HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Most direct path to quality coffee on a limited budget. Was: +Question for Mike McKoffee . (11 msgs / 317 lines)
1) From: Brett Mason
My Cory Electric is perhaps 60 years old.  Grinds wonderfully for drip.
Just hope it lasts...
Don't be satisfied for the short run...
Brett
On 6/12/06, Peter Schmidt  wrote:
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-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

2) From: James House
Another quality grinder at a decent price would be the Mazzer grinders on
Ebay sold by TagEx.  It may end up costing you as much as 250-300 for a
Major or SJ (you would need to buy new burrs, hopper lid, doser lid), they
may not look too pretty (used), and they are huge and heavy, but you would
have a workhorse.
If the huge Mazzers are overkill.....
Another good grinder is the Baratza Virtuoso from what I hear, and they are
around 200 bucks.  They are better than SMP, probably closer to the quality
of a Rocky.  Reviews can be found here:http://www.coffeegeek.com/reviews/grinders/baratzavirtuoso-james
On 6/12/06, Michael Wade  wrote:
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3) From: Don Cummings
I use the SMP and love it.  It took me a little while to home in on the
optimal settings for each brewing style but now that I have I am amazed each
time I use it at the job it does.
With my FP I get virtually no fines in the cup whatsoever, yet I use a finer
grind setting than I did with my Cuisinart Burr.
When I do pourover I am able to adjust steep time (total pour through time)
by increments of 10 seconds predictably and reliably.
I knew from following forums that the grinder was important to cup quality
but I had absolutely no idea how crucial it was until I upgraded from a
whirly to the Cuisinart Burr.  The difference was staggering. Unfortunately
the amount of dust in the grind with the Cuisinart grew substantially within
just weeks of purchase.  As amazed as I was with the quality jump from
whirly to cheap burr, I was just as impressed by the jump in quality from
cheap burr to the SMP.
On 6/12/06, Michael Wade  wrote:
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-- 
Don

4) From: Steve Hay
Regarding the grinder discussion, I'd like to chime in and say that I
noticed a difference in my coffee brewed using coffee ground from a
whirley-blade and coffee ground from my Mazzer.  However, I do think you can
get a decent ground from a whirley blade if you agitate and pulse and ensure
the little hopper is full enough of beans.  For me this means it is about as
full as you get get it without it starting to spill over with the lid off.
That said, a good grinder is just worth it.  However, I don't think its
necessary to have in order to get a sense for how much better fresh roast
can be than *$s.
I bought some *$s for work the other day because I wanted to give my
roasting a rest for a while during my SC/TO building process.  (This weekend
I hope to assemble it and try it out).  The stuff is obviously from
Guatemala or thereabouts because of the heavy dutch/sweet chocolate flavor,
but they roasted it so dark it flat out tastes burnt.  I think it would have
been good coffee if they hadn't roasted it so dark.  I wonder why they do
that.  Overall the coffee was actually okay, because the chocolate was still
there, but it just made me ponder why anyone would go and do that.  Heck, if
you want some roast character, its your breakfast blend; find another origin
that gives it to you and blend it in, so you don't burn the chocolate.
Sigh.
On another topic, has anyone tried experimenting with resting ground
coffee?  Wondering if you can take a coffee that needs a five day rest and
grind it on the 0-day such that its ready the next day or within 2 days...
Anyone tried this, or does it just make the coffee stale?
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 6/13/06, Steve Hay  wrote:
<Snip>
I wonder if they burn it intentionally, to intentionally mask variety
character with a burnt taste the *$ regular customers identify as the
flavor they are used to?
Brian

6) From: Woody DeCasere
TO some of us $200 is not a decently priced grinder, i am trying my hardest
to allow my wife to let me get a doserless rocky, but she doesn't see why
when our coffee ground with a c-Mill for the FP is so superior to any other
coffee she or our friends have ever had. Would a more consistant grind
produce better results, sure but to what degree, i dont think it would be
much of a discernable difference, I also have an older model Zass that i use
sometimes on trips for the FP ( i always use it for the Espresso machine)
and really there is no difference, and yes my Zass grinds very evenly.
I think a blind tasting would be in order. Someday i will have my rocky and
then we will see i guess.
On 6/13/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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"Good night, and Good Coffee"

7) From: Justin Marquez
On 6/13/06, Woody DeCasere  wrote:
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You ought to try that blind tasting BEFORE you pony up $200 for the new
grinder.  Imagine your dismay if it isn't a lot better and you already
bought it!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

8) From: Sandy Andina
Even if you manage to get a (comparatively) fresh batch of their  
lighter roasts (like Light Note Blend), when it's served in-store  
it's brewed double strength so it has that familiar "corporate" taste  
that they think their customers expect. Such is franchising.  Back  
when they had their Encore mail-order program, they'd ship Priority  
Mail on the same day they roasted and the coffee arrived outgassed  
and ready to rock. I used to get their Light Note (and in summer,  
Gazebo, which I used for espresso till I discovered Caffe d'Arte--- 
way before I was introduced to Intelligentsia, Metropolis, and  
eventually homeroasting), and it was always fresh. The beginning of  
the end came when a batch arrived stale; not surprisingly, they  
announced they were ending the Encore program a week later.
On Jun 13, 2006, at 10:52 AM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

9) From: Sandy Andina
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A $65 Bodum Antigua will blow that C-Mill out of the water and do ya  
just fine for brewed coffee. Heresy, I know.  Personally, I would  
save the Rocky for espresso--nice to not have to constantly adjust  
the burrs for different methods, just a click or two either way for  
the weather and bean freshness.
On Jun 13, 2006, at 11:08 AM, Woody DeCasere wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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A $65 Bodum Antigua will blow =
that C-Mill out of the water and do ya just fine for brewed coffee. =
Heresy, I know. Personally, I would save the Rocky for espresso--nice =
to not have to constantly adjust the burrs for different methods, just a =
click or two either way for the weather and bean =
freshness.
On Jun 13, 2006, at 11:08 AM, Woody DeCasere =
wrote:
TO some of us $200 is not a decently priced grinder, i am = trying my hardest to allow my wife to let me get a doserless rocky, but = she doesn't see why when our coffee ground with a c-Mill for the FP is = so superior to any other coffee she or our friends have ever had. Would = a more consistant grind produce better results, sure but to what degree, = i dont think it would be much of a discernable difference, I also have = an older model Zass that i use sometimes on trips for the FP ( i always = use it for the Espresso machine) and really there is no difference, and = yes my Zass grinds very evenly. I think a blind tasting would be = in order. Someday i will have my rocky and then we will see i = guess. On 6/13/06, Brian Kamnetz < bkamnetz> = wrote:On 6/13/06, Steve Hay < = hay.steve> wrote: > I bought some *$s for work = the other day because I wanted to give my > roasting a rest for a = while during my SC/TO building process.(This weekend > I = hope to assemble it and try it out).The stuff is obviously from = > Guatemala or thereabouts because of the heavy dutch/sweet = chocolate flavor, > but they roasted it so dark it flat out tastes = burnt.I think it would have > been good coffee if they = hadn't roasted it so dark.I wonder why they do > = that. I wonder if they burn it intentionally, to intentionally = mask variety character with a burnt taste the *$ regular customers = identify as the flavor they are used = to? Brian = homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- "Good night, and Good = Coffee" = --Apple-Mail-14-113624065--

10) From: javafool
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
$200 is a lot of money for a lot of people. A Solis grinder can be found =
for
about  that price. If you let Maria know, sometimes she has lightly =
used,
refurbished units at a more respectable price too.
 
Terry
 
On Jun 13, 2006, at 11:08 AM, Woody DeCasere wrote:
TO some of us $200 is not a decently priced grinder, i am trying my =
hardest
to allow my wife to let me get a doserless rocky, but she doesn't see =
why
when our coffee ground with a c-Mill for the FP is so superior to any =
other
coffee she or our friends have ever had. Would a more consistant grind
produce better results, sure but to what degree, i dont think it would =
be
much of a discernable difference, I also have an older model Zass that i =
use
sometimes on trips for the FP ( i always use it for the Espresso =
machine)
and really there is no difference, and yes my Zass grinds very evenly. 
I think a blind tasting would be in order. Someday i will have my rocky =
and
then we will see i guess.
 

11) From: Brett Mason
For a budget minded coffee lover, check out an older, wooden box mill -
Zassenhaus / Trosser - on eBay.  Spend the $30-35 it takes, and enjoy budge=
t
minded luxury.
If the manual grinding is getting to you, check out an older electric
grinder, such as the Cory.
I have owned (and still own) several of each.  They fill the requirement
very well.
And I have a Rocky Doserless too...
Now here's one concept:  My Rocky takes more work, because I have to measur=
e
how much beans, or jsut go with a single selection for several grind
sessions...  My manual grinders I know exactly how much to put in the
hopper, and it's easy to swap out varieties if you want to brew selected
cups...
Regards,
Brett
On 6/13/06, javafool  wrote:
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-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman


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