by
replacing a lot of unnecessary parts or modifying the control switching and
wiring.
However, if you want to bypass all of the control and relay contactor
circuitry, and you already have a suitably heavy DPST toggle switch with
fairly large screw terminals, you can use it.
In the original circuit, the switch handles less power than the refrigerato=
r
cabinet light switch on the door. If you make this change, the switch you
install will bypass the original problem, but it will have to handle the
full motor power- several amperes instead of milliamperes.
Just transfer the wires from L1 and L2 of the contactor relay to the two
common terminals of the switch. Transfer the wires from X1 and X2 of the
contactor relay to the NO terminals of the switch.
If there are 2 or 3 wires on a single terminal of the contactor, transfer
them together to the switch terminals, and that's all there is to it. Still
a waste, IMO.
There is no difference between starting and running the PSC motor, so if it
will run while you hold the switch, why not just run it that way and don't
change anything? If you get it to run, that's its normal "run" mode. Holdin=
g
the switch for 5 seconds to grind won't give you carpal tunnel syndrome
either.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 5/19/06, john irwin  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Wichita WurliTzer

8) From: john irwin
Already have carpal tunnel :)   thanks for the advise on rewiring the rig. I 
like the motor to run while I open and close the hopper trap. Filling the 
basket is more difficult while holding the switch.
<Snip>

9) From: raymanowen
Sorry, I got stuck on the E.H.Horse/ Panama Berlina. 65g in 12c = ++ Flav=
or
program.
Also, the Grinder switch is like a Corvair engine, and has nearly as many
parts. You think you've got it all together, but if there's still One part
left on the bench- You're Walking!
'Tain't funny, McGee- that switch is composed of at least Fifty (50)
separate parts. Four of them are SPRINGS that can cause things to go their
separate ways! Unbelievable. The Seattle airplane factory came to mind-
BOEING! -ro
Brass is invisible on a hardwood floor...

10) From: Justin Marquez
On 5/21/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
Does it need oil added every 50 miles, too ?
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

11) From: raymanowen
My '60 and '65 Corvair engines actually used a lot less than a quart every
2,000 miles. I drained and changed the oil every even thousand miles.
I found the Atlas 690 belt would stay on the engine, no matter how much I
thrashed it. Hammer Mechanics didn't install them right, and drivers never
checked them.
The trouble was you flip the belt, you lose the cooling blower. There's no
aerodynamic cooling air flow at all. (The generator light just stayed on)
The hot cylinder heads would cook the O-rings on that end of the 12 pushrod
tubes. The thing was then destined to be a road oiler until the O-rings wer=
e
replaced.
They were lots of fun to work on , and Nader and the Hammer Mechanics were
my friends. Lots of Corvairs showed up in salvage yards. I almost did- at
Swedish in Denver town. Like Liberace, I bought the place- almost. Only
remember the last three months @ Craig a little.
I'm still putting the Damn Switch back together. It's done, finally. It has
about 50 parts, 4 of which are Springs!!?XX*XX?!!
It is now tomorrow. I had no coffee yesterday, thanks to the Damn Switch.
Teach me to be curious about something that works OK, to the point of takin=
g
it apart. My 32-year legacy, resulting from La Hospital visit.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

12) From: Justin Marquez
On 5/23/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
Yeah - my 1960 Corvair (bought in college in 1968...) took a quart of oil
about every 50-100 miles.  Didn't burn it - it dripped out of the gasketed
joint between the two halves of the aluminum engine block as I recall it.
I think the quip "If you don't own an oil well... get one!" originated as a
result of the Corvair engine!
Other than the fact that it leaked oil, it was a reasonably dependable car.
We drove it for a little over a year until I graduated and got a job and
could afford a new car.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

13) From: raymanowen
"...[oil] dripped out of the gasketed joint between the two halves of the
aluminum engine block as I recall it."
Justin, The block is in two halves, but it wasn't gasketed because the cam
rode directly in the aluminum and the clearance of the main crankshaft
bearings as well would have been dependent on the torque of the 8 through
bolts holding the block together.
Except for a few mm of the seam length, there were gasketed covers to seal
the top, bottom, front and rear of the engine. The oil pump and pressure
regulator were in that rear adaptor casting, along with the oil filter, fue=
l
pump, alternator or generator and distributor.
The pushrod tube O-rings and that rear adaptor were the usual leak sources,
along with the rocker arm studs- that are the lower cylinder head nuts, als=
o
sealed with an O-ring!
I wish I could find another Mazzervair grinder/ switch or engine to rebuild=
.
They're both neat puzzles to assemble. The switch is sadistic with Four (4)
Springs that tend to disassemble one half while you're working on the other=
.
Whoever has been putting toggle switches in place of the original Mazzer
switch has a pile of perfectly good switches. They weren't the problem. It
was the noisy contactor latch contacts, each of which has a pair of brown
wires.
The easy fix is to install a small gauge jumper wire across the latch
contacts- #13, and #14 on the contactor originally. That will cause the
motor to run when you turn it on. Start won't do anything because it will
already be running.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

14) From: raymanowen
"...[oil] dripped out of the gasketed joint between the two halves of the
aluminum engine block as I recall it."
Justin, The block is in two halves, but it wasn't gasketed because the cam
rode directly in the aluminum and the clearance of the main crankshaft
bearings as well would have been dependent on the torque of the 8 through
bolts holding the block together.
Except for a few mm of the seam length, there were gasketed covers to seal
the top, bottom, front and rear of the engine. The oil pump and pressure
regulator were in that rear adaptor casting, along with the oil filter, fue=
l
pump, alternator or generator and distributor.
The pushrod tube O-rings and that rear adaptor were the usual leak sources,
along with the rocker arm studs- that are the lower cylinder head nuts, als=
o
sealed with an O-ring!
I wish I could find another Mazzervair grinder/ switch or engine to rebuild=
.
They're both neat puzzles to assemble. The switch is sadistic with Four (4)
Springs that tend to disassemble one half while you're working on the other=
.
Whoever has been putting toggle switches in place of the original Mazzer
switch has a pile of perfectly good switches. They weren't the problem. It
was the noisy contactor latch contacts, each of which has a pair of brown
wires.
The easy fix is to install a small gauge jumper wire across the latch
contacts- #13, and #14 on the contactor originally. That will cause the
motor to run when you turn it on. Start won't do anything because it will
already be running.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976
On 5/23/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
les.
<Snip>
never
<Snip>
d on)
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Wichita WurliTzer

15) From: john irwin
no coffee today in honor of Ray.
<Snip>

16) From: raymanowen
Thanks, John- I need that. As I said,I beat the switch only the last time I
put it together. Eye-hand coordination and manual dexterity are in big
demand there- and short on my part. Hi!
Plus, I didn't devote any roast to the secondary grinders floating around.
There was a reason I spent $225 on an old used grinder, the upper burr
carrier of which weighs more than the S'Meister Plus that was costing near
$200 at the time.
Damian gets a big kick out of it when I show up with the airpot and a coffe=
e
cup, but I didn't want to hurry anything. Not with the latest- a 50:50 blen=
d
of L30 Horse + the last 30g of Sumatra Mandheling I have. No mistakes with
that.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 5/24/06, john irwin  wrote:
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
l
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976


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