HomeRoast Digest


Topic: GIANT Trossers Grinders - Vintage (32 msgs / 650 lines)
1) From: Lee Shannon
I just ordered and received two GIANT manual vintage
Trossers.
They are huge and heavy.  Cast Iron and Stainless
Steel - 12 inches tall and about 20 lbs.  They appear
like they are new and unused - or at least the two I
just got do.
I have mostly Zass grinders (turkish and square
wooden) and many models of Spong and Salter grinders.
I've never had a Trosser before - the adjustments
appear to be on the bottom of the grinder.
I ordered two - my wife is going to kill me.
She likes my home-roasting and thinks the vintage
grinders and odd brewers are neat - but thinks I'm
obsessive (I have to agree).
 - Lee
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2) From: Michael Wade
Lee, any chance we could see some pictures?  The big Trossers sound really 
neat.
Michael Wade

3) From: Alchemist John
That is one nice looking piece.  Can you give us some specs on 
it.  How big are the burrs?  I would hope they are good ground burrs 
and not cast.  Remembering I own, use and love my Zass daily, it 
looks like it has overcome the one item I dislike about my Zass - 
drawer and hopper size.  How much does it hold?  Please - report report.
Oh, and why did you get two?
4At 09:36 6/2/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

4) From: Lee Shannon
Other than the general size, I have not measured them.
It also dealt with what I percieved as the only
drawbacks of my other manual grinders - size of hopper
and size of drawer.
I don't know if the burrs are cast or not - and I
don't really know how to tell.  Mine appear nice and
sharp and the grinders appear to be unused
New-Old-Stock.
I bought two because the this site usually sells out
of neat items very quickly.  Usually I ask myself - do
I really need X, y or Z from this place and by the
time I finish struggling over the issue - they have
sold out of whatever I am interested in.  I have never
seen these before, and decided if I didn't give one
away as a gift, I could always keep it as a backup or
spare.
After I got them, I also thought that I could set each
for different grinds and not have to worry about
adjusting them back and forth after I get them dialed
in.
I did use it Saturday morning and it did ground powder
fine.  They provided a clamp in mine (not sure how it
attaches) to prevent it moving around.  
I just put mine on a kitchen towel so that it would
not mar the countertop when I cranked.
I'm at work, but I could use a measuring cup to
measure how much the hopper holds.  I have it next to
my zass - and it appears holds a lot more.
 - Lee
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5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Well, I think it is official, I need only to have my head examined to
confirm it....
I just lost contact with my senses and just ordered a giant coffee
grinder. Guess I will have to go out and pick up some bricks and
mortar so that I can build a pedestal for the grinder in my
kitchen....
Brian
On 6/4/06, Lee Shannon  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Dan Bollinger
Yeh,  I bought one of these monsters two days ago, too!  :)

7) From: Brian Kamnetz
I'm thinking the Giant Trosser grinding mechanism must be something
quite hard if the Germans ordered these things to make coffee for
ships' entire crews, where they would presumably grind more coffee in
one day than I grind in a year or two....
It would be interesting to know what grade of coffee the Germans
provided for their officers and crews at the time these grinders were
commissioned, and whether the coffee was roasted aboard ship.
Brian
On 6/4/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Alchemist John
I think I am going to get one.  Did you confirm the grind is 
difficult to adjust?  How do you do it.  I can't imagine getting one 
for espresso that constantly needs subtle adjustment
Can you give me a weight to time estimate?  How much in how long.  In 
my zass I can do about 40 g in 1.5-2 minutes for drip, or 18 g for 
espresso in about a minute or slightly over.
At 11:06 6/4/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

9) From: Lee Shannon
The grind was easy to adjust - It adjusts on the
bottom -  just pull out the drawer - no problem to
reach in and twirl the nut on the bottom of the
grinding mechanism back and forth.
I just tightened it up till the burrs touched and then
backed it off 1/3 to 1/2 a turn.
I usually don't time how fast/much I can grind,
but It did do a lot more in a shorter time than I
usually do with my zass.
1962 is on the label on the back of it - don't know if
that is the date it was manufactured or not.
--- Alchemist John  wrote:
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10) From: Brian Kamnetz
My giant Trosser arrived today, in pretty good shape. There was a hole
punched in the side of the box, which turned out to be made by the
threaded shaft that the handle screws onto. The threads survived
pretty well, but the first thread or so, while not mashed, is just
"bent" enough that the handle won't screw on easily. What is a good
way for me to proceed? Wire brush? I don't have much of a file
collection, but could get an appropriate one, maybe one of those
little triangular files? Of course, there is always the Brute Force
method, but the idea of using the threads to correct themselves gives
me the yips.
Any suggestions are appreciated.
Thanks,
Brian
On 6/4/06, Lee Shannon  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Michael Dhabolt
Brian,
<Snip>
Sounds like you've got the right idea.
Mike (just plain)

12) From: Lee Shannon
Take it to a local machinist.
I'm sure they could use their taps and dies
to clean up the thread in a minute or so.
I would hate to ruin the Trosser.
 - Lee
--- Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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13) From: Vince Doss
I have used one of these in a small size, not sure where you may get one
though.http://www.buckinghammfg.com/linemen/optr.htmlOn 6/12/06, Lee Shannon  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks to everyone who responded with advice. Guess I'll pick up a
small triangular file and try that (I think it will work, I think I
can see the problem area) and if that doesn't work, take the Giant
Trosser to a machinist.
Brian
On 6/12/06, Vince Doss  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Scott Marquardt
If you're going to get a file, don't get a triangular. Get one of the flat
ones that is sharp on one side. The pitch of the triangular file will be too
much for the threads, and you'll make things worse.
The threads may be metric anyway, so you'll have to pick your machinist
carefully if you're in the U.S.
- Scott
On 6/12/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Scott

16) From: Michael Dhabolt
Actually - - the internal angle on most threads is 60, so the
triangular file is the correct one for 'dressing' them.  Even metric
threads are close enough that dressing the lead in thread from the
type of damage you describe is usually accomplished with a triangular
(60, 60, 60) file, if you don't have a 'thread file' of the correc=
t
pitch or the correct die.  The tool that Vince recommends is really
nice but a bit expensive for a single use.
Mike (just plain)

17) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
I agree with Mike, it will work just fine.   Dan
fyi:  I have a set of thread dressing files that are made for that purpose, but 
they are for machinists and repairers, and you can't find them in your average 
hardware store.

18) From: Brian Kamnetz
Ok, thanks again for the info. Seems like at some time in the misty
past I may have bought a triangular file... I'll go home and see if i
can find one.
Brian
On 6/12/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
e, but
<Snip>
erage
<Snip>
ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

19) From: Dan Bollinger
Lee, Thanks for turning us on to this great item!  Mine arrived today and I'm 
quite pleased with it even though I've not ground any coffee with it yet.  I 
took a photo of it and the grinding mechanism.  It is at: 
www.claycritters.com/coffee/trosser.jpg
I think 'giant' is a misnomer.  By any comparison, this is probably the smallest 
stationary coffee grinder ever made.  By stationary, I mean it is designed to be 
screwed down to a counter top.  It's lack of flywheel is testament to it's small 
size as well.  You wouldn't expect a Zass to have a flywheel.
It looks like it will grind a pound or half-kilo at a time.
The burr ring (stator) is hardened cast steel. It floats in a recess.   The burr 
(rotor) is milled steel and hardened. The milling is rough, but then coffee 
doesn't need a diamond polished cutter.
The adjustment knob has fine threads. It does not press directly on the bottom 
of the burr, as they do in pepper mills.  This presses on a hardened steel 
pressure plate, which in turn presses on a hardened ball imbedded in the end of 
the vertical burr shaft.  This mechanism was intended to grind a lot o coffee 
for many years.
Dan
<Snip>

20) From: Lee Shannon
Glad you like it.  However, I'll stand firm and stick
with my appellation (YMMV).  Pick up your Zass (with
your thumb and forefinger) and then pick up your
Trosser the same way.
I DO know what you mean - those large 4' to 5'
grinders with wheels.  But try putting one of those in
your kitchen and see what your wife says.
These Trossers are the Ahhnold of table-top manual
grinders.  
 - Lee
--- Dan Bollinger  wrote:
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21) From: Lee Shannon
I was actually comparing it to my zass's, spongs and
salters (the later two types being the cast iron
models).  Home personal-use grinders of old, not old
commercial grinders.  
 - Lee
--- Lee Shannon  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
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22) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
LOL!  You can call it whatever you like as long as you extend that same 
privilege to me.  ;)   We both know that Trosser was designed to be bolted to a 
counter in a galley, not held in the lap or between the knees like our 
Zassenhauses.    Dan

23) From: Scott Marquardt
Mea culpa on thread angles.
My own concern -- the only thing really holding me back -- is how difficult
it looks to dial in a particular grind, change it, then get it back to the
first setting.
It's a good-looking unit, though.
You know the one I want? Anyone here remember "The Waltons?" The guy with
the general store had this whopping big thing with two flywheels. THAT's
what I want.  ;-)
On 6/12/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Alchemist John
Granted it is not as convenient as a top adjustment, I just marked 
the nut with a sharpie.  Gets me back pretty quick.
I am finding with after just a couple days, I am really enjoying 
it.  I like the manual grinders, but I have to say, the Zass was a 
little tiring after a few years.  Dropping from 2 minutes to 30 or so 
seconds for a pot of coffee is nice.  And quite a consistent grind 
also.  I hazard to say, it might well be better than my Zass.
The cups seem to have more...."clarity" if that makes sense.
At 21:13 6/12/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

25) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Maybe its your lack of wheezing and panting that improved the cup?  :)

26) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
You can find large countertop grinders on eBay all the time.  The fellow =
who turned me onto homeroasting and Sweet Marias has a collection of =
them. 
  You know the one I want? Anyone here remember "The Waltons?" The guy =
with the general store had this whopping big thing with two flywheels. =
THAT's what I want.  ;-)

27) From: Michael Wascher
They're available, still being made. They are used by Amish, albeit usually
for grinding grains, but quite suitable for coffee too.
On 6/13/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

28) From: Brian Kamnetz
Dan,
Thanks for the more technical description of the Little Big Trosser.
Good to hear that the build is as solid as the look.
I too wish to thank Lee for turning us on to this curious machine.
Brian
On 6/12/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Alchemist John
No, I am one of those heretics that grind the evening before so I 
have coffee waiting when I wake up.  I am all rested by morning :P
At 05:55 6/13/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

30) From: Derek Bradford
...Do you grind for espresso the night before too, or just for other brewing
methods?
On 6/13/06, Alchemist John  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The Uglyroast 3! Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 85% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

31) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-13-112938646
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I grind for drip the night before (and fill the Technivorm with  
coffee and water and the carafe with hot water) so that my tech- 
challenged guys can just empty the carafe, stick it under the spout,  
hit the switch, and go. But for espresso, press-pot and Aeropress, I  
grind just before brewing (for espresso, I grind for only as many  
shots as I am going to pull in the next couple of minutes, dictated  
by the size of the pitcher I'll be steaming if I'm making lattes or  
cappas).
On Jun 13, 2006, at 10:03 AM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-13-112938646
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	charsetO-8859-1
I grind for drip the night =
before (and fill the Technivorm with coffee and water and the carafe =
with hot water) so that my tech-challenged guys can just empty the =
carafe, stick it under the spout, hit the switch, and go. But for =
espresso, press-pot and Aeropress, I grind just before brewing (for =
espresso, I grind for only as many shots as I am going to pull in the =
next couple of minutes, dictated by the size of the pitcher I'll be =
steaming if I'm making lattes or cappas).
On Jun 13, 2006, =
at 10:03 AM, Derek Bradford wrote:
...Do you = grind for espresso the night before too, or just for other brewing = methods? On 6/13/06, Alchemist John < = John> wrote:No, I am one of = those heretics that grind the evening before so I have coffee = waiting when I wake up.I am all rested by morning = :P -- The Uglyroast 3! Coffee = Roaster....Now 85% less ugly! http://uglyroast.atspace.com= = --Apple-Mail-13-112938646--

32) From: Alchemist John
I may be a heretic, but I'm not crazy.  Just drip for my morning 
weekday coffee.  Espresso and weekend coffee is always ground fresh.
BTW, how did your latest someodd# less ugly roaster come out - I 
recall you had binding issues when it heated.
At 08:03 6/13/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/


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