HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Fwd: Re: +Roasting the Panama Carmen Estate (3 msgs / 53 lines)
1) From: Howell Ite
I have an I-Roast 1 and have been unsuccessful in slowing down the roast.  I set first stage at 350 for 4:00, second stage at 405 for 4:00, and the third stage at 395 for 3:30.  I monitor the temperature using the built in function.  At third stage the temperature goes to 405 regardless of how low I set the temperature for the stage.  Has anybody else experienced this?
Steve Hay  wrote:  From: "Steve Hay" 
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Roasting the Panama Carmen Estate
Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2006 11:43:21 -0400
On 6/13/06, James House  wrote:            It must enjoy a good rest and that is the hope I am leaning on considering how much I bought. :)  I am only a day and a half out, and it is indeed sour.  I noticed similiar sour taste, but not quite as bad, in a batch of Gethumbwini that I roasted right after the 1800. 
I've had the same problem with quite a few coffees.  One thing that has helped in my iRoast is to try to slow down the roast after first crack and let it settle in.  I suspect what is happening is that the roast is uneven, so when I stop at City/City+, there are some sour stragglers.  This technique has been really effective on coffees that seem to be jumping into second crack before first crack has ended with my normal profile. 
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural number which requires more than 50 words to describe it." 

2) From: Vicki Smith
What weight in beans are you using? I get more control with fewer beans, 
it seems. I think it is a result of the added heat from the mass of 
beans themselves. 130 grams seems better than 140 (or more) in terms of 
prolonging the time between cracks.
Vicki (the voice of inexperience)
Howell Ite wrote:
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3) From: Tom Ogren
My first taste of the 1800 (rested 2 days) made me frown, and I didn't
understand the hype, but it has since become a 'top five' favorite in my
stash of twenty varieties. Perhaps more than any other coffee, I cannot say
why I love this one so much. It is a very self-assured bean (if that makes
any sense at all) with a clearly defined flavor structure (tightly knit and
toasty) and a powerful piquant quality. It must, must, must be rested! I
would recommend four days minimum. I really love it straight up, but I have
to share a blend I did recently: 50% FC 1800 (rested about 7 days), 30% FC+
Costa Rica Conquistador (at about 4 days), and 20% C+ Kenya Gethumbwini (at
about 3 days). My Conquistador batch tasted flat to me and I thought it
might serve well as a neutral background player in a blend (a filler of
sorts). I worried that the Kenya and the Panama would step on one another's
toes, but what resulted was tremendous! It was not overly bright and had an
incredible fruited roasty quality that I have not tasted before. I will be
trying to repeat this blend.
~TO in VA
On 6/13/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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